Scientific Earth Conscientious

Scientific progress makes moral progress a necessity; for if man's power is increased, the checks that restrain him from abusing it must be strengthened (Madame de Stael)

Resources Earth Science Educators

Topic Resources
Earth Science in General Elementary: lesson plans; additional resources
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources
Earthquakes and Volcanoes Elementary: lesson plans; additional resources
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources
Energy Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources
Environmental Science Elementary: lesson plans; additional resources
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources
Geology & Geologic Time Elementary:
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources
Mapping and Geography Elementary: lesson plans; additional resources
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: additional resources
Paleontology and Evolution Elementary: lesson plans; additional resources
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources
Plate Tectonics Elementary: lesson plans
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources
Rocks, Minerals and Mining Elementary: lesson plans; additional resources
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources
Space Science Elementary: lesson plans; additional resources
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources
Water Elementary: lesson plans; additional resources
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources
Weather & Climate Elementary: lesson plans; additional resources
Intermediate: lesson plans; additional resources
Secondary: lesson plans; additional resources

Elementary

Earth Science in General

Lesson Plan Links

Teachers Domain – WGBH has just released the new Earth and Space Science collection, with over 200 media-rich resources and 20 lesson plans for K-12 classrooms.
www.teachersdomain.org
Science Review Games – Neat Earth science related review games, in the form of sports games like soccer or basketball.
sciencereviewgames.com/srg/
Where are the Penguins? – a webquest for first graders about penguins. Not really earth science, but great for getting first graders on the computer.
http://www.sd401.k12.il.us/CURRIC/webquests/PenguinWQ/FINAL_WQ_files/frame.htm
SciZone at the Ontario Science Centre – The Ontario Science Centre’s mission is ‘to delight, inform and challenge visitors through engaging and thought-provoking experiences in science and technology. There is a good activity called “Why is the Sky Blue?” – click on Home Lab; Discover Our Rainforest is cute too.
www.ontariosciencecentre.ca/scizone/
Geologic Time: Rock Around the Clock – For grades 3 and up. Kids may have trouble imagining a million years, let alone a billion, but one day’s not so hard. This kid-friendly time line lays out Earth’s history against a 24-hour period.
www.amnh.org/education/resources/
Measure the Circumference of the Earth: The Noon Day Project – This great activity is an opportunity for students to see how mathematics and science work together in explaining a real world phenomenon. (Recommended Grade Levels 5-12 but all are invited to participate).
http://www.k12science.org/noonday/index.html
Try a Science Snack – Snacks are miniature science exhibits that teachers could make using common, inexpensive, easily available materials. By using Snacks in their classrooms, teachers can climb out of the textbooks and join their students in discovering science for themselves.
www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/

Elementary

Earth Science in General

Additional Resources

NASA Space Place
Fun facts, activities, games, and more.
spaceplace.nasa.gov
Paper Plate Science: And you thought paper plates were only for hot dogs and watermelon? Find a variety of science/math based lessons ranging from addition to creating directions of Earth and sky to wind roses. Cheap as a paper plate.
analyzer.depaul.edu/paperplate/activities.htm
Steve Spangler Science – Colorado science whiz site has ideas for demos and activities. Great ideas for special holiday science too.
www.stevespanglerscience.com
Earth Explorers Series – Profiles an atmospheric scientist who flies through hurricanes, an engineer who operates a spectro-radiometer (an instrument on a satellite), an ocean scientist, high school students whose science fair project took them to Croatia, & other “Earth explorers.” (NASA)
science.hq.nasa.gov/education/earth_explorers/
EarthLearningIdea.com
Innovative, Earth-related teaching ideas – free downloadble activities.
earthlearningidea.com
NSF Special Reports – Presents web-based reports on language & linguistics, Einstein & physics, weather patterns, the chemistry of water, the 2004 tsunami, arctic climate research, Admiral Byrd’s historic flight to the South Pole (1929), cyberinfrastructure, fossils, earthquake engineering simulation, ecology of infectious diseases, robotics, visualization of research results & scientific phenomena, the world’s first electronic nervous system, teacher institutes, & Nobel prize winners. (NSF)
www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/
Real-Time Information – Helps ensure that critical information needed by emergency forecasters & managers during extreme events is available. See “live” views of volcanoes around the world, weather images, geologic & mineral resource information, national flood-threat forecasts, & streamflow information. (USGS)
interactive2.usgs.gov/learningweb/explorer/topic_realtime.asp
Earth Science Vocabulary Review – Includes Rock and Mineral Hangman, Astronomy Hangman, printable flash cards, etc.
www.eram.k12.ny.us/education/components/docmgr/default.php?sectiondetailid=30712
Powerpoint Games: Jeopardy, etc., templates that you can use to create games for your classes.
jc-schools.net/tutorials/PPT-games/
E. Ramapo Central SD Earth Science Page: Great lesson plans, computer labs, and links to additional information at:
www.eram.k12.ny.us/education/staff/staff.php?sectionid=2149
Daylight Savings – Clear and concise explanations. See how daylight savings affects different latitudes differently with an animation found under “rationale.”
http://webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/index.html
A list of science units of study on a variety of topics:
http://HomeschoolingOnAShoestring.com/science.html
Webshare activities. A large variety of activities on the NY web share site:
www.wilson.wnyric.org/t/drobison/webshare/forum
Tutorials on Earth Science Subjects:
http://teach.fcps.net/trt20/projects/EKU/
Science misconceptions:
www.amasci.com/miscon/opphys.html
Science Games – Go to this site for the following games and game templates: Science Jeopardy, Science Taboo, Science Bingo, Science Monopoly, Science Bowl and more.
www.csun.edu/~vceed002/ref/games/index.html#Jeopardy
The Understanding Evolution web site – written for teachers but accessible to the general public — is intended to provide “one-stop shopping” for evolution education. The web site is rich in content, with sections on the nature of science, evolution itself, the different lines of evidence supporting evidence, evolution’s relevance to everyday life, widespread misconceptions about evolution, and the history of evolutionary thought.
evolution.berkeley.edu
The Why Files – An email magazine focusing on the science behind the latest news headlines.
whyfiles.org/teach/index.html
Earth Science Reference Tables – This fascinating resource is compiled for assistance on the New York Regents Earth Science test, but has lots of useful information for all earth science teachers.
http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/osa/reftable/esrtchart.htm
Earth Science Share-a-thon – from Thomas McGuire, Caves Creek, AZ, Earth science teacher David Robison and his New York colleagues have assembled a lab share-a-thon web site. Any teacher can freely download about 100 teacher written and classroom tested labs and other activities covering the whole range of Earth science. Many labs include teacher tips and answer keys. A directed, student-centered inquiry mode dominates, and the activities are appropriate for most secondary students. A New York emphasis will be evident in some activities.
www.wilson.wnyric.org/t/drobison/webshare
101 Amazing Earth Facts – Example: What was the deadliest known earthquake? The world’s deadliest recorded earthquake occurred in 1556 in central China. It struck a region where most people lived in caves carved from soft rock. The dwellings collapsed, killing an estimated 830,000 people.
www.space.com/scienceastronomy/101_earth_facts_030722-1.html
Science Fairs – Madeline Binder announces the launch of a new website, which is designed to help middle school, jr. high and high school students through the intricacies of science fair projects one step at a time, also includes a parents guide and a teachers resource page.
www.super-science-fair-projects.com
Earthguide – a collection of links, articles, and other materials amassed by the undergrads at the Univ. of Cal., San Diego. Lacks lesson plans, but has some good links to informational sites and some interesting articles with unusual connections to earth science.
www.earthguide.ucsd.edu
Magic School Bus site “What on Earth” – volcanoes, ecology and weather
www.scholastic.com/magicschoolbus/tour/tour.htm?earth
Extreme Science – has many facts for students to look up regarding earth science, weather, space, technology, and maps. It can be a good site to use if you want your students to explore many science topics.
www.extremescience.com
Science Outlook – This site pulls together headline newsfeeds in six categories, General Science, Technology, Health, Environment, Education and Space. There are no pop-up ads on the site.
www.scienceoutlook.com
Jacques Cousteau Coastal Education Center – (Tuckerton, NJ) 2003 opportunities for educational materials and programs to promote lifelong learning about the ocean sciences.
marine.rutgers.edu/cousteau/education/education.htm
Science & Nature (CNN) – Contains a section that advises the reader about volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and other earth phenomena during the past week. It is a good starting place for research or a place to re-check during a long project. It is useful for all age groups and in teaching both science and geography. See their science and space page also.
www.cnn.com/TECH/
United States Geologic Survey (USGS) – A vast site and the government is offering a great deal of both information and products that can be used by teachers and students. One can purchase maps, aerial photos of specific areas, download free teaching and learning materials, access information about all areas of Geoscience and link to other relevant sites. Teachers of all levels can find suitable materials. Middle and high school students can use this site for research. Elementary students should not be sent here without very specific guidance.
www.usgs.gov/
Visible Earth (NASA) – A compilation of satellite images from around the world that has been shot with various sensors. This site can provide interesting images for use in lessons and can also be used in research by middle and high school students. Elementary students may be able to use the site with adult support. The images are quite varied and can be searched by location and subject. For example, images can be used to study plant distribution in the oceans or the effect of forest fires.
visibleearth.nasa.gov/
The Learning Web (USGS) – Part of the USGS system; this particular section specifically offers lesson plans and activities for teacher to use with students. There is a link to featured careers in the geosciences called “Scientists in Action” which gives vignettes of real people doing real science.
www.usgs.gov/education/
Ask a Geologist (USGS) – You can browse through a collected set of frequently asked questions. In addition, you can e-mail, phone or fax a specific question that is not covered. You may also write to the Subaru Distinguished Earth Science Teacher for education related questions.
ask.usgs.gov/faqs.html
Tools for teachers – changes weekly, look up past tools, like certificate making, or the crossword puzzle maker:
www.theeducatorsnetwork.com/main/toolfeature.htm
Earth Net – A product of the Natural Resources Department of Canada. This organization is analogous to the USGS in the United States. This site has a wide range of activities and text that can be downloaded. Every major topic in the Earth Sciences is covered. The site content is best suited to students in grade levels 7 through 11 however, there are activities that are suitable to grade 4 through 6 but would require revision to match reading level to student abilities. The content is well suited to US audiences except where there are references to provinces or typically Canadian issues.
earthnet.bio.ns.ca/index.html
Tasa Graphic Arts Company – Tasa Graphic Arts Co. has produced state of the art multimedia products for use in the Earth Science and Environment Science Classrooms. Of particular interest is the Plate Tectonics puzzle, interactive CD-ROM on Mineral Identification and topographic map study. They provide online ordering. Go to the following site or call this number for a special password to receive 15% off your order!
www.tasagraphicarts.com/
PUMAS – the Practical Uses of Math and Science – An online journal of short examples of everyday applications to math and science. Many of the topics are earth science related. The examples are developed by university faculty and have wonderful interdisciplinary connections. You can search the examples by age group and by the National Science Benchmarks by following this link to PUMAS Examples page that then leads to the PUMAS Examples Search Page.
pumas.jpl.nasa.gov/
Smithsonian Museum of Natural History – Contains a varied amount of information that does change with time. It is most appropriate to students in grades 7 -12. Most intriguing are the virtual field trips through the museum. The site also allows the user to enter a keyword and search for information.
www.mnh.si.edu/
Digital Library for Earth System Education – A library of digitally accessible resources for learning about the Earth system, and an open, organized community of users. This community, composed of educators, students, and developers of technology and content, is engaged in building the library at all levels.
www.dlese.org
For Teachers: Exploratorium Learning Studio Resource Guide: Earth System Science – The Exploratorium’s Learning Studio has created several web Resource Guides for educators.
In this issue they are featuring Earth System Science, “An integrated approach to the study of the Earth that stresses investigations of the interactions among the Earth’s components in order to explain Earth dynamics, evolution, and global change.” (Earth Observatory Glossary) [saturn.exploratorium.edu/ls/infosources/EarthSystemInfo.html]
For a full list of our web Resource Guides for Educators, see: www.exploratorium.edu/ls/infosources/ResGuides.html
DragonflyTV – is devoted entirely to science for kids ages 9-12. “But it’s not like any science show you’ve ever seen – because it’s real kids doing real science! In every episode, real kids tell about their own investigations – how they explore the science in the things they love to do.” Offers free educator’s guides, an interactive Web site and classroom packs of the DFTV Zine, a science journal for kids. Earth science topics are water, rocks, weather and air.
pbskids.org/dragonflytv/. Click on Teacher’s Guide.
Rubrics – This site has a collection of rubric examples, including some for science classes, from the Educator’s Network.
http://www.theeducatorsnetwork.com/main/rubricfeature.htm
Geology.com – a site with many geologic links, including “geology basics”.
www.geology.com/
The Learning Team – is a publisher of inquiry-based science software, including physics, earth science, environmental science, general science and teacher resources. They publish and sell educational software developed by some of the world’s leading science and education institutions, and under Earth Science includes: GETIT (Geoscience Education Through Interactive Technology) which uses interactive, inquiry-based activities that closely simulate real-life research practices and incorporate simulations of advanced research in earthquakes, plate tectonics, volcanoes, hurricanes, and more. In EarthView Explorer, students can investigate using recent and authentic global data relevant to the geosphere; hydrosphere, biosphere; atmosphere and climate. Students can modify the view of the global data, sample or graph numeric data, and interact with a model of global climate.
www.learningteam.org/index.html
Careers – The American Geosciences Institute has a short, printable career brochure entitled “What Do Geoscientists Do?” with neat links on the right side for more specific information.
earthinspace.org/careers/
Earth Science Flashcards – from Flashcard Exchange, find over 90 flashcard sets for testing knowledge in geology, astronomy, oceanography, and meteorology. Available in an html and java format, the cards won’t tap higher order thinking skills and some of the flashcard answers lack depth; still, this site is a quick way to gauge subject matter mastery. It is also a good site to have brighter students critique: what is wrong with a flashcard answer and why? Flashcards are also available for the humanities, languages, and the humanities. (Audience: middle school and up)
flashcardexchange.com/directory.jsp?id=46
The CDE (Colorado Dept. of Education) – has a Science section that includes “Standards in Action” highlighting papers from the ERIC Digest of interest to science teachers. These include “Teaching Science Through Inquiry”, “Earth Systems Education”, “Teaching Evolution in School Science Classes” and “Teaching Science in the Field.”
www.cde.state.co.us/action/curric/sci/eric.htm
American Museum of Natural History – Visit their Web site for a free, easy-to-navigate online database of the Museum’s scientific and educational materials. Includes hands-on activities for all ages, curriculum materials, interactive stimulations, videos of scientists at work, etc.
www.amnh.org/education/resources

Intermediate

Earth Science in General

Lesson Plans

Reaction Paper — A way to get students to read and comprehend literature on earth science related topics. Teachers can customize for their current needs and for other subjects. Emphasizes the importance of reading and staying aware of current events.

Open-Ended Scientific Method Lab — An introduction to the nature of science and the terms hypothesis, experiment, observation, and inference.

Lesson Plan Links

Teachers Domain – WGBH has just released the new Earth and Space Science collection, with over 200 media-rich resources and 20 lesson plans for K-12 classrooms.
www.teachersdomain.org
Geoteach extra credit earth science worksheet. Great activities kids can do on their own.
www.geolor.com/geoteach/Geoteach_Earth_Science_Extra_Credit_Page_geolor.htm
Science Review Games – Neat Earth science related review games, in the form of sports games like soccer or basketball.
sciencereviewgames.com/srg/
Jefferson Lab Games and Puzzles – by Jefferson Labs — Find a collection of on-line games for the retention of the elements and the periodic table. Examples includes element flash cards, hangman, matching and crossword puzzles. Other math and science games are also found at the site. (Audience: middle school and high school)
education.jlab.org/indexpages/elementgames.html
Measure the Circumference of the Earth: The Noon Day Project – This great activity is an opportunity for students to see how mathematics and science work together in explaining a real world phenomenon. (Recommended Grade Levels 5-12 but all are invited to participate).
www.k12science.org/noonday/
Try a Science Snack – Snacks are miniature science exhibits that teachers could make using common, inexpensive, easily available materials. By using Snacks in their classrooms, teachers can climb out of the textbooks and join their students in discovering science for themselves.
www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/

Intermediate

Earth Science in General

Additional Resources

NASA Space Place
Fun facts, activities, games, and more.
spaceplace.nasa.gov
EarthLearningIdea.com
Innovative, Earth-related teaching ideas – free downloadble activities.
earthlearningidea.com
Paper Plate Science: And you thought paper plates were only for hot dogs and watermelon? Find a variety of science/math based lessons ranging from addition to creating directions of Earth and sky to wind roses. Cheap as a paper plate.
analyzer.depaul.edu/paperplate/activities.htm
Steve Spangler Science – Colorado science whiz site has ideas for demos and activities. Great ideas for special holiday science too.
www.stevespanglerscience.com
Extra Credit Earth Science Assignments – Find an impressive list of short exercises for extra credit (or for credit). Exercises cover a variety of earth science topics with accompanying references. The fact that these resources are on one page makes them quite accessible.
www.geolor.com/geoteach/Geoteach_Earth_Science_Extra_Credit_Page_geolor.htm
Case Studies in Science – National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science: Find a variety of case studies on different subjects. In geology you will find high interest case studies on the dams, landslides, sinkholes, and the killer Lake Nyos. There are cases in Astronomy, Meteorology, Environment and many more. Sections to help you use case studies include “Guidelines for Using Our Cases,” “Guidelines for Submitting a Case,” which actually provides more information on how to use case studies in addition to submission requirements.
ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/projects/cases/ubcase.htm
How the Foucault Pendulum Works
www.calacademy.org/products/pendulum/page7.htm#floor
Doppler Effect – Description and set of animations illustrating Doppler Effect and its uses.
www.kettering.edu/~drussell/Demos/doppler/doppler.html
Science Powerpoints, CFAT – Find a variety of PowerPoint presentations for a number of different science topics in chemistry, earth science, biology, and physics.
Chemistry Powerpoint Presentations: sun.menloschool.org/~cfat/powerpoint/chemistry/powerpoint.html
Earth Science Powerpoint Presentations: sun.menloschool.org/~cfat/powerpoint/earth_science/powerpoint.html
Physics Powerpoint Presentations: its.fvtc.edu/physics/presents.htm
Open Access Journals – Lund University Libraries. This service covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals. The site aims to cover all subjects and languages. Journals in Earth Sciences, Ecology, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Geology, Geophysics and Geomagnetism, Meteorology and Climatology, and Oceanography.
www.doaj.org/ljbs?cpid=78
Earth Explorers Series – Profiles an atmospheric scientist who flies through hurricanes, an engineer who operates a spectro-radiometer (an instrument on a satellite), an ocean scientist, high school students whose science fair project took them to Croatia, & other “Earth explorers.” (NASA)
science.hq.nasa.gov/education/earth_explorers/
NSF Special Reports – Presents web-based reports on language & linguistics, Einstein & physics, weather patterns, the chemistry of water, the 2004 tsunami, arctic climate research, Admiral Byrd’s historic flight to the South Pole (1929), cyberinfrastructure, fossils, earthquake engineering simulation, ecology of infectious diseases, robotics, visualization of research results & scientific phenomena, the world’s first electronic nervous system, teacher institutes, & Nobel prize winners. (NSF)
www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/
Real-Time Information – Helps ensure that critical information needed by emergency forecasters & managers during extreme events is available. See “live” views of volcanoes around the world, weather images, geologic & mineral resource information, national flood-threat forecasts, & streamflow information. (USGS)
interactive2.usgs.gov/learningweb/explorer/topic_realtime.asp
Earth Science Vocabulary Review – Includes Rock and Mineral Hangman, Astronomy Hangman, printable flash cards, etc.
www.eram.k12.ny.us/education/components/docmgr/default.php?sectiondetailid=30712
Eyes of Science – This site provides science educators and their students with useful online resources to bring those vast data that scientists and educators are compiling into clearer focus for research and classroom use. Side links to feeds from science web cams, current weather conditions, astronomical events, seismic stations, science organizations, and numerous health, social and economic information services help monitor our dynamic Earth.
homepage.mac.com/ear2ground/iblog/B595170230/
Powerpoint Games: Jeopardy, etc., templates that you can use to create games for your classes.
jc-schools.net/tutorials/PPT-games/
E. Ramapo Central SD Earth Science Page: Great lesson plans, computer labs, and links to additional information at:
www.eram.k12.ny.us/education/staff/staff.php?sectionid=2149
Daylight Savings – Clear and concise explanations. See how daylight savings affects different latitudes differently with an animation found under “rationale.”
http://webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/index.html
A list of science units of study on a variety of topics:
http://HomeschoolingOnAShoestring.com/science.html
Webshare activities. A large variety of activities on the NY web share site:
www.wilson.wnyric.org/t/drobison/webshare/forum
Tutorials on Earth Science Subjects:
http://teach.fcps.net/trt20/projects/EKU/
Science misconceptions:
www.amasci.com/miscon/opphys.html
Science Games – Go to this site for the following games and game templates: Science Jeopardy, Science Taboo, Science Bingo, Science Monopoly, Science Bowl and more.
www.csun.edu/~vceed002/ref/games/index.html#Jeopardy
The Understanding Evolution web site – written for teachers but accessible to the general public — is intended to provide “one-stop shopping” for evolution education. The web site is rich in content, with sections on the nature of science, evolution itself, the different lines of evidence supporting evidence, evolution’s relevance to everyday life, widespread misconceptions about evolution, and the history of evolutionary thought.
evolution.berkeley.edu
The Why Files – An email magazine focusing on the science behind the latest news headlines.
whyfiles.org/teach/index.html
Earth Science Reference Tables – This fascinating resource is compiled for assistance on the New York Regents Earth Science test, but has lots of useful information for all earth science teachers.
http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/osa/reftable/esrtchart.htm
Earth Science Share-a-thon – from Thomas McGuire, Caves Creek, AZ, Earth science teacher David Robison and his New York colleagues have assembled a lab share-a-thon web site. Any teacher can freely download about 100 teacher written and classroom tested labs and other activities covering the whole range of Earth science. Many labs include teacher tips and answer keys. A directed, student-centered inquiry mode dominates, and the activities are appropriate for most secondary students. A New York emphasis will be evident in some activities.
www.wilson.wnyric.org/t/drobison/webshare
101 Amazing Earth Facts – Example: What was the deadliest known earthquake? The world’s deadliest recorded earthquake occurred in 1556 in central China. It struck a region where most people lived in caves carved from soft rock. The dwellings collapsed, killing an estimated 830,000 people.
www.space.com/scienceastronomy/101_earth_facts_030722-1.html
Science Fairs – Madeline Binder announces the launch of a new website, which is designed to help middle school, jr. high and high school students through the intricacies of science fair projects one step at a time, also includes a parents guide and a teachers resource page.
www.super-science-fair-projects.com
Earthguide – a collection of links, articles, and other materials amassed by the undergrads at the Univ. of Cal., San Diego. Lacks lesson plans, but has some good links to informational sites and some interesting articles with unusual connections to earth science.
www.earthguide.ucsd.edu
Magic School Bus site “What on Earth” – volcanoes, ecology and weather
www.scholastic.com/magicschoolbus/tour/tour.htm?earth
Extreme Science – has many facts for students to look up regarding earth science, weather, space, technology, and maps. It can be a good site to use if you want your students to explore many science topics.
www.extremescience.com
Science Outlook – This site pulls together headline newsfeeds in six categories, General Science, Technology, Health, Environment, Education and Space. There are no pop-up ads on the site.
www.scienceoutlook.com
Jacques Cousteau Coastal Education Center – (Tuckerton, NJ) 2003 opportunities for educational materials and programs to promote lifelong learning about the ocean sciences.
marine.rutgers.edu/cousteau/education/education.htm
Science & Nature (CNN) – Contains a section that advises the reader about volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and other earth phenomena during the past week. It is a good starting place for research or a place to re-check during a long project. It is useful for all age groups and in teaching both science and geography. See their science and space page also.
www.cnn.com/TECH/
United States Geologic Survey (USGS) – A vast site and the government is offering a great deal of both information and products that can be used by teachers and students. One can purchase maps, aerial photos of specific areas, download free teaching and learning materials, access information about all areas of Geoscience and link to other relevant sites. Teachers of all levels can find suitable materials. Middle and high school students can use this site for research. Elementary students should not be sent here without very specific guidance.
www.usgs.gov/
Visible Earth (NASA) – A compilation of satellite images from around the world that has been shot with various sensors. This site can provide interesting images for use in lessons and can also be used in research by middle and high school students. Elementary students may be able to use the site with adult support. The images are quite varied and can be searched by location and subject. For example, images can be used to study plant distribution in the oceans or the effect of forest fires.
visibleearth.nasa.gov/
The Learning Web (USGS) – Part of the USGS system; this particular section specifically offers lesson plans and activities for teacher to use with students. There is a link to featured careers in the geosciences called “Scientists in Action” which gives vignettes of real people doing real science.
www.usgs.gov/education/
Ask a Geologist (USGS) – You can browse through a collected set of frequently asked questions. In addition, you can e-mail, phone or fax a specific question that is not covered. You may also write to the Subaru Distinguished Earth Science Teacher for education related questions.
ask.usgs.gov/faqs.html
Tools for teachers – changes weekly, look up past tools, like certificate making, or the crossword puzzle maker:
www.theeducatorsnetwork.com/main/toolfeature.htm
Earth Net – A product of the Natural Resources Department of Canada. This organization is analogous to the USGS in the United States. This site has a wide range of activities and text that can be downloaded. Every major topic in the Earth Sciences is covered. The site content is best suited to students in grade levels 7 through 11 however, there are activities that are suitable to grade 4 through 6 but would require revision to match reading level to student abilities. The content is well suited to US audiences except where there are references to provinces or typically Canadian issues.
earthnet.bio.ns.ca/index.html
Tasa Graphic Arts Company – Tasa Graphic Arts Co. has produced state of the art multimedia products for use in the Earth Science and Environment Science Classrooms. Of particular interest is the Plate Tectonics puzzle, interactive CD-ROM on Mineral Identification and topographic map study. They provide online ordering. Go to the following site or call this number for a special password to receive 15% off your order!
www.tasagraphicarts.com/
PUMAS – the Practical Uses of Math and Science – An online journal of short examples of everyday applications to math and science. Many of the topics are earth science related. The examples are developed by university faculty and have wonderful interdisciplinary connections. You can search the examples by age group and by the National Science Benchmarks by following this link to PUMAS Examples page that then leads to the PUMAS Examples Search Page.
pumas.jpl.nasa.gov/
Smithsonian Museum of Natural History – Contains a varied amount of information that does change with time. It is most appropriate to students in grades 7 -12. Most intriguing are the virtual field trips through the museum. The site also allows the user to enter a keyword and search for information.
www.mnh.si.edu/
Digital Library for Earth System Education – A library of digitally accessible resources for learning about the Earth system, and an open, organized community of users. This community, composed of educators, students, and developers of technology and content, is engaged in building the library at all levels.
www.dlese.org
For Teachers: Exploratorium Learning Studio Resource Guide: Earth System Science – The Exploratorium’s Learning Studio has created several web Resource Guides for educators.
In this issue they are featuring Earth System Science, “An integrated approach to the study of the Earth that stresses investigations of the interactions among the Earth’s components in order to explain Earth dynamics, evolution, and global change.” (Earth Observatory Glossary) [saturn.exploratorium.edu/ls/infosources/EarthSystemInfo.html]
For a full list of our web Resource Guides for Educators, see: www.exploratorium.edu/ls/infosources/ResGuides.html
DragonflyTV – is devoted entirely to science for kids ages 9-12. “But it’s not like any science show you’ve ever seen – because it’s real kids doing real science! In every episode, real kids tell about their own investigations – how they explore the science in the things they love to do.” Offers free educator’s guides, an interactive Web site and classroom packs of the DFTV Zine, a science journal for kids. Earth science topics are water, rocks, weather and air.
pbskids.org/dragonflytv/. Click on Teacher’s Guide.
Rubrics – This site has a collection of rubric examples, including some for science classes, from the Educator’s Network.
http://www.theeducatorsnetwork.com/main/rubricfeature.htm
Geology.com – a site with many geologic links, including “geology basics”.
www.geology.com/
The Learning Team – is a publisher of inquiry-based science software, including physics, earth science, environmental science, general science and teacher resources. They publish and sell educational software developed by some of the world’s leading science and education institutions, and under Earth Science includes: GETIT (Geoscience Education Through Interactive Technology) which uses interactive, inquiry-based activities that closely simulate real-life research practices and incorporate simulations of advanced research in earthquakes, plate tectonics, volcanoes, hurricanes, and more. In EarthView Explorer, students can investigate using recent and authentic global data relevant to the geosphere; hydrosphere, biosphere; atmosphere and climate. Students can modify the view of the global data, sample or graph numeric data, and interact with a model of global climate.
www.learningteam.org/index.html
Careers – The American Geosciences Institute has a short, printable career brochure entitled “What Do Geoscientists Do?” with neat links on the right side for more specific information.
earthinspace.org/careers/
Earth Science Flashcards – from Flashcard Exchange, find over 90 flashcard sets for testing knowledge in geology, astronomy, oceanography, and meteorology. Available in an html and java format, the cards won’t tap higher order thinking skills and some of the flashcard answers lack depth; still, this site is a quick way to gauge subject matter mastery. It is also a good site to have brighter students critique: what is wrong with a flashcard answer and why? Flashcards are also available for the humanities, languages, and the humanities. (Audience: middle school and up)
flashcardexchange.com/directory.jsp?id=46
The CDE (Colorado Dept. of Education) – has a Science section that includes “Standards in Action” highlighting papers from the ERIC Digest of interest to science teachers. These include “Teaching Science Through Inquiry”, “Earth Systems Education”, “Teaching Evolution in School Science Classes” and “Teaching Science in the Field.”
www.cde.state.co.us/action/curric/sci/eric.htm
American Museum of Natural History – Visit their Web site for a free, easy-to-navigate online database of the Museum’s scientific and educational materials. Includes hands-on activities for all ages, curriculum materials, interactive stimulations, videos of scientists at work, etc.
www.amnh.org/education/resources

Secondary

Earth Science in General

Lesson Plans

Reaction Paper – A way to get students to read and comprehend literature on earth science related topics. Teachers can customize for their current needs and for other subjects. Emphasizes the importance of reading and staying aware of current events.

Open-Ended Scientific Method Lab — An introduction to the nature of science and the terms hypothesis, experiment, observation, and inference.

Lesson Plan Links

Nature of Science – Understanding how science works allows one to easily distinguish science from non-science. Thus, to understand evolution, or any other science, it is essential to begin with the nature of science.
http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evosite/nature/index.shtml
Teachers Domain – WGBH has released the new Earth and Space Science collection, with over 200 media-rich resources and 20 lesson plans for K-12 classrooms.
www.teachersdomain.org
Geoteach extra credit earth science worksheet. Great activities kids can do on their own.
www.geolor.com/geoteach/Geoteach_Earth_Science_Extra_Credit_Page_geolor.htm
How to Organize an Earth History Course – A module from Carleton College to help instructors who are developing or modifying courses or units on Earth history/historical geology or on contemporary topics that benefit from a historical perspective.
http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/earthhistory/
An Earth Scientist’s Periodic Table of the Elements and Their Ions – Author’s site has a link to the table with descriptive pop-ups to help users understand this unique periodic table. Go to “Online table with pop-ups”. (Also available for purchase in the GSA Bookstore.)
www.gly.uga.edu/railsback/PT.html
Science Review Games – Neat Earth science related review games, in the form of sports games like soccer or basketball.
sciencereviewgames.com/srg/
Jefferson Lab Games and Puzzles – by Jefferson Labs — Find a collection of on-line games for the retention of the elements and the periodic table. Examples includes element flash cards, hangman, matching and crossword puzzles. Other math and science games are also found at the site. (Audience: middle school and high school)
education.jlab.org/indexpages/elementgames.html
Measure the Circumference of the Earth: The Noon Day Project – This great activity is an opportunity for students to see how mathematics and science work together in explaining a real world phenomenon. (Recommended Grade Levels 5-12 but all are invited to participate).
www.k12science.org/noonday/
Try a Science Snack – Snacks are miniature science exhibits that teachers could make using common, inexpensive, easily available materials. By using Snacks in their classrooms, teachers can climb out of the textbooks and join their students in discovering science for themselves.
www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/

Secondary

Earth Science in General

Additional Resources

GSA is not responsible for content on web sites linked from our site. However, please contact us if you encounter broken links.

Internet Sites Integrative Science Sustainability Books Careers
101 Amazing Earth Facts – Example: What was the deadliest known earthquake? The world’s deadliest recorded earthquake occurred in 1556 in central China. It struck a region where most people lived in caves carved from soft rock. The dwellings collapsed, killing an estimated 830,000 people.
www.space.com/scienceastronomy/101_earth_facts_030722-1.html
American Museum of Natural History – Visit their Web site for a free, easy-to-navigate online database of the Museum’s scientific and educational materials. Includes hands-on activities for all ages, curriculum materials, interactive stimulations, videos of scientists at work, etc.
www.amnh.org/education/resources
Ask A Geologist (USGS) – You can browse through a collected set of frequently asked questions. In addition, you can e-mail, phone or fax a specific question that is not covered. You may also write to the Subaru Distinguished Earth Science Teacher for education related questions.
ask.usgs.gov/faqs.html
The California Geotour – is an interactive index of Web page links to online California geologic field trip guides and geology related Web sites. The Web pages listed in the index are grouped by the California Geologic Provinces. Developed by the Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.
www.conservation.ca.gov/cgs/geotour
Case Studies in Science – National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science: Find a variety of case studies on different subjects. In geology you will find high interest case studies on the dams, landslides, sinkholes, and the killer Lake Nyos. There are cases in Astronomy, Meteorology, Environment and many more. Sections to help you use case studies include “Guidelines for Using Our Cases,” “Guidelines for Submitting a Case,” which actually provides more information on how to use case studies in addition to submission requirements.
ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/projects/cases/ubcase.htm
Daylight Savings – Clear and concise explanations. See how daylight savings affects different latitudes differently with an animation found under “rationale.”
webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/index.html
Digital Library for Earth System Education – A library of digitally accessible resources for learning about the Earth system, and an open, organized community of users. This community, composed of educators, students, and developers of technology and content, is engaged in building the library at all levels.
www.dlese.org
Doable Demos – Paper Plate Science: And you thought paper plates were only for hot dogs and watermelon? Find a variety of science/math based lessons ranging from addition to creating directions of Earth and sky to wind roses. Cheap as a paper plate.
analyzer.depaul.edu/paperplate/activities.htm
Doppler Effect – Description and set of animations illustrating Doppler Effect and its uses.
www.kettering.edu/~drussell/Demos/doppler/doppler.html
Earth Explorers Series – Profiles an atmospheric scientist who flies through hurricanes, an engineer who operates a spectro-radiometer (an instrument on a satellite), an ocean scientist, high school students whose science fair project took them to Croatia, & other “Earth explorers.” (NASA)
science.hq.nasa.gov/education/earth_explorers/
Earthguide – a collection of links, articles, and other materials amassed by the undergrads at the Univ. of Cal., San Diego. Lacks lesson plans, but has some good links to informational sites and some interesting articles with unusual connections to earth science.
www.earthguide.ucsd.edu
Earth Observatory – NASA.
earthobservatory.nasa.gov/
Earth Science Flashcards – from Flashcard Exchange, find over 90 flashcard sets for testing knowledge in geology, astronomy, oceanography, and meteorology. Available in an html and java format, the cards won’t tap higher order thinking skills and some of the flashcard answers lack depth; still, this site is a quick way to gauge subject matter mastery. It is also a good site to have brighter students critique: what is wrong with a flashcard answer and why? Flashcards are also available for the humanities, languages, and the humanities. (Audience: middle school and up)
flashcardexchange.com/directory.jsp?id=46
Earth Science Internet Campus – from EOA Scientific Systems, Find a series of clever, interactive, shockwave animations, ranging in size from 36 K to 2000 K, that can be used to introduce the following concepts:
1. Earth: Earthquakes, Seismic Waves and Activity, Earthquake Epicenter; Tectonic Plates and Tectonic Mapping; Glaciers; Hydrological Cycle;
2. Ocean: Sea Pressure and Depth; Secchi Disk; Animal Adaptations – Animals Which Camouflage; Fill the Earth with Oceans;
3. Atmosphere: Variations of Tropospheric Thickness; Temperature of the Atmosphere; Wind Direction – The Jet Stream / Jet Stream Map; The Coriolis Effect; Sun’s Radiation on Earth – Angle of Incidence/solar altitude; Weather Education, Facts and Trivia; Lightning Game;
4. Space: The Solar System Planets; Satellite Remote Sensing / Taking Satellite Pictures;
5. Science: Periodic Table of Elements; Weight Mass Volume Density Gravity; Characteristics of All Waves. www.eoascientific.com/prototype/newcampus/campus.html and then look for “interactive exercises” under the “earth,” “ocean,” “atmosphere,” “space,” and “science” links. Audience: Middle School and Up. Need a classroom of powerful computers, will have you download Shockwave.
Earth Science Page – E. Ramapo Central SD: Great lesson plans, computer labs, and links to additional information at:
www.eram.k12.ny.us/education/staff/staff.php?sectionid=2149
Earth Science Picture of the Day: Each day a different image or photograph is featured, with an accompanying caption, which deals with various topics in Earth Science:
http://epod.usra.edu/
Earth Science Reference Tables – This fascinating resource is compiled for assistance on the New York Regents Earth Science test, but has lots of useful information for all earth science teachers.
http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/osa/reftable/esrtchart.htm
Earth Science Share-a-thon – Earth science teacher David Robison and his New York colleagues have assembled a lab share-a-thon web site. Any teacher can freely download teacher written and classroom tested labs and other activities covering the whole range of Earth science. Many labs include teacher tips and answer keys. A directed, student-centered inquiry mode dominates, and the activities are appropriate for most secondary students. A New York emphasis will be evident in some activities.
http://www.newyorkscienceteacher.com/sci/files/es.php
Earth Science Vocabulary Review – Includes Rock and Mineral Hangman, Astronomy Hangman, printable flash cards, etc.
www.eram.k12.ny.us/education/components/docmgr/default.php?sectiondetailid=30712
EarthNet – A product of the Natural Resources Department of Canada. This organization is analogous to the USGS in the United States. This site has a wide range of activities and text that can be downloaded. Every major topic in the Earth Sciences is covered. The site content is best suited to students in grade levels 7 through 11 however, there are activities that are suitable to grade 4 through 6 but would require revision to match reading level to student abilities. The content is well suited to US audiences except where there are references to provinces or typically Canadian issues.
earthnet.bio.ns.ca/index.html
Exploratorium Learning Studio Resource Guide – Earth System Science For Teachers – The Exploratorium’s Learning Studio has created several web Resource Guides for educators. “An integrated approach to the study of the Earth that stresses investigations of the interactions among the Earth’s components in order to explain Earth dynamics, evolution, and global change.” (Earth Observatory Glossary)
saturn.exploratorium.edu/ls/infosources/EarthSystemInfo.html
For a full list of our web Resource Guides for Educators, see www.exploratorium.edu/ls/infosources/ResGuides.html
Extra Credit Earth Science Assignments – Find an impressive list of short exercises for extra credit (or for credit). Exercises cover a variety of earth science topics with accompanying references. The fact that these resources are on one page makes them quite accessible.
www.geolor.com/geoteach/Geoteach_Earth_Science_Extra_Credit_Page_geolor.htm
Extreme Science – has many facts for students to look up regarding earth science, weather, space, technology, and maps. It can be a good site to use if you want your students to explore many science topics.
www.extremescience.com
Eyes of Science – This site provides science educators and their students with useful online resources to bring those vast data that scientists and educators are compiling into clearer focus for research and classroom use. Side links to feeds from science web cams, current weather conditions, astronomical events, seismic stations, science organizations, and numerous health, social and economic information services help monitor our dynamic Earth.
homepage.mac.com/ear2ground/iblog/B595170230/
Game Based Learning, SERC: This area of the Starting Point site is written to assist geoscience faculty who want to start using games to help them teach. Game-based learning uses competitive exercises, either pitting the students against each other or getting them to challenge themselves in order to motivate them to learn better.
serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/games/index.html
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Portal –
www.gisdevelopment.net/
Geology.com – a site with many geologic links, including “geology basics”.
www.geology.com/
Homeschooling Units: A list of science units of study on a variety of topics:
HomeschoolingOnAShoestring.com/science.html
Houghton Mifflin: Geology chapters that link to numerous topical class lectures, Web sites, references, news items, organizations, and glossaries.
college.hmco.com/geology/resources/geologylink/toc.html
How the Foucault Pendulum Works
www.calacademy.org/products/pendulum/page7.htm#floor
Jacques Cousteau Coastal Education Center – (Tuckerton, NJ) 2003 opportunities for educational materials and programs to promote lifelong learning about the ocean sciences.
marine.rutgers.edu/cousteau/education/education.htm
The Learning Team – is a publisher of inquiry-based science software, including physics, earth science, environmental science, general science and teacher resources. They publish and sell educational software developed by some of the world’s leading science and education institutions, and under Earth Science includes: GETIT (Geoscience Education Through Interactive Technology) which uses interactive, inquiry-based activities that closely simulate real-life research practices and incorporate simulations of advanced research in earthquakes, plate tectonics, volcanoes, hurricanes, and more. In EarthView Explorer, students can investigate using recent and authentic global data relevant to the geosphere; hydrosphere, biosphere; atmosphere and climate. Students can modify the view of the global data, sample or graph numeric data, and interact with a model of global climate.
www.learningteam.org/index.html
The Learning Web (USGS) – Part of the USGS system; this particular section specifically offers lesson plans and activities for teacher to use with students. There is a link to featured careers in the geosciences called “Scientists in Action” which gives vignettes of real people doing real science.
www.usgs.gov/education/
Magic School Bus site “What on Earth” – volcanoes, ecology and weather:
www.scholastic.com/magicschoolbus/tour/tour.htm?earth
NASA Earth Explorers: Equal to the Task – Read about University of Connecticut oceanographer Heidi Dierssen who is showing that women are as capable as men in math and science. With funding from NASA, she studies how satellites in space can be used for large-scale monitoring of seagrass – flowering plants growing on the seafloor – in shallow coastal waters. Seagrass has decreased over the years as a result of coastal development, stormwater runoff from the land, boating and other water recreation, invasive species and disease. The Earth Explorer articles are written for different reading levels (K-4, 5-8, and 9-12). Scroll down to the current article and click on the grade level that you want.
science.hq.nasa.gov/education/earth_explorers/
NSF Special Reports – Presents web-based reports on language & linguistics, Einstein & physics, weather patterns, the chemistry of water, the 2004 tsunami, arctic climate research, Admiral Byrd’s historic flight to the South Pole (1929), cyberinfrastructure, fossils, earthquake engineering simulation, ecology of infectious diseases, robotics, visualization of research results & scientific phenomena, the world’s first electronic nervous system, teacher institutes, & Nobel prize winners. (NSF)
www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/
Open Access Journals – Lund University Libraries. This service covers free, full text, quality controlled scientific and scholarly journals. The site aims to cover all subjects and languages. Journals in Earth Sciences, Ecology, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Geology, Geophysics and Geomagnetism, Meteorology and Climatology, and Oceanography.
www.doaj.org/ljbs?cpid=78
Powerpoint Games: Jeopardy, etc., templates that you can use to create games for your classes.
jc-schools.net/tutorials/PPT-games/
PUMAS – The Practical Uses of Math and Science – An online journal of short examples of everyday applications to math and science. Many of the topics are earth science related. The examples are developed by university faculty and have wonderful interdisciplinary connections. You can search the examples by age group and by the National Science Benchmarks by following this link to PUMAS Examples page that then leads to the PUMAS Examples Search Page.
pumas.jpl.nasa.gov/
Real-Time Information – Helps ensure that critical information needed by emergency forecasters & managers during extreme events is available. See “live” views of volcanoes around the world, weather images, geologic & mineral resource information, national flood-threat forecasts, & streamflow information. (USGS)
interactive2.usgs.gov/learningweb/explorer/topic_realtime.asp
Resources for Earth Science and Geography Instruction – These links are organized around the sequence of topics typically taught in an introductory earth science or physical geography class. Links are also available for environmental science, earth science/geography education, career opportunities, and more. The sites selected are based on image quality, ease with which lesson plans can be developed, organization, authenticity, scope, and format.
personal.cmich.edu/~franc1m/homepage.htm
Rubrics – This site has a collection of rubric examples, including some for science classes, from the Educator’s Network.
http://www.theeducatorsnetwork.com/main/rubricfeature.htm
Science Fairs – Madeline Binder announces the launch of a new website, which is designed to help middle school, jr. high and high school students through the intricacies of science fair projects one step at a time, also includes a parents guide and a teachers resource page.
www.super-science-fair-projects.com
Science Games – Go to this site for the following games and game templates: Science Jeopardy, Science Taboo, Science Bingo, Science Monopoly, Science Bowl and more.
www.csun.edu/~vceed002/ref/games/index.html#Jeopardy
Science Powerpoints, CFAT – Find a variety of PowerPoint presentations for a number of different science topics in chemistry, earth science, biology, and physics.
Chemistry Powerpoint Presentations: sun.menloschool.org/~cfat/powerpoint/chemistry/powerpoint.html
Earth Science Powerpoint Presentations: sun.menloschool.org/~cfat/powerpoint/earth_science/powerpoint.html
Physics Powerpoint Presentations: its.fvtc.edu/physics/presents.htm
Science misconceptions:
www.amasci.com/miscon/opphys.html
Science Outlook – This site pulls together headline newsfeeds in six categories, General Science, Technology, Health, Environment, Education and Space. There are no pop-up ads on the site.
www.scienceoutlook.com
Science & Nature (CNN) – Contains a section that advises the reader about volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and other earth phenomena during the past week. It is a good starting place for research or a place to re-check during a long project. It is useful for all age groups and in teaching both science and geography. See their science and space page also.
www.cnn.com/TECH/
Smithsonian Museum of Natural History – Contains a varied amount of information that does change with time. It is most appropriate to students in grades 7 -12. Most intriguing are the virtual field trips through the museum. The site also allows the user to enter a keyword and search for information.
www.mnh.si.edu/
Steve Spangler Science – Colorado science whiz site has ideas for demos and activities. Great ideas for special holiday science too.
www.stevespanglerscience.com
StudyStack – provides free online educational activities for data that users enter. Activities include flashcards, hangman, word search, crosswords, and matching. Flashcards can also be exported to cell phones, iPods, and PDAs.
www.studystack.com
A Tapestry of Time & Terrain: Geology of the United States: Excellent Web site with the geologic map of the U.S. and highlights about certain features. You can also purchase the Tapestry of Time puzzle from the GSA Bookstore.
tapestry.usgs.gov/
Tasa Graphic Arts Company – Tasa Graphic Arts Co. has produced state of the art multimedia products for use in the Earth Science and Environment Science Classrooms. Of particular interest is the Plate Tectonics puzzle, interactive CD-ROM on Mineral Identification and topographic map study. They provide online ordering. To receive a 15% discount for teachers who visit the GSA website, contact Tasa Graphic Arts to receive a special web address and discount code.
e:mail: info@tasagraphicarts.com, Phone: 1-800-293-2725 or 1-505-758-5535.
Tools For Teachers – changes weekly, look up past tools, like certificate making, or the crossword puzzle maker
www.theeducatorsnetwork.com/main/toolfeature.htm
Tutorials on Earth Science Subjects:
teach.fcps.net/trt20/projects/EKU/
The Understanding Evolution web site – written for teachers but accessible to the general public — is intended to provide “one-stop shopping” for evolution education. The web site is rich in content, with sections on the nature of science, evolution itself, the different lines of evidence supporting evidence, evolution’s relevance to everyday life, widespread misconceptions about evolution, and the history of evolutionary thought.
evolution.berkeley.edu
United States Geologic Survey (USGS) – A vast site and the government is offering a great deal of both information and products that can be used by teachers and students. One can purchase maps, aerial photos of specific areas, download free teaching and learning materials, access information about all areas of Geoscience and link to other relevant sites. Teachers of all levels can find suitable materials. Middle and high school students can use this site for research. Elementary students should not be sent here without very specific guidance.
www.usgs.gov/
Visible Earth (NASA) – A compilation of satellite images from around the world that has been shot with various sensors. This site can provide interesting images for use in lessons and can also be used in research by middle and high school students. Elementary students may be able to use the site with adult support. The images are quite varied and can be searched by location and subject. For example, images can be used to study plant distribution in the oceans or the effect of forest fires.
visibleearth.nasa.gov/
The Why Files – An email magazine focusing on the science behind the latest news headlines.
whyfiles.org/teach/index.html

Internet Sites Integrative Science Sustainability Books Careers
The Earth Institute at Columbia University – is the world’s leading academic center for the integrated study of Earth, its environment, and society. The Earth Institute builds upon excellence in the core disciplines–earth sciences, biological sciences, engineering sciences, social sciences and health sciences–and stresses cross-disciplinary approaches to complex problems.
www.earthinstitute.columbia.edu/about/about.html
Earth System Science Program at Stanford – An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Major with Coterminal Master’s Degree.
pangea.stanford.edu/ESYS/
The Physics Classroom Tutorial – is an online physics tutorial written for high school physics students. This virtual physics classroom offers an online tutorial of high school physics concepts, from kinematics to waves to reflection and refraction of light. It also features a multimedia studio that uses animations and other graphics to help students visualize abstract physics concepts.
www.physicsclassroom.com/Default2.html
RIDGE2000 – R2K is a community-based science initiative focused on integrated geological and biological studies of the Earth-encircling mid-ocean ridge system.
r2k.bio.psu.edu/

Internet Sites Integrative Science Sustainability Books Careers
Smart Communities Network (Dept. of Energy) – how your community can adopt sustainable development as a strategy for well-being.
www.sustainable.doe.gov/
Earth Council – Earth Council programs include The Earth Charter, The International Ombudsman Centre for the Environment and Development, and the National Councils for Sustainable Development.
www.ecouncil.ac.cr/
Earth Vision – Headlines for sustainability.
www.earthvision.net/5488.cfm
Global Environment and Technology Foundation – a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation. We are making a difference by promoting the development and use of innovative technology to achieve sustainable development. For over a decade, GETF has brought industry, government and communities together to address environmental challenges with innovative solutions.
www.getf.org/
Sustainable Colorado – Colorado’s sustainable development information clearinghouse.
sustainablecolorado.org
Toward a Stewardship of the Global Commons – Essays on sustainability. Includes essays by Pete Palmer.
bcn.boulder.co.us/basin/local/sustainintro.html
World Watch Institute – World Watch is a non-profit public policy research organization dedicated to informing policymakers and the public about emerging global problems and trends and the complex links between the world economy and its environmental support systems.
www.worldwatch.org/about/
World Conservation Monitoring Centre – The UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre provides information for policy and action to conserve the living world. Their programs concentrate on species, forests, protected areas, marine, mountains and freshwaters; plus habitats affected by climate change such as polar regions. We also address the relationship between trade and the environment and the wider aspects of biodiversity assessment.
www.unep-wcmc.org/

Internet Sites Integrative Science Sustainability Books Careers

Ready to Use Earth and Astronomical Science Activities for Grades 5-12, by Mark J. Handwerker. This five-volume series provides 300 tested lessons and over 600 reproducible fact sheets, worksheets, homework assignments, and review quizzes to help you teach basic scientific concepts and develop students’ appreciation and understanding of the work done by generations of curious scientists. All volumes emphasize the “process” of science and offer 15 uniformly formatted teaching units covering 15 major topics in a specific area of science. Spiral-bound, 256 pages, February 199, Center for Applied Research in Education. 8-1/4 ” x 11 “, ISBN: 0876284454. $29.95 at Prentice-Hall Direct, Title Code: C44549. (phdirect.com)

Project Earth: Science Geology, by Brent A. Ford. NSTA Press (http://store.nsta.org), Arlington VA, ISBN: 0873551311; Explain what it’s like between a rock and a hard place! Use Project Earth Science: Geology to introduce your students to plate tectonics and teach them what causes volcanoes and earthquakes. Lead explorations of these and other larger-than-the-classroom geological phenomena with the teacher-tested, Standards-based activities. Earth’s physical evolution and dynamic processes are carefully explained in language accessible to students and teachers. Supplemental readings provide educators with the background information to answer student questions and concerns. 224 pp. Also in the Project Earth Science series: Meteorology, Physical Oceanography and Astronomy.

The Teacher-Friendly Guide to the Geology of the Northeastern U.S. by Jane Ansley, 2000. Written as a teacher preparation and information resource, this guide provides teachers with background on the regional geology of the Northeast. Ties in national science education standards and inquiry-based teaching. Contains corresponding student activities for each topic. Designed for middle and high school level science teachers but applicable to any level. Paleontological Research Institution Publications, 1259 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850; (www.priweb.org), $25.

The Basics of Inquiry, Measurement, and Science Math – The book contains hands-on exercises that teach the basics of experimental design, measurement, and scientific figures, as well as the math and graphing skills needed to analyze data. Purchase for $14.95 from Health-Science Education, Inc., 5500 Prytania St., PMB 213, New Orleans, LA 70115; 504-897-0211; fax 504-897-0211; e-mail: hesci@bellsouth.net; www.healthscience.net.

Internet Sites Integrative Science Sustainability Books Careers
Careers – The American Geosciences Institute has a short, printable career brochure entitled “What Do Geoscientists Do?” with links on the right side for more specific information.
earthinspace.org/careers/
GSA Employment Service –
www.geosociety.org/links/careers.htm
GSA Classified Ads –
www.geosociety.org/links/careers.htm
Links to Science, Technology and Society programs – at universities worldwide.
www.ncsu.edu/ncsu/chass/mds/stsprog.html
Other Career Links –
www.geosociety.org/links/careers.htm

Elementary

Earthquakes and Volcanoes

Lesson Plans

A Griddle Earth – Use pancake batter to demonstrate the Earth.

Lesson Plan Links

Volcanoes – Classic plan to make a volcano in the classroom
http://school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/understanding/

Elementary

Earthquakes & Volcanoes

Additional Resources

Program Download:
Seismic wave program: A program for the visualization of seismicity and volcanic activity in space and time. The program, which runs under Windows 95/98/NT/2000/XP, has an extensive database of events. A number of pre-defined maps are included which illustrate the seismicity in various parts of the earth.
www.geol.binghamton.edu/faculty/jones/
Michigan Tech’s Volcanoes Page aims to provide information about volcanoes to the public and to complement other informational sites on the web. Links to updated information on real volcanoes and to volcano cams.
www.geo.mtu.edu/volcanoes/
When You’re Hot – For over 120 years, Mount Saint Helens, a beautiful, snow-covered peak in Washington State, remained calm. Then on May 18, 1980, people heard a loud explosion as hot rock, gas and ash shot into the air. Mount Saint Helens had “woken up.” Elementary and younger middle school students investigate volcanoes, meet a volcanologist and even make edible crystals on this part of Our Dynamic Planet, which includes links to other volcano-oriented sites.
www.amnh.org/education/resources/rfl.php

Intermediate

Earthquakes & Volcanoes

Lesson Plan Links

Deformational Sandbox – Exploring Geologic Processes with a Deformational Sandbox.
http://sci.gallaudet.edu/GIS/Sandbox.html
Earth to Class – Selected Lab & Activities on earthquakes, volcanoes and plate tectonics.
http://earth2class.org/curr_units/
Earthquake Learning module – with discussion of Moho boundary, exact p & s wave velocities
http://www.uky.edu/AS/Geology/howell/goodies/elearning/module06swf.swf
Earthquakes & Volcanoes: A lesson plan from National Geographic.
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/15/g35/earthquakes.html
Earthquakes: Getting Ready for the Big One – Understand the different types of earthquake waves and the impact they can have; understanding building design in earthquake areas.
http://school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonplans/programs/earthquakes-gettingready/
Earthquakes: Learning from the Past, Prepare for the Future – Need Internet access, maps; Students research, question and answer with teacher to learn about earthquakes. For motivated classes.
http://school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/earthquakes/
Earthshaking Events – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, Feb. 2001 p. 33. Students create their own version of a seismograph to understand how scientists use this tool to measure earthquake vibrations. National Science Education Standard D: Earth and Space Science-Structure of the earth system.
http://www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/mojave/mojave02a.html
 
Generate your own seismic hazards maps:
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/research/hazmaps/interactive/cmaps/custom2002_2006.php
Google Earth files: — This website contains information on faults and associated folds in the United States that are believed to be sources of M>6 earthquakes during the Quaternary (the past 1,600,000 years). Maps of these geologic structures are linked to detailed descriptions and references.
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/qfaults
IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) – Lessons and Resources
http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources
A Model of Three Faults – Students will observe fault movements on a model of the earth’s surface. Teacher needs to print the model page from the Web site.
http://www.earthsciweek.org/forteachers/faults_cont.html
Surfing for Earthquakes and Volcanoes by Patty Coe and Michael Merrick. Intended for 6-8 graders Students use the Internet to research data on earthquakes and volcanoes and plot locations to determine continental plate boundaries. Extensions include interpretation of interaction between plate boundaries, causes of earthquakes and volcanoes, and the comparison of the formation of Olympus Mons on Mars and the Hawaiian volcanic chain.
http://cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/SegwayEd/
Volcano! – Understanding volcanoes, why they erupt, and their effect on civilization.
http://school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonplans/programs/volcano/
Volcano World – Everything volcanos! This terrific Web site includes downloadable HyperStudio stacks, lesson plans, and a great FAQ section.
http://volcano.oregonstate.edu//

Intermediate

Earthquakes & Volcanoes

Additional Resources

CDs Internet Sites Books Videos
Explore Volcanoes – Are you teaching about volcanoes, but need a little more background yourself? Or are you looking for some exciting volcano activities, diagrams, models, or photographs to enhance your lessons? Add some pizzazz and ‘real-time’ volcano activities to your course by using this resource-packed CD-ROM. Full teacher notes, reproducible student activities and suggest answers in PDF format are complimented by forty fantastic volcano images and diagrams to use in your classroom. Have students construct 3D models of seven different volcanic features including a stratoform volcano, shield volcano, and caldera. Provide them with a color template, or have them color one themselves!. This resource has been developed by school teachers and the matierals are curriculum linked to the Earth and Space Science and Science in Personal and Social Perspectives standards (Grades 5-8, 9-12). On Sale! $9.95.
CDs Internet Sites Books Videos
The Community Preparedness Website Project – Disaster preparedness information.
www.preparenow.org
Earthquake Shakes Kilauea Volcano – Article for grades 6 and up. Investigate Kilauea, one of Hawaii’s younger hotspot volcanoes; find out how hotspots form; and find out how Kilauea has been behaving-and misbehaving-lately. EarthBulletins include articles, images, photos, and video.
www.amnh.org/education/resources/rfl.php
Earthquake Hazards 101- A 2-level hazards primer on how to find out information and what it means.
Includes info for all audiences and info for building and safety planners
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/research/hazmaps/haz101/
Encarta article about volcanoes.
encarta.msn.com/encnet/refpages/refarticle.aspx?refid=761570122
Free online publications:
Earthquakes: pubs.usgs.gov/gip/earthq1/
The Interior of the Earth: pubs.usgs.gov/gip/interior/
The San Andreas Fault: pubs.usgs.gov/gip/earthq3/
The Severity of an Earthquake: pubs.usgs.gov/gip/earthq4/severitygip.html
List of earthquakes, books, resources and children’s books. www.calacademy.org/research/library/biodiv/biblio/quake.htm
Generate your own seismic hazards maps:
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/research/hazmaps/interactive/cmaps/custom2002_2006.php
Global Volcanism Program – Smithsonian Institute: This well-organized, image rich site documents the Holocene eruption history of the world’s major volcanoes. Be sure to explore the pull down menus on the red title bar beneath page titles to see all the information this site has. A special feature of this site is a GIS-like mapping tool. To access the tool, select a region of the world, then pick a particular volcano. Once on andual volcano page, select the “Maps” option. The “Map Tool” button links to the UNAVCO Jules Verne Voyager mapping application and displays a map centered on the current volcano. Java must be enabled in your browser to display the maps.
Global Volcanism Project – A Smithsonian Institute program. Contains Volcanoes of the World, information on volcanoes that have been active for the last 10,000 years, and Volcanic Activity Reports.
www.volcano.si.edu/gvp/
Google Earth files:
This website contains information on faults and associated folds in the United States that are believed to be sources of M>6 earthquakes during the Quaternary (the past 1,600,000 years). Maps of these geologic structures are linked to detailed descriptions and references.
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/qfaults
Investigating Earthquakes: GIS Mapping and Analysis – This site describes the technique of preparing “GIS-ready” data and shows how to map that data and conduct basic analyses using a geographic information system (GIS). Users download and format near real-time and historical earthquake data from the USGS. They use latitude and longitude fields to plot the data in a GIS. They analyze patterns by querying records and overlaying datasets. The focus of the chapter’s case study is earthquake prediction. Users examine earthquake distributions, monitor current earthquake activity, and try to predict where the next big earthquake will occur on Earth.
serc.carleton.edu/eet/earthquakes/
Michigan Tech’s Volcanoes Page aims to provide information about volcanoes to the public and to complement other informational sites on the web. Links to updated information on real volcanoes and to volcano cams.
www.geo.mtu.edu/volcanoes/
NASA- Global Tectonic Activity Map of the Earth.
http://denali.gsfc.nasa.gov/dtam/data/ftp/gtam.pdf
Northern California Earthquake Data Center
quake.geo.berkeley.edu/
The Southern California Integrated GPS Network Education Module – This site was designed to allow students to interactively learn about Plate Tectonics and related phenomena. There are learning modules and activity modules. Students who function at many different levels can use this site.
scign.jpl.nasa.gov/learn/
United States Geological Survey – A tour of volcanoes in the United States. It is an excellent tutorial in volcanism. Teachers will find this site useful as will middle and high school students. This site also includes a great tutorial on Plate Tectonics.
volcanoes.usgs.gov/
pubs.usgs.gov/gip/volcus/
USGS list of recent earthquakes
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/neic/
U.S. Volcanic Parks and Monuments.
volcano.und.nodak.edu/monuments.html
Volcanic Features of Hawaii and Other Worlds – Lunar and Planetary Institute. Find forty wonderful volcanic slides you can download. Slide topics include Volcanic Structures and Landforms (Slides 32-40), Radar Studies of Lava Flows (Slides 26-31), Rocks and Boulder Fields (Slides 21-25), Eruption Types and Resultant Landforms (Slides 1-20).
www.lpi.usra.edu/publications/slidesets/hawaiivolcanoes/index.shtml
www.volcano.si.edu/
Volcano information from the PBS Series “Savage Earth”.
www.wnet.org/savageearth/volcanoes/index.html
Volcano World – This is a link to the Kid’s Door of Volcano World. Lots of neat info and pictures you can print.
http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/oldroot/kids/index.html
Volcanoes – Page & Moy, resources about volcanoes.
http://www.pageandmoy.com/articles/volcanoes.aspx
Wave That Shook the World, Nova – This website is based on the TV program originally aired on March 29, 2005 and tells the story of the 2004 tsunami, featuring video footage and scientific analysis of the onrushing waves that spread for 3,000 miles around the Indian Ocean basin. NOVA uses detailed animation to show how the quake raised a portion of the seafloor, which also lifted all the water lying above it.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tsunami
When You’re Hot – For over 120 years, Mount Saint Helens, a beautiful, snow-covered peak in Washington State, remained calm. Then on May 18, 1980, people heard a loud explosion as hot rock, gas and ash shot into the air. Mount Saint Helens had “woken up.” Elementary and younger middle school students investigate volcanoes, meet a volcanologist and even make edible crystals on this part of Our Dynamic Planet, which includes links to other volcano-oriented sites.
www.amnh.org/education/resources/rfl.php
 
CDs Internet Sites Books Videos

Assembling California by McPhee, John. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 1993.

Discovering Earthquakes: Mysteries, Secret Codes, Games, Mazes, by Field, Nancy, and Adele Schepige. Middletown, WI: Dog-Eared Publications. 1995.

Earth, by Grimshaw, Caroline. Grades 4-7. Deals with basic geoscience questions such as the origin of Earth and geological/biological changes through time. Paperback: ISBN 0716613050, Hardcover: ISBN 1568474539.

Earthquake! An Event Based Science Module, by Wright, Russell G. Menlo Park, CA: Innovative Learning Publications, Addison-Wesley, 1996. Public QE535.W74 1996.Earthquakes: Tremor Troop, by Callister, J.C., et. al. Washington D.C.: National Science Teachers Association. 1988.

Janice VanCleave’s Earthquakes: Mind-Boggling Experiments You Can Turn into Science Fair Projects, by VanCleave, Janice. Grades 4-7. Twenty simple experiments explaining earthquakes that kids can do with materials found in the home. Paperback: ISBN 0471571075.

Project Earth: Science Geology, by Ford, Brent A. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association Press. 1996.

Uncovering the San Andreas Fault, National Park Service. A field guide for Middle School Science Teachers. Point Reyes National Seashore Association. 2001. Can be obtained by participating in a teacher workshop at Point Reyes National Seashore. www.nps.gov/pore.

Volcano & Earthquake, by Van Rose, Susanna. Grades 4-7. Discusses where and how earthquakes and volcanoes occur, prediction, and human interaction with these natural phenomena. Hardcover: ISBN 0679816852.

Volcano: The Eruption & Healing of Mount St. Helens, by Lauber, Patricia. Grades 4-7. Beautiful photographs and information about the eruption and aftermath of Mount St. Helens. Paperback: ISBN 0689716796.

CDs Internet Sites Books Videos
Program Download:
Seismic wave program: A program for the visualization of seismicity and volcanic activity in space and time. The program, which runs under Windows 95/98/NT/2000/XP, has an extensive database of events. A number of pre-defined maps are included which illustrate the seismicity in various parts of the earth.
www.geol.binghamton.edu/faculty/jones/

Secondary

Earthquakes & Volcanoes

Lesson Plans

“What’s Shakin’, Dude?” (9-12) – Students will create their own P- & S-wave travel chart and develop a better understanding of the relationship between these two earthquake wave types, travel times, and travel distances.

Real Evidence of a Subducting Plate (9-12) – Hands-on approach to examining real earthquake evidence of the South American subduction zone where the Nazca Plate and the South American Plate are colliding. With this activity you can see how geologists came up with the idea of a subducting slab.

Lesson Plan Links

Earth to Class – Selected Lab & Activities on earthquakes, volcanoes and plate tectonics.
http://earth2class.org/curr_units/
Earthquakes: Learning from the Past, Prepare for the Future. – Need Internet access, maps; Students research, question and answer with teacher to learn about earthquakes. For motivated classes.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/earthquakes/
Earthshaking Events – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, Feb. 2001 p. 33. Students create their own version of a seismograph to understand how scientists use this tool to measure earthquake vibrations. National Science Education Standard D: Earth and Space Science-Structure of the earth system.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/mojave/mojave02a.html
Earth Science Education Demonstrations, Lessons and Activities – Great earthquake lessons from Dr. Larry Braile.
http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~braile/indexlinks/educ.htm
IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) – Lessons and Resources
http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources
A Model of Three Faults – Students will observe fault movements on a model of the earth’s surface. Teacher needs to print the model page from the Web site.
http://www.earthsciweek.org/forteachers/faults_cont.html
Volcano World Earth Science Lessons –
http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/education/vwlessons/lessons/lesson.html

Earthquakes & Volcanoes

Additional Resources

CDs Internet Sites Books
Explore Volcanoes CD-ROM
Order Yours Today!
GSA Sales and Service
(303) 357-1000
1-888-443-4472 (toll free)
303-357-1071 (fax)
Explore Volcanoes – Are you teaching about volcanoes, but need a little more background yourself? Or are you looking for some exciting volcano activities, diagrams, models, or photographs to enhance your lessons? Add some pizzazz and ‘real-time’ volcano activities to your course by using this resource-packed CD-ROM. Full teacher notes, reproducible student activities and suggest answers in PDF format are complimented by forty fantastic volcano images and diagrams to use in your classroom. Have students construct 3D models of seven different volcanic features including a stratoform volcano, shield volcano, and caldera. Provide them with a color template, or have them color one themselves!
This resource has been developed by school teachers and the matierals are curriculum linked to the Earth and Space Science and Science in Personal and Social Perspectives standards (Grades 5-8, 9-12). $9.95.
Explore Earthquakes CD-ROM
Order Yours Today!
GSA Sales and Service
(303) 357-1000
1-888-443-4472 (toll free)
303-357-1071 (fax)
Explore Earthquakes – Are you teaching about earthquakes, but can’t find what you need? If you are looking for some exciting earthquake activities, diagrams, models, or photographs to enhance your lessons, this is the CD for you.  All the very best earthquake teaching resources on one CD ROM, including fact sheets from IRIS! Teaching notes, student activities, fact sheets, images, and 3D models. Have students construct 3D models of eight different fault-blocks!.This resource has been developed by school teachers and the matierals are curriculum linked to the Earth and Space Science and Science in Personal and Social Perspectives standards (Grades 5-8, 9-12). $9.95.
CDs Internet Sites Books Videos
Alaska Earthquake Information Center – A great earthquake site!
www.aeic.alaska.edu/
Earthquake Virtual Courseware: An inquiry-based activity that helps the user learn about the fundamental concepts of how seismic waves are used to locate an earthquake’s epicenter and to determine its Richter magnitude.
http://www.sciencecourseware.org/eec/Earthquake/
Free online publications:
Earthquakes: pubs.usgs.gov/gip/earthq1/
The Interior of the Earth: pubs.usgs.gov/gip/interior/
The San Andreas Fault: pubs.usgs.gov/gip/earthq3/
The Severity of an Earthquake: pubs.usgs.gov/gip/earthq4/severitygip.html
List of earthquakes, books, resources and children’s books: www.calacademy.org/research/library/biodiv/biblio/quake.htm
Free downloadable digital slides: From the National Geophysical Data Center.
On Seismic Creep:  http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/nndc/struts/results?eq_1=23&t=101634&s=0&d=2&d=22
On Tsunami Travel Time Maps: http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/seg/hazard/tsu_travel_time.shtml#Atlantic
On Landslides: http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/nndc/struts/results?eq_1=6&t=101634&s=0&d=2&d=22
Global Volcanism Program – Smithsonian Institute: This well-organized, image rich site documents the Holocene eruption history of the world’s major volcanoes. Be sure to explore the pull down menus on the red title bar beneath page titles to see all the information this site has. A special feature of this site is a GIS-like mapping tool. To access the tool, select a region of the world, then pick a particular volcano. Once on an individual volcano page, select the “Maps” option. The “Map Tool” button links to the UNAVCO Jules Verne Voyager mapping application and displays a map centered on the current volcano. Java must be enabled in your browser to display the maps.
www.volcano.si.edu/
Investigating Earthquakes: GIS Mapping and Analysis – This site describes the technique of preparing “GIS-ready” data and shows how to map that data and conduct basic analyses using a geographic information system (GIS). Users download and format near real-time and historical earthquake data from the USGS. They use latitude and longitude fields to plot the data in a GIS. They analyze patterns by querying records and overlaying datasets. The focus of the chapter’s case study is earthquake prediction. Users examine earthquake distributions, monitor current earthquake activity, and try to predict where the next big earthquake will occur on Earth.
serc.carleton.edu/eet/earthquakes/
Make Your Own Seismogram – The UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory operates a network of seismometers in northern and central California.
quake.geo.berkeley.edu/bdsn/make_seismogram.html
Michigan Tech’s Volcanoes Page aims to provide information about volcanoes to the public and to complement other informational sites on the web. Links to updated information on real volcanoes and to volcano cams.
www.geo.mtu.edu/volcanoes/
Northern California Earthquake Data Center –
quake.geo.berkeley.edu/
The Southern California Integrated GPS Network Education Module – This site was designed to allow students to interactively learn about Plate Tectonics and related phenomena. There are learning modules and activity modules. Students who function at many different levels can use this site.
scign.jpl.nasa.gov/learn/
United States Geological Survey – A tour of volcanoes in the United States. It is an excellent tutorial in volcanism. Teachers will find this site useful as will middle and high school students. This site also includes a great tutorial on Plate Tectonics.
pubs.usgs.gov/gip/volcus/
Volcanic Features of Hawaii and Other Worlds – Lunar and Planetary Institute. Find forty wonderful volcanic slides you can download. Slide topics include Volcanic Structures and Landforms (Slides 32-40), Radar Studies of Lava Flows (Slides 26-31), Rocks and Boulder Fields (Slides 21-25), Eruption Types and Resultant Landforms (Slides 1-20).
www.lpi.usra.edu/publications/slidesets/hawaiivolcanoes/index.shtml
Wave That Shook the World, Nova – This website is based on the TV program originally aired on March 29, 2005 and tells the story of the 2004 tsunami, featuring video footage and scientific analysis of the onrushing waves that spread for 3,000 miles around the Indian Ocean basin. NOVA uses detailed animation to show how the quake raised a portion of the seafloor, which also lifted all the water lying above it.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tsunami
CDs Internet Sites Books Videos

Earthquakes: Tremor Troop, by Callister, J.C., et. al. Washington D.C.: National Science Teachers Association. 1988.

Earth, by Grimshaw, Caroline. Grades 4-7. Deals with basic geoscience questions such as the origin of Earth and geological/biological changes through time. Paperback: ISBN 0716613050, Hardcover: ISBN 1568474539.

Discovering Earthquakes: Mysteries, Secret Codes, Games, Mazes, by Field, Nancy, and Adele Schepige. Middletown, WI: Dog-Eared Publications. 1995.

Project Earth: Science Geology, by Ford, Brent A. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association Press. 1996.

Janice VanCleave’s Earthquakes: Mind-Boggling Experiments You Can Turn into Science Fair Projects, by VanCleave, Janice. Grades 4-7. Twenty simple experiments explaining earthquakes that kids can do with materials found in the home. Paperback: ISBN 0471571075.

Assembling California, by McPhee, John. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 1993.

Uncovering the San Andreas Fault, National Park Service. A field guide for Middle School Science Teachers. Point Reyes National Seashore Association. 2001. Can be obtained by participating in a teacher workshop at Point Reyes National Seashore. www.nps.gov/pore.

Earthquake! An Event Based Science Module, by Wright, Russell G. Menlo Park, CA: Innovative Learning Publications, Addison-Wesley, 1996. Public QE535.W74 1996.

CDs Internet Sites Books Videos
Program Download:
Seismic wave program: A program for the visualization of seismicity and volcanic activity in space and time. The program, which runs under Windows 95/98/NT/2000/XP, has an extensive database of events. A number of pre-defined maps are included which illustrate the seismicity in various parts of the earth.
www.geol.binghamton.edu/faculty/jones/
Earth Revealed: Continuously aired on PBS, this video series is for high school and undergraduate students. Program 9. Earthquakes- Showing actual footage of earthquakes and their aftermath, this program discusses the forces that fuel these massive events. Faults, waves, and the transfer of energy from the epicenter are explained, and histories of the seismograph and Richter scale are presented. The program also describes devices being developed to study – and eventually predict – earthquakes. Program 13: Volcanoes provide clues about what is going on inside Earth. Animations illustrate volcanic processes and how plate boundaries are related to volcanism. The program also surveys the various types of eruptions, craters, cones and vents, lava domes, magma, and volcanic rock. The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens serves as one example. Annenberg/CPB Resources; site has current broadcast dates and info on how to purchase videos, textbook, study guide, and teacher guide.

www.learner.org/resources/resource.html

Intermediate

Energy

Lesson Plans

Observing Latent Heat with a Portable Hand Warmer – Students observe a teacher-directed demonstration that provides a conceptual understanding of latent heat, the “hidden heat” present in all changes from one phase to another, by using a hand warmer; Grades 7-12.

Lesson Plan Links

WebWatchers Web Guides – Use this link to access a wonderful amount of lesson plans on a variety of energy topics such as biomass, fossil fuels, solar, etc.
learningcenter.nsta.org/
Power for a Sustainable Future – (from Australia) A list of activities and fact sheets for teachers.
www.sustainableenergy.qld.edu.au/html/activitysheets.html
lesson plans for the Intermediate level www.sustainableenergy.qld.edu.au/html/level34.html
Origin Energy – Ollie and his friends provide fun activities for students, educators and parents to learn all about energy.
www.originenergy.com.au/about/about_subnav.php?pageid=565
Energy – Fuel for Thought – 3 lesson plans on energy from the Bureau of Land Management.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/energy/index.html
Renewable and Nonrenewable Energy – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, March 1998, p. 40. In these two activities, students distinguish between energy sources that are renewable and those that are nonrenewable, and discuss costs and benefits of each type.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/Columbia_river_basin/classroom.html
How to Build a Pizza Box Solar Oven – This small solar oven is ideal for heating s’mores, warming store-bought cookies or biscuits.
www.nrel.gov/education/solar_oven.html
Finding Resources – Students will: recognize that as time goes by, energy resources usually become harder to locate and recover; conclude that the price of a particular resource directly relates to the incentive of companies to obtain it; will realize that often the obtaining of energy resources has adverse environmental consequences; will learn that technological breakthroughs commonly affect both the known energy reserves and the ability of society to utilize them; will realize that the remaining reserves of fossil fuels are hard to predict and are not known with absolute certainty.
www4.nau.edu/eeop/aqcp/assets/docs/finding_energy_resources.doc
Oil and Water in the Middle East Region (6-8)- In this lesson, students will explore the roles of oil and water in the Middle East, especially in Iraq. Students will use maps to look at the distribution of oil in the Middle East and discuss what it means for the different countries in the region. They will also examine how water has influenced the region historically (in the “fertile crescent” region between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers) and politically (for example, how Iraq’s access to water is limited to one small part of its border). Finally, they will study specific aspects of Iraq’s struggles with water, using satellite imagery to understand and illustrate the problem. Need Internet access.
www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/01/g68/iraqoil.html

Intermediate

Energy

Additional Resources

RENEWABLE ENERGY

Energy Quest – is the award-winning energy education website of the California Energy Commission. It has tremendous information on all facets of energy use.
ww.energyquest.ca.gov/about.html
The Australian Greenhouse Office – Information fact sheets for teachers about the greenhouse effect.
www.greenhouse.gov.au/education/factsheets/index.html
Renewable energy sources – a great list of resources.
www.teachers.ash.org.au/jmresources/energy/renewable.html
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy – of the U.S. Dept. of Energy. Portal to many interesting renewable energy topics.
www.eere.energy.gov/
Photovoltaic Cell Animation – Info and animation of photovoltaic solar cells from EERE.
www.eere.energy.gov/solar/photovoltaics.html
National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) – Information on education programs, research and technology, etc.
www.nrel.gov/

 URANIUM

Uranium Information Centre
www.uic.com.au/index.htm
World Nuclear Association
www.world-nuclear.org/
Wyoming Uranium
www.wma-minelife.com/uranium/uranium.html
Yucca Mountain Project (YMP)
www.ymp.gov/

ENERGY (in general)

A Student’s Guide to Alternative Fuel Vehicles – California Energy Commission. A guide to alternative fuel cars powered with alcohols – ethanol and methanol, compressed natural gas to biodiesel.
www.energyquest.ca.gov/transportation/
Energy Information Administration – Department of Energy
www.eia.doe.gov/
International Energy Agency and Statistical Information
www.eia.doe.gov/links.html
Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC)
www.fce.com/
Oil On My Shoes – This site will help you understand the science of Petroleum Geology.
www.geomore.com

FOSSIL FUELS

Office of Fossil Energy – Department of Energy
www.fe.doe.gov/
Minerals Management Service (MMS) – Department of the Interior
www.mms.gov/
National Petroleum Council
www.npc.org/
Oil & Gas International
www.oilandgasinternational.com/
FuelCell Energy Inc. – A company developing efficient fuel cells – An objective of DOE’s Vision 21 Program is to develop larger, multi-megawatt power plants that would generate electricity with net efficiencies approaching 75 percent (with natural gas), while producing sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions of less than 0.01 lb/million BTU. These goals are significant improvements over conventional power plants, which are only 35-60 percent efficient and produce emissions of 0.07 to 0.3 lb/million BTU of sulfur and nitrogen oxides (see Recent News Article 10/31/02).
www.fce.com/

ELECTRICITY

Energy Flow in the United States for year 1993
www.eia.doe.gov/gifs/elecflow.gif
Electric Power Research Institute
www.epri.com/
Electricity Energy Information Administration
www.eia.doe.gov/fuelelectric.html

Secondary

Energy

Lesson Plans

Observing Latent Heat with a Portable Hand Warmer – Students observe a teacher-directed demonstration that provides a conceptual understanding of latent heat, the “hidden heat” present in all changes from one phase to another, by using a hand warmer; Grades 7-12.

Field Trip to a Power Plant: A Reading Guide – Uses Global Systems Science GSS) text from Lawrence Hall of Science, available online, to study differences in fuels that power electrical plants.

Lesson Plan Links

WebWatchers Web Guides – Use this link to access a wonderful amount of lesson plans on a variety of energy topics such as biomass, fossil fuels, solar, etc.
learningcenter.nsta.org/
Power for a Sustainable Future – A list of activities and fact sheets for teachers from Australia.
www.sustainableenergy.qld.edu.au/html/activitysheets.html
and lesson plans www.sustainableenergy.qld.edu.au/html/level5.html
Energy – Fuel for Thought – 3 lesson plans on energy from the Bureau of Land Management.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/energy/index.html
Renewable and Nonrenewable Energy – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, March 1998, p. 40. In these two activities, students distinguish between energy sources that are renewable and those that are nonrenewable, and discuss costs and benefits of each type.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/Columbia_river_basin/classroom.html
How to Build a Pizza Box Solar Oven – This small solar oven is ideal for heating s’mores, warming store-bought cookies or biscuits.
www.nrel.gov/education/solar_oven.html
Finding Resources – Students will: recognize that as time goes by, energy resources usually become harder to locate and recover; conclude that the price of a particular resource directly relates to the incentive of companies to obtain it; will realize that often the obtaining of energy resources has adverse environmental consequences; will learn that technological breakthroughs commonly affect both the known energy reserves and the ability of society to utilize them; will realize that the remaining reserves of fossil fuels are hard to predict and are not known with absolute certainty.
www4.nau.edu/eeop/aqcp/assets/docs/finding_energy_resources.doc

Secondary

Energy

Additional Resources

RENEWABLE ENERGY

Energy Quest – is the award-winning energy education website of the California Energy Commission. It has tremendous information on all facets of energy use.
ww.energyquest.ca.gov/about.html
The Australian Greenhouse Office – Information fact sheets for teachers about the greenhouse effect.
www.greenhouse.gov.au/education/factsheets/index.html
Renewable energy sources – a great list of resources.
www.teachers.ash.org.au/jmresources/energy/renewable.html
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy – of the U.S. Dept. of Energy. Portal to many interesting renewable energy topics.
www.eere.energy.gov/
Photovoltaic Cell Animation – Info and animation of photovoltaic solar cells from EERE.
www.eere.energy.gov/solar/photovoltaics.html
National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) – Information on education programs, research and technology, etc.
www.nrel.gov/

URANIUM

Uranium Information Centre
www.uic.com.au/index.htm
World Nuclear Association
www.world-nuclear.org/
Wyoming Uranium
www.wma-minelife.com/uranium/uranium.html
Yucca Mountain Project (YMP)
www.ymp.gov/

ENERGY (in general)

A Student’s Guide to Alternative Fuel Vehicles – California Energy Commission. A guide to alternative fuel cars powered with alcohols – ethanol and methanol, compressed natural gas to biodiesel.
www.energyquest.ca.gov/transportation/
International Energy Outlook 2003 – from the Department of Energy: presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues.
www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/preface.html
Energy Information Administration – Department of Energy
www.eia.doe.gov/
International Energy Agency and Statistical Information
www.eia.doe.gov/links.html
Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC)
www.fce.com/
Oil On My Shoes – This site will help you understand the science of Petroleum Geology.
www.geomore.com

FOSSIL FUELS

Office of Fossil Energy – Department of Energy
www.fe.doe.gov/
Minerals Management Service (MMS) – Department of the Interior
www.mms.gov/
National Petroleum Council
www.npc.org/
Oil & Gas International
www.oilandgasinternational.com/
FuelCell Energy Inc. – A company developing efficient fuel cells – An objective of DOE’s Vision 21 Program is to develop larger, multi-megawatt power plants that would generate electricity with net efficiencies approaching 75 percent (with natural gas), while producing sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions of less than 0.01 lb/million BTU. These goals are significant improvements over conventional power plants, which are only 35-60 percent efficient and produce emissions of 0.07 to 0.3 lb/million BTU of sulfur and nitrogen oxides (see Recent News Article 10/31/02).
www.fce.com/

ELECTRICITY

Energy Flow in the United States for year 1993
www.eia.doe.gov/gifs/elecflow.gif
Electric Power Research Institute
www.epri.com/
Electricity Energy Information Administration
www.eia.doe.gov/fuelelectric.html

Elementary

Environmental Issues

Lesson Plan Links

Environmental Research and Education Foundation’s Educational Activities for Secondary Schools – Activity 1 deals with Landfills. Activity 2 concerns packaging and transporting municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. Classes who complete the activities will receive a Certificate of Completion from EREF. For grades K-5, EREF offers its Solid Choices curricula, also available on the website. All EREF materials can be downloaded as pdf files.
www.erefdn.org/
Freddy the Fish – A nice activity for lower grades that helps students identify ways man pollutes our water supply; determine the harmful effects of our careless habits; and state the effects water pollution has on plant and animal life.
www2.tltc.ttu.edu/Thomas/conference%20paper/tes1998/Freddy%20the%20Fish.htm
RECYCLING –
In Materials 1: Materials and Manufacturing
This lesson is the first of a two-part series on the properties and uses of different materials.
The familiar tale of The Three Little Pigs is used as an introduction to materials and manufacturing. Students examine the properties, limitations, and durability of a variety of materials, then evaluate which of the materials would be best for building a model house. If used in its entirety, this lesson could take several science class times. [www.sciencenetlinks.com/lessons.cfm]
In Materials 2: Recycled Materials
Students are introduced to the idea that some materials can be recycled. They will investigate the types of materials that can be reused, as well as potential uses for each type of recyclable material. [www.sciencenetlinks.com/lessons.cfm]
Air Quality Lesson Plans and Data – all grades. What causes air quality problems? How bad is the air quality? Here is a lead page for a series of lesson plans about air quality. A number of the plans link to data from different parts of Texas.
www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/air/monops/lessons/lesson_plans.html
Fresh Water Streams – What are healthy streams like? What can make a stream unhealthy. This tells how the food web is important to a healthy stream. It also tells how acid rain and other pollution can hurt streams. Puzzles and games.
www.epa.gov/ost/KidsStuff/winter97/winter.pdf
Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study – Why have a research forest? Find out that answer and read about the long-term forest and associated aquatic ecosystems studies that are being done here.
www.hubbardbrook.org/
Earth Systems in a Bottle – Article describing this activity and the activity itself.
www.nsta.org/main/news/pdf/tst0009_48.pdf
As the World Turns – Ecosystems are communities of plants and animals in their immediate surroundings. An ecosystem can be in a desert, a tropical jungle, an ocean or a pond. Create your own ecosystem in a bottle and observe the growth of plants.
www.kineticcity.com//old/lab/HCHO/hcho6.html
Virtual Pond Dip – Discover some of the animals that are present in the pond at Canterbury Environmental Education Centre by clicking on the creatures in the spoon.
www.naturegrid.org.uk/pondexplorer/pondexplorer.html
To Plant or Not to Plant – Learn about deserts, other biomes, and the plant life they support as you travel with Bill Botanist. Use the interactive game to help him determine which biome will be best for his plant specimens.
earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Laboratory/Biome/
Where are the Penguins? – a webquest for first graders about penguins. Not really earth science, but great for getting first graders on the computer.
http://www.sd401.k12.il.us/CURRIC/webquests/PenguinWQ/FINAL_WQ_files/frame.htm
SciZone at the Ontario Science Centre – The Ontario Science Centre’s mission is ‘to delight, inform and challenge visitors through engaging and thought-provoking experiences in science and technology. There is a good activity called “Why is the Sky Blue?” – click on Home Lab; Discover Our Rainforest is cute too.
www.ontariosciencecentre.ca/scizone/
Bucket Buddies – is an online classroom project where students (grades 1-5) around the world participate in an environmental study. The project takes place during the fall and spring of the school year. Students will collect samples from local ponds to answer the question: Are the organisms found in pond water the same all over the world? Participants will identify macroinvertebrates in water samples; compare their findings with other participating classes; determine which, if any of the organisms are the same in other, more distant water sources; and look for relationships and trends in the data collected by all project participants.
www.k12science.org/curriculum/bucketproj/index.html
Singing for Wilderness – Many songs have been written recently which have an environmental theme. Music can get across environmental messages, can inform and influence attitudes about issues.
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/envirk-5.htm
Create A Food Chain (K-2) – Educators know that young children better visualize a concept after experiencing it with all their senses. When trying to teach them about the simple food chain, just eating a variety of foods and discussing their origin is not enough. Milk carton blocks are easy to assemble and your child can manipulate them to experiment with the pyramid that is created in an actual food chain.
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/foodchk2.htm
Create A Food Chain (3-5) – Remember how much children enjoy making paper chains? Let’s use paper to make a food chain in order to learn how all Earth’s creatures and plants are linked to each other and to the sun.
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/foodch35.htm
Spinning the EcoWeb (3-12) – Through a physical activity, students discover the components and relationships of ecoregions and the role of ecosystem management in these ecoregions. The student will: 1. Describe some non-living and living components of an ecoregion (a geographic area where the combination of climate and soils produce a distinct plant community). 2. Demonstrate a component of an ecoregion. 3. Describe how each living component in an ecoregion is related to the sun and to other ecoregion components.
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/envir3-1.htm

See Environmental Issues >> Intermediate >> Additional Resources
for Web sites with information on ecosystems.

Elementary

Environmental Science

Additional Resources

Internet Sites Books
Environmental Literacy Council – features labs, projects, and activities for studying the air and climate, land, water, ecosystems, energy, food, and environment and society. Learn about the carbon cycle, forests, fossil fuels, nuclear energy, renewable energy, photosynthesis, soils, thermodynamics, waste management, water quality, weather, and more. Find out about legislation and treaties, resources in your state, and science in the news. (MA)
http://www.enviroliteracy.org/index.php
Guide for Teaching About Coastal Wetlands – helps students identify types of wetlands and understand the role of wetlands in controlling erosion, retaining water, filtering pollutants, and serving as nurseries for young organisms. The barrier islands, the Mississippi River, and the consequences of wetland loss are examined. Includes activities for all grade levels (USGS)
http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/fringe/ff_index.html
NRCS Soils – includes soil surveys for each state, a manual for surveying soil, an urban soil primer for homeowners and local planning boards, and “tools for educators” — lessons and information on soil taxonomy (the “12 orders of soil”), fundamental conceptsabout soil, soil biology, and soil risks and hazards. (USDA)
http://soils.usda.gov/
Soil Science Home Page – looks at soil fertility, nitrogen in soil, soil chemistry,soils as electrical systems, soils as filters, soil physics and particle sizes (silt, sand, and clay), microorganisms in soil,nutrients that plants need, soil morphology, judging soil byfeel, structures and shapes of soil, and “soil profile” imagesfrom Arizona, Florida, Michigan, and other states. Learn howsoil is formed and how long it takes to create an inch of soil. (NASA)
http://soil.gsfc.nasa.gov/
National Environmental Education & Training Foundation (NEETF) – A website for K-12 environmental education emphasizes many of the most popular and highly-regarded environmental education programs available today. It provides educators with profiles, reviews, and useful information on how to obtain materials, training and more.
www.classroomearth.org/
Environmental Question Bank – from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission; these questions and answers are based on air quality and pollution; water conservation, quality, and testing; and waste and compost issues. Each section also includes Jeopardy-style questions, all of which can be used in the games of the Texas Environmental Science lesson plans. High school, Intermediate elementary, Middle school, Primary elementary.
www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/exec/sbea/tes/lessons99/qbank.html
Classroom Resources-Directories – Directories and databases of EE curricula and resources are available. The mission of EE-Link is to disseminate information and ideas that will help educators explore the environment and investigate current issues with students.
eelink.net/classroomresources-directories.html
Environmental Education Center – This site offers information of interest to teachers including: curriculum resources, workshops and conferences, community service projects, career opportunities, and grants. It includes a collection of fact sheets, brochures, and web pages that you can use to teach about and explore environmental issues.
www.epa.gov/teachers/
The Center for Great Lakes Environmental Education – is an informational resource designed to provide access to Great Lakes educational material, as well as to identify, and address teacher training needs. This web site is a first step to provide educators, both formal and non-formal, with centralized access to educational information on the Great Lakes.
www.greatlakesed.org/index.html
GIS and Environmental Science for Teachers K-14 – This website aims to provide students with a sense of place, to see themselves as part of the global community and as having a responsibility for taking care of the planet. It provides a series of presentations, tutorials, and activities to be used in the classroom and help teach students about the importance of our environment and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
www.woodrow.org/teachers/esi/1997/02/GISandES.htm

Internet Sites Books
Understanding Your Environment – This five-part unit for grades 9-12 in the EarthComm: Earth System Science in the Community series teaches the tenets and practices of earth science and explains how river systems, bedrock geology, and land use affect life on Earth. Student activities sections are included in each chapter. The teachers edition contains an overview, chapter timelines, student goals, and a guide that tells how each chapter relates to the National Science Education Standards. Purchase for $19.95 per student version and $39.95 per teacher version from It’s About Time, Inc., Suite 307, 84 Business Park Dr., Armonk, NY 10504; 1-888-698-8463; fax 914-273-2227.
www.its-about-time.com
Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units – Science curriculum materials that address island environmental issues are now available free online The Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units present important scientific concepts in Pacific Island learning contexts and engage island values, such as careful stewardship of the home environment. Appropriate for Pacific Island learners everywhere, the units can satisfy teachers’ needs for multicultural curriculum materials that engage diverse learners. Directed at middle school and lower-level high school students, the units include “The Island’s Freshwater and Ecology,” “Our Coral Reef,” and “Fish as a Marine Resource.” “Organisms Around Our Island” focuses on knowledge and understanding of ecosystems; “A Field Trip to Nan Madol” invites students to explore as paleontologists an important archeological site; and “Components of Pacific Sand” gives them an opportunity to classify living organisms and investigate natural rock formation processes. Conservation of natural and cultural resources is a focus throughout.
Visit www.prel.org/products/ms_/pathfinder/pathfinder.htm. The Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units are available as a printed publication or as HTML and PDF files.
For more information, e-mail askmathsci@prel.org

Intermediate

Environmental Science

Lesson Plans

Field Trip to a Power Plant: A Reading Guide – Uses Global Systems Science GSS) text from Lawrence Hall of Science, available online, to study differences in fuels that power electrical plants.

Building and Monitoring a Living Machine: Students – construct a Living Machine and maintain the living machine for one semester. Explore the principles and components necessary for a healthy living machine. Learn how to monitor abiotic and biotic parameters by monitoring the living machine in class. Keep a journal for recording all observations and relate observations to lessons being learned in class.

Lesson Plan Links

EPA’S Enviro-Mapper – Enter a zip code and your selection area appears with information on toxic releases, water discharge, air emissions, superfund sites and more. Links exist for watershed health, reports on chemical-based releases within an area of choice, brown field development, and environmental monitoring in the New York City area in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. (Audience: high school and up)
www.epa.gov/enviro/html/
Environmental Research and Education Foundation’s Educational Activities for Secondary Schools – Activity 1 deals with Landfills. Activity 2 concerns packaging and transporting municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. Classes who complete the activities will receive a Certificate of Completion from EREF. For grades K-5, EREF offers its Solid Choices curricula, also available on the website. All EREF materials can be downloaded as pdf files.
www.erefdn.org
Endangered Species 2 – Working to Save Endangered Species” (6-8) Science NetLinks, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Students explore the Endangered Species Act and the work of scientists who strive to identify, investigate and protect species.
http://www.marcopolo-education.org/mg/lesson582.aspx
EPA GLOBAL WARMING BY STATE – from EPA, the site offers a state by state discussion on the impacts of climate warming. For each state you will find how climate change will affect human health, agriculture, water resources, forests, and ecosystems. (Audience: middle school and up)
yosemite.epa.gov/oar/globalwarming.nsf/content/ImpactsStateImpacts.html
EnviroScience – The following site has good background information on water quality and testing instruments as well ass lesson plans. Has some good cost-benefit analysis activities, like “The Shell Island Dilemma.”
www.leo.lehigh.edu/envirosci/guide/
Coral Reef Connections – This resource explores Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, the largest structure on Earth built by living organisms. It demonstrates the types of relationships among living things that have contributed to this incredible biodiversity and elaborates on some of the adaptations that have enabled species to survive and reproduce in this unique habitat.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/survival/coral/
The Question in Smithdale – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, November/December 1994 posterback. Students simulate a “public meeting” to resolve concerns about a proposed land exchange involving public lands and the town of Smithdale. Includes background and position cards.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/
understanding_ecosystem_management/posterback.html
Environmental Rhyme and Reason (Grades to 6-8, 9-12) Analyzing ‘The State of the Planet’ – Students employ poetry as a medium to relay information and express views about significant environmental issues that exist today and to assess their effects on ‘The State of the Planet’ as we enter the next millennium.
www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/19991123tuesday.html
Air Quality Lesson Plans and Data – All grades. What causes air quality problems? How bad is the air quality? Here is a lead page for a series of lesson plans about air quality. A number of the plans link to data from different parts of Texas.
www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/air/monops/lessons/lesson_plans.html
Global Warming Statistics – This page presents a lesson plan for an inquiry lesson to be carried out by students on global warming. It uses climatic data for locations worldwide for which weblinks are provided. Students are expected to collect and analyze and present data.
www.thirteen.org/edonline/lessons/global/index.html
EPA Environmental Classroom Activities – Superfund for Students and Teachers – This section includes resources to help teachers and educate students (grades 2-12) about the Superfund Program. It includes several activities, environmental cleanup videos, and a participatory program in which classrooms collect weather data for EPA. Activities like: “Waste: Where Does It Come From? Where Does It Go?”, “How Hazardous Substances Effect People” and “Examine the Effects of Pollution on Ecosystems”.
www.epa.gov/superfund/students/clas_act/index.htm
What Makes up an Ecosystem? – What is necessary for a healthy ecosystem? Here is an 8th grade lesson plan that asks students to make an ecosystem and discuss the organisms that feed upon each other. They will think about how energy moves in the ecosystem.
entowww.tamu.edu/academic/ucourses/ento489/ and click on lesson plans.
Let’s Create An Ecosystem – What is an ecosystem? Here is a 7th grade plan (although it is listed under 9-12) to have students create an ecosystem in the classroom using an aquarium. They can maintain the ecosystem and make changes in it during the year. They can also learn about energy flow in the ecosystem.
entowww.tamu.edu/academic/ucourses/ento489/ and click on lesson plans.
Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study – Why have a research forest? Find out that answer and read about the long-term forest and associated aquatic ecosystems studies that are being done here.
www.hubbardbrook.org/
Earth Systems in a Bottle – Article describing this activity and the activity itself.
www.nsta.org/main/news/pdf/tst0009_48.pdf
As the World Turns – Ecosystems are communities of plants and animals in their immediate surroundings. An ecosystem can be in a desert, a tropical jungle, an ocean or a pond. Create your own ecosystem in a bottle and observe the growth of plants.
www.kineticcity.com//old/lab/HCHO/hcho6.html
To Plant or Not to Plant – Learn about deserts, other biomes, and the plant life they support as you travel with Bill Botanist. Use the interactive game to help him determine which biome will be best for his plant specimens.
earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Laboratory/Biome/
Common Ground (6-8, 9-12) – Through visiting places where habitats overlap, students explore the concept of ecotones. The student will identify the characteristics of ecotones or overlapping ecosystems in wildlife habitat in or near their communities and describe why plants and animals are generally more diverse in ecotones than in separate ecosystems.
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/envi6-12.htm
Spinning the EcoWeb (3-12) – Through a physical activity, students discover the components and relationships of ecoregions and the role of ecosystem management in these ecoregions. The student will: 1. Describe some non-living and living components of an ecoregion (a geographic area where the combination of climate and soils produce a distinct plant community). 2. Demonstrate a component of an ecoregion. 3. Describe how each living component in an ecoregion is related to the sun and to other ecoregion components.
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/envir3-1.htm
How to Build a Pizza Box Solar Oven – This small solar oven is ideal for heating s’mores, warming store-bought cookies or biscuits.
www.nrel.gov/education/solar_oven.html

See Environmental Issues >> Intermediate >> Additional Resources
for Web sites with information on ecosystems.

Intermediate

Environmental Science

Additional Resources

Internet Sites Books
Environmental Literacy Council – features labs, projects, and activities for studying the air and climate, land, water, ecosystems, energy, food, and environment and society. Learn about the carbon cycle, forests, fossil fuels, nuclear energy, renewable energy, photosynthesis, soils, thermodynamics, waste management, water quality, weather, and more. Find out about legislation and treaties, resources in your state, and science in the news. (MA)
http://www.enviroliteracy.org/index.php
Guide for Teaching About Coastal Wetlands – helps students identify types of wetlands and understand the role of wetlands in controlling erosion, retaining water, filtering pollutants, and serving as nurseries for young organisms. The barrier islands, the Mississippi River, and the consequences of wetland loss are examined. Includes activities for all grade levels (USGS)
http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/fringe/ff_index.html
NRCS Soils – includes soil surveys for each state, a manual for surveying soil, an urban soil primer for homeowners and local planning boards, and “tools for educators” — lessons and information on soil taxonomy (the “12 orders of soil”), fundamental conceptsabout soil, soil biology, and soil risks and hazards. (USDA)
http://soils.usda.gov/
Soil Science Home Page – looks at soil fertility, nitrogen in soil, soil chemistry,soils as electrical systems, soils as filters, soil physics and particle sizes (silt, sand, and clay), microorganisms in soil,nutrients that plants need, soil morphology, judging soil byfeel, structures and shapes of soil, and “soil profile” imagesfrom Arizona, Florida, Michigan, and other states. Learn howsoil is formed and how long it takes to create an inch of soil. (NASA)
http://soil.gsfc.nasa.gov/
National Environmental Education & Training Foundation (NEETF) – A website for K-12 environmental education emphasizes many of the most popular and highly-regarded environmental education programs available today. It provides educators with profiles, reviews, and useful information on how to obtain materials, training and more.
www.classroomearth.org/
Environmental Inquiry – EI is a website and curriculum series developed at Cornell to help students conduct environmental science research and participate in communities of fellow student scientists. Our goals are for students to: 1) Develop research skills, 2) Use these skills to design and conduct research projects focusing on relevant local environmental science topics, 3) Participate in communities of fellow student scientists, and 4) Enhance their understanding of scientific content and process.
ei.cornell.edu/
What’s Up with the Weather – This is an introductory page to the topic of Climate Change. It links directly to a variety of activities on energy use creating climatic change. These activities run the gamut from an interactive game to statistical data to an online discussion. Great resources for scientific debate about global warming (click on “The Debate”).
www.pbs.org/wgbh/warming/
Environmental Defense – Wealth of information on hot topic environmental issues like air quality, stabilizing the climate, environmental justice, global warming, etc.
www.environmentaldefense.org/system/templates/page/focus.cfm?focus=3
Environmental Question Bank – from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission; these questions and answers are based on air quality and pollution; water conservation, quality, and testing; and waste and compost issues. Each section also includes Jeopardy-style questions, all of which can be used in the games of the Texas Environmental Science lesson plans. High school, Intermediate elementary, Middle school, Primary elementary.
www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/exec/sbea/tes/lessons99/qbank.html
Classroom Resources-Directories – Directories and databases of EE curricula and resources are available. The mission of EE-Link is to disseminate information and ideas that will help educators explore the environment and investigate current issues with students.
eelink.net/classroomresources-directories.html
Environmental Education Center – This site offers information of interest to teachers including: curriculum resources, workshops and conferences, community service projects, career opportunities, and grants. It includes a collection of fact sheets, brochures, and web pages that you can use to teach about and explore environmental issues.
www.epa.gov/teachers/index.html
The Center for Great Lakes Environmental Education – is an informational resource designed to provide access to Great Lakes educational material, as well as to identify, and address teacher training needs. This web site is a first step to provide educators, both formal and non-formal, with centralized access to educational information on the Great Lakes.
www.greatlakesed.org/index.html
GIS and Environmental Science for Teachers K-14 – This website aims to provide students with a sense of place, to see themselves as part of the global community and as having a responsibility for taking care of the planet. It provides a series of presentations, tutorials, and activities to be used in the classroom and help teach students about the importance of our environment and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
www.woodrow.org/teachers/esi/1997/02/GISandES.htm

Informational sites on Ecosystems (for teachers AND students)

The Ecosystem – What is an ecosystem? What are the major parts of an ecosystem? Learn about a pond’s ecosystem and discover what a food pyramid would look like from such an ecosystem.
www.netusa1.net/~gwmager/Ecosystem.html
Biomes of the World – Where in the world are those biomes? Click on a biome and discover where it is located throughout the world.
www.snowcrest.net/freemanl/world/biomes/
World Biomes – A compilation of information on all the different types of biomes from the oceans to estuaries to grasslands. Photos are included.
www.worldbiomes.com
Biomes of the World – from the Missouri Botanical Garden.
mbgnet.mobot.org
Biomes – Learn how humans have affected ecosystems and explore the many biomes of the world.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss5/biome/index.html
Tour of Biomes – Biomes are distinct ecological communities of plants and animals living together in a particular climate. Click here to learn about desert ecosystems and the unique organisms they support plus information on five other biomes of the world.
www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/msese/earthsysflr/biomes.html
Australia’s Ecosystems – This site is an extract of a script from an Australian video series about the Australian ecosystems. Learn about arid, mangroves & wetlands, reef, rainforest, island, river and riparian fringe, and remnant ecosystems.
www.gullivermedia.com.au/eco.html
Coral Reefs: destruction and preservation – Coral reefs, their destruction, and organizations targeted to reconstruction and preservation is the focus of this article. Destruction of coral reefs has been a major ecological issue, only recently has major attention been given to protecting them.
www.micro.utexas.edu/courses/mcmurry/fall97/12/coralreef.html
The Mojave and Other Desert Ecosystems – Explore the animals, insects, and plants of the Mojave Desert at this National Park Service site and find information on other North American and world deserts. Maps, pictorial field trips and an on-line story are just a few of the things you will find.
www.nps.gov/moja/home.htm
Desert Life – What is a desert? How many deserts are in North America? Learn about the desert environment and the unique characteristics that define the beautiful arid and semi-arid landscapes of the American Southwest.
www.desertusa.com/life.html
What is a Wetland? – Wetlands are land areas covered by water some or all of the time. These unique habitats have certain characteristics in common. Click here to learn about these characteristics and take a tour of four different types of wetland environments.
vathena.arc.nasa.gov/curric/land/wetland/wetdef.html
What Are Wetlands? – This page has a definition and lists five categories of wetlands.
www.ramsar.org/about_wetlands.htm
Wetlands and People – Only recently have we begun to understand the importance of the functions that wetlands perform. Far from being useless, disease-ridden places, wetlands provide values that no other ecosystem can.
www.epa.gov/OWOW/wetlands/vital/people.html
Plankton – Plankton includes plants and animals that float along at the mercy of the sea’s tides and currents. Material explains the various types of plankton and their importance in the ecosystem.
www.umassd.edu/public/people/kamaral/thesis/plankton.html
Tropical Rainforest Animals – Learn about the animals of the rainforest and why the rainforest is home to more species that any other ecosystem.
www.ran.org/kids_action/s06_animals.html
Insects of the Rainforest – Discover the insects that live in the rainforest. Click on the ECOsystem button.
passporttoknowledge.com/rainforest/main.html
Home on the Ridge: Life on the Hydrothermal Vents – Over 60% of the earth is covered by ocean that is more than a mile deep. Hydrothermal water is full of energy-rich chemicals like hydrogen sulfide spewing from chimneys that support tubeworms and other interesting creatures. Highly informative site.
www.bio.psu.edu/hotvents/
Hydrothermal Vent Communities – Information on the unusual communities that surround hydrothermal vents. contains a ten question quiz, self-scoring, with reference links to material for each question.
www.botos.com/marine/vents01.html
Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vents – An interactive activity that allows the user to learn about the deep ocean floor and its strange inhabitants while making choices to investigate different areas or creatures.
www.ocean.washington.edu/people/grads/scottv/exploraquarium/vent/intro.htm
Reef Database – From this Reef Survey project database you can generate a variety of reports on marine fish species distribution and abundance patterns. Click on a map to choose the coral reef region. Invertebrate survey data are also available.
www.reef.org/data/data.htm

Internet Sites Books
Understanding Your Environment – This five-part unit for grades 9-12 in the EarthComm: Earth System Science in the Community series teaches the tenets and practices of earth science and explains how river systems, bedrock geology, and land use affect life on Earth. Student activities sections are included in each chapter. The teachers edition contains an overview, chapter timelines, student goals, and a guide that tells how each chapter relates to the National Science Education Standards. Purchase for $19.95 per student version and $39.95 per teacher version from It’s About Time, Inc., Suite 307, 84 Business Park Dr., Armonk, NY 10504; 1-888-698-8463; fax 914-273-2227.
www.its-about-time.com
Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units – Science curriculum materials that address island environmental issues are now available free online The Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units present important scientific concepts in Pacific Island learning contexts and engage island values, such as careful stewardship of the home environment. Appropriate for Pacific Island learners everywhere, the units can satisfy teachers’ needs for multicultural curriculum materials that engage diverse learners. Directed at middle school and lower-level high school students, the units include “The Island’s Freshwater and Ecology,” “Our Coral Reef,” and “Fish as a Marine Resource.” “Organisms Around Our Island” focuses on knowledge and understanding of ecosystems; “A Field Trip to Nan Madol” invites students to explore as paleontologists an important archeological site; and “Components of Pacific Sand” gives them an opportunity to classify living organisms and investigate natural rock formation processes. Conservation of natural and cultural resources is a focus throughout.
Visit www.prel.org/products/ms_/pathfinder/pathfinder.htm. The Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units are available as a printed publication or as HTML and PDF files.
For more information, e-mail askmathsci@prel.org

Secondary

Environmental Science

Lesson Plans

Groundwater Contamination Lesson Plan – Uses a concept diagram to aid with comprehension of two articles concerning contamination of underground drinking water supplies.

Building and Monitoring a Living Machine: Students – construct a Living Machine and maintain the living machine for one semester. Explore the principles and components necessary for a healthy living machine. Learn how to monitor abiotic and biotic parameters by monitoring the living machine in class. Keep a journal for recording all observations and relate observations to lessons being learned in class.

Lesson Plan Links

EPA’S Enviro-Mapper – Enter a zip code and your selection area appears with information on toxic releases, water discharge, air emissions, superfund sites and more. Links exist for watershed health, reports on chemical-based releases within an area of choice, brown field development, and environmental monitoring in the New York City area in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. (Audience: high school and up)
www.epa.gov/enviro/html/
Environmental Research and Education Foundation’s Educational Activities for Secondary Schools – Activity 1 deals with Landfills. Activity 2 concerns packaging and transporting municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. Classes who complete the activities will receive a Certificate of Completion from EREF. For grades K-5, EREF offers its Solid Choices curricula, also available on the website. All EREF materials can be downloaded as pdf files.
www.erefdn.org/
EPA GLOBAL WARMING BY STATE – from EPA, the site offers a state by state discussion on the impacts of climate warming. For each state you will find how climate change will affect human health, agriculture, water resources, forests, and ecosystems. (Audience: middle school and up)
yosemite.epa.gov/oar/globalwarming.nsf/content/ImpactsStateImpacts.html
EnviroScience – The following site has good background information on water quality and testing instruments as well as lesson plans. Has some good cost-benefit analysis activities, like “The Shell Island Dilemma.”
www.leo.lehigh.edu/envirosci/guide/index.html
Coral Reef Connections – This resource explores Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, the largest structure on Earth built by living organisms. It demonstrates the types of relationships among living things that have contributed to this incredible biodiversity and elaborates on some of the adaptations that have enabled species to survive and reproduce in this unique habitat.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/survival/coral/index.html
Environmental Rhyme and Reason (Grades to 6-8, 9-12) Analyzing ‘The State of the Planet’ – Students employ poetry as a medium to relay information and express views about significant environmental issues that exist today and to assess their effects on ‘The State of the Planet’ as we enter the next millennium.
www.lessonplans4teachers.com/
Air Quality Lesson Plans and Data – All grades. What causes air quality problems? How bad is the air quality? Here is a lead page for a series of lesson plans about air quality. A number of the plans link to data from different parts of Texas.
www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/air/monops/lessons/lesson_plans.html
Global Warming Statistics – This page presents a lesson plan for an inquiry lesson to be carried out by students on global warming. It uses climatic data for locations worldwide for which weblinks are provided. Students are expected to collect and analyze and present data.
www.thirteen.org/edonline/lessons/global/index.html
EPA Environmental Classroom Activities – Superfund for Students and Teachers – This section includes resources to help teachers and educate students (grades 2-12) about the Superfund Program. It includes several activities, environmental cleanup videos, and a participatory program in which classrooms collect weather data for EPA. Activities like: “Waste: Where Does It Come From? Where Does It Go?”, “How Hazardous Substances Effect People”, and “Examine the Effects of Pollution on Ecosystems”.
www.epa.gov/superfund/students/clas_act/index.htm
Earth Systems in a Bottle – Article describing this activity and the activity itself.
www.nsta.org/main/news/pdf/tst0009_48.pdf
As the World Turns – Ecosystems are communities of plants and animals in their immediate surroundings. An ecosystem can be in a desert, a tropical jungle, an ocean or a pond. Create your own ecosystem in a bottle and observe the growth of plants.
www.kineticcity.com//old/lab/HCHO/hcho6.html
Common Ground (6-8, 9-12) – Through visiting places where habitats overlap, students explore the concept of ecotones. The student will identify the characteristics of ecotones or overlapping ecosystems in wildlife habitat in or near their communities and describe why plants and animals are generally more diverse in ecotones than in separate ecosystems.
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/envi6-12.htm
Spinning the EcoWeb (3-12) – Through a physical activity, students discover the components and relationships of ecoregions and the role of ecosystem management in these ecoregions. The student will: 1. Describe some non-living and living components of an ecoregion (a geographic area where the combination of climate and soils produce a distinct plant community). 2. Demonstrate a component of an ecoregion. 3. Describe how each living component in an ecoregion is related to the sun and to other ecoregion components.
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/envir3-1.htm
How to Build a Pizza Box Solar Oven – This small solar oven is ideal for heating s’mores, warming store-bought cookies or biscuits.
www.nrel.gov/education/solar_oven.html

See Environmental Issues>>Intermediate>>Additional Resources
for Web sites with information on ecosystems.

Secondary

Environmental Science

Additional Resources

Internet Sites Videos Books
Environmental Literacy Council – features labs, projects, and activities for studying the air and climate, land, water, ecosystems, energy, food, and environment and society. Learn about the carbon cycle, forests, fossil fuels, nuclear energy, renewable energy, photosynthesis, soils, thermodynamics, waste management, water quality, weather, and more. Find out about legislation and treaties, resources in your state, and science in the news. (MA)
http://www.enviroliteracy.org/index.php
Guide for Teaching About Coastal Wetlands – helps students identify types of wetlands and understand the role of wetlands in controlling erosion, retaining water, filtering pollutants, and serving as nurseries for young organisms. The barrier islands, the Mississippi River, and the consequences of wetland loss are examined. Includes activities for all grade levels (USGS)
http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/fringe/ff_index.html
NRCS Soils – includes soil surveys for each state, a manual for surveying soil, an urban soil primer for homeowners and local planning boards, and “tools for educators” — lessons and information on soil taxonomy (the “12 orders of soil”), fundamental conceptsabout soil, soil biology, and soil risks and hazards. (USDA)
http://soils.usda.gov/
Soil Science Home Page – looks at soil fertility, nitrogen in soil, soil chemistry,soils as electrical systems, soils as filters, soil physics and particle sizes (silt, sand, and clay), microorganisms in soil,nutrients that plants need, soil morphology, judging soil byfeel, structures and shapes of soil, and “soil profile” imagesfrom Arizona, Florida, Michigan, and other states. Learn howsoil is formed and how long it takes to create an inch of soil. (NASA)
http://soil.gsfc.nasa.gov/
National Environmental Education & Training Foundation (NEETF) – A website for K-12 environmental education emphasizes many of the most popular and highly-regarded environmental education programs available today. It provides educators with profiles, reviews, and useful information on how to obtain materials, training and more.
www.classroomearth.org/
What’s Up with the Weather – This is an introductory page to the topic of Climate Change. It links directly to a variety of activities on energy use creating climatic change. These activities run the gamut from an interactive game to statistical data to an online discussion. Great resources for scientific debate about global warming (click on “The Debate”).
www.pbs.org/wgbh/warming/
Environmental Defense – Wealth of information on hot topic environmental issues like air quality, stabilizing the climate, environmental justice, global warming, etc.
www.environmentaldefense.org/system/templates/page/focus.cfm?focus=3
Biomes of the World – Where in the world are those biomes? Click on a biome and discover where it is located throughout the world.
www.snowcrest.net/freemanl/world/biomes/

More Biomes – See Environmental Issues>>Intermediate>>Additional Resources for Web sites with information on ecosystems.

Environmental Inquiry – EI is a website and curriculum series developed at Cornell to help students conduct environmental science research and participate in communities of fellow student scientists. Our goals are for students to: 1) Develop research skills, 2) Use these skills to design and conduct research projects focusing on relevant local environmental science topics, 3) Participate in communities of fellow student scientists, and 4) Enhance their understanding of scientific content and process.
ei.cornell.edu/
Exploratorium of Global Climate Change –
http://www.exploratorium.edu/climate
GM K-12 Education Initiatives – has a collection of environmental Web sites
http://gm.com/company/gmability/environment/gm_and_the_env/env_edu/index.html
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration –
http://www.noaa.gov/
National Center for Atmospheric Research –
http://www.ncar.ucar.edu/ncar/
United Nations Environment Program – Understanding Climate Change: A Beginner’s Guide to the UN Framework Convention
http://www.unep.ch/iuc/submenu/begin/beginner.htm
Commission on Geosciences, Environment and Resources – National Research Council Web Site
http://www.nationalacademies.org/
Simulation of Global Warming –
http://www.mri-jma.go.jp/Proj/goin/tsdif/tsdif70.gif
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Global Warming –
http://yosemite.epa.gov/oar/globalwarming.nsf/content/index.html
Global Warming International Center – Global Warming and Climate Change; Great information and a “Global Warming for Kids” section.
http://www.globalwarming.net/
The World Climate Report –
http://www.greeningearthsociety.org/
Global Environment Information Center – GEIC has a commitment to better involve civil groups and people in environmental issues, and undertakes studies and activities that can better involve NGOs and other grassroots organizations in international and national environmental processes
http://202.253.138.71/Scripts/dbml.exe?TEMPLATE=/ENV/project.dbm&type=1
Climate Institute –
http://www.climate.org/
Common Questions about Climate Change –
http://www.ieagreen.org.uk/questns.htm
Center for International Climate and Environmental Research –
http://www.cicero.uio.no/index_e.asp
Global Warming and Climate Change – A brochure prepared by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University to explain the issue of global warming and climate change.
http://www.gcrio.org/gwcc/toc.html
World Climate Report – publication covering the breaking news concerning the science and political science of global climate change.
http://www.ace.mmu.ac.uk/Resources/gcc/
Environmental Question Bank – from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission; these questions and answers are based on air quality and pollution; water conservation, quality, and testing; and waste and compost issues. Each section also includes Jeopardy-style questions, all of which can be used in the games of the Texas Environmental Science lesson plans. High school, Intermediate elementary, Middle school, Primary elementary.
www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/exec/sbea/tes/lessons99/qbank.html
Classroom Resources-Directories – Directories and databases of EE curricula and resources are available. The mission of EE-Link is to disseminate information and ideas that will help educators explore the environment and investigate current issues with students.
eelink.net/classroomresources-directories.html
Environmental Education Center – This site offers information of interest to teachers including: curriculum resources, workshops and conferences, community service projects, career opportunities, and grants. It includes a collection of fact sheets, brochures, and web pages that you can use to teach about and explore environmental issues.
www.epa.gov/teachers/index.html
The Center for Great Lakes Environmental Education – is an informational resource designed to provide access to Great Lakes educational material, as well as to identify, and address teacher training needs. This web site is a first step to provide educators, both formal and non-formal, with centralized access to educational information on the Great Lakes.
www.greatlakesed.org/index.html
GIS and Environmental Science for Teachers K-14 – This website aims to provide students with a sense of place, to see themselves as part of the global community and as having a responsibility for taking care of the planet. It provides a series of presentations, tutorials, and activities to be used in the classroom and help teach students about the importance of our environment and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
www.woodrow.org/teachers/esi/1997/02/GISandES.htm
Internet Sites Videos Books
Poison in the Rockies – Amazing video about the threats to water quality in the Colorado Rockies (mining, acid precipitation and recreational development). Here is PBS’s updated “Nova” version of the award-winning DOWNWIND/DOWNSTREAM, documenting the serious threat to water quality, sub-alpine ecosystems and public health in the Colorado Rockies from mining operations, acid rain and urbanization. 56 minutes. Grade Level: Grades 9-12, College, Adult. US Release Date: 1990. ISBN: 1-56029-065-X. Contact educator@geosociety.org for a video worksheet.
www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/poison.html
Internet Sites Videos Books
Understanding Your Environment – This five-part unit for grades 9-12 in the EarthComm: Earth System Science in the Community series teaches the tenets and practices of earth science and explains how river systems, bedrock geology, and land use affect life on Earth. Student activities sections are included in each chapter. The teachers edition contains an overview, chapter timelines, student goals, and a guide that tells how each chapter relates to the National Science Education Standards. Purchase for $19.95 per student version and $39.95 per teacher version from It’s About Time, Inc., Suite 307, 84 Business Park Dr., Armonk, NY 10504; 1-888-698-8463; fax 914-273-2227.
www.its-about-time.com
Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units – Science curriculum materials that address island environmental issues are now available free online The Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units present important scientific concepts in Pacific Island learning contexts and engage island values, such as careful stewardship of the home environment. Appropriate for Pacific Island learners everywhere, the units can satisfy teachers’ needs for multicultural curriculum materials that engage diverse learners. Directed at middle school and lower-level high school students, the units include “The Island’s Freshwater and Ecology,” “Our Coral Reef,” and “Fish as a Marine Resource.” “Organisms Around Our Island” focuses on knowledge and understanding of ecosystems; “A Field Trip to Nan Madol” invites students to explore as paleontologists an important archeological site; and “Components of Pacific Sand” gives them an opportunity to classify living organisms and investigate natural rock formation processes. Conservation of natural and cultural resources is a focus throughout.
Visit www.prel.org/products/ms_/pathfinder/pathfinder.htm. The Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units are available as a printed publication or as HTML and PDF files.
For more information, e-mail askmathsci@prel.org

Intermediate

Geology & Geologic Time

Lesson Plans

Geologic Cross-Section (7-12) – Have your students create a construction paper cross section. The results are beautiful AND instructional.

Lesson Plan Links

Earth’s History – Selected Labs and Activities from Earth to Class.
http://earth2class.org/curr_units/history%20labs.php
Earth Floor Geologic Time Activity – Compare geologic time to the length of a football field, which is 100 yards long.
www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/msese/earthsysflr/geo_activity.html
Radiometric Dating Explained – Here are several very good Web site explaining radiometric dating, one specifically about carbon-14 dating:
www.asa3.org/ASA/resources/Wiens.html
www.c14dating.com/
Three Dimensional Geology – Apply geological concepts to a real-life problem-solving situation and give students an appreciation of the three dimensional nature of rock strata using rocks, fossils, and simulated cores geologyonline.museum.state.il.us/tools/lessons/12.5/lesson.pdf

Intermediate

Geology & Geologic Time

Additional Resources

CD-ROMs

Explore Volcanoes CD-ROM
Order Yours Today!
GSA Sales and Service
Explore Deep Time – Geologic Time and Beyond -– If you are teaching about deep time, geologic time and/or absolute time, you will want this CD-ROM! Enhance your teaching with background on the history of our understanding of deep time and explanations of relative age dating and radiometric dating. Full teacher notes, reproducible student activities and suggested answers in PDF format are complimented by colorful diagrams and models to use in your classroom.This resource has been developed by geoscience teachers for geoscience teachers and the matierials are curriculum linked to National Science Standards. On Sale! $9.95.

Interactive Internet Sites

Geologic Time: The Story of a Changing Earth – examines the history of Earth. Learn about the formation of Earth, dating the age of rocks, geologic time, plate tectonics, climate change, ocean circulation, evolution, extinction, ecology, and topics related to paleobiology. (SI)
http://www.nmnh.si.edu/paleo/geotime/
Timeline of the Universe – is an online tutorial that traces the 15-billion-year history of the universe. It starts with the Big Bang and discusses the formation of elements in stars, planetary systems, Earth-like planets, and Jupiter-like planets. The “chemistry of life” is also examined. (NASA)
http://origins.jpl.nasa.gov/library/poster/poster.html
Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center
A new 20,000 square foot dinosaur museum in Woodland Park, Colorado. Exhibits include huge marine reptiles, pterosaurs, remarkable dinosaurs, a visible working fossil lab, educational activities, interactive children’s area.
www.rmdrc.com
Understanding Geologic Time – introduces students to geologic time, the evidence for events in Earth’s history, relative and absolute dating techniques, and the significance of the geologic time scale. Need computer access, adaptable to elementary.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/geotime/index.html
Learning From the Fossil Record – A collection of informative papers and activities to assist teachers in using paleontology and related fields to teach major concepts in science. They also help to tell part of the story of the Earth.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fosrec/Learning.html

Secondary

Geology & Geologic Time

Lesson Plans

Relative Age Dating Activity – This exercise will introduce your students to the concept of relative age dating, and allow them to practice their new skills by determining the age sequence of geologic events in a cross section. They will learn the geologic principles that help geologists in their study of the Earth’s crust.

Geologic Cross-Section (7-12) – Have your students create a construction paper cross section. The results are beautiful AND instructional.

Lesson Plan Links

Earth’s History – Selected Labs and Activities from Earth to Class.
http://earth2class.org/curr_units/history%20labs.php
Earth Floor Geologic Time Activity – Compare geologic time to the length of a football field, which is 100 yards long.
www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/msese/earthsysflr/geo_activity.html
Radiometric Dating Explained – Here are several very good Web site explaining radiometric dating, one specifically about carbon-14 dating:
www.asa3.org/ASA/resources/Wiens.html
www.c14dating.com/
Three Dimensional Geology – Apply geological concepts to a real-life problem-solving situation and give students an appreciation of the three dimensional nature of rock strata using rocks, fossils, and simulated cores
geologyonline.museum.state.il.us/tools/lessons/12.5/lesson.pdf

Secondary

Geology & Geologic Time

Additional Resources

CD-ROMs

Explore Volcanoes CD-ROM
Order Yours Today!
GSA Sales and Service
Explore Deep Time – Add some real life to your teaching of deep time by using this resource-packed CD-ROM. Contains teacher notes, reproducible student activities, colorful diagrams, images, models, and more!This resource has been developed by school teachers and the matierals are curriculum linked to standards (Grades 5-8, 9-12). On Sale! $9.95. Available from the Geological Society of America, (303) 357-1000, 1-888-443-4472 (toll free), 303-357-1071 (fax).

Elementary

Mapping & Geography

Lesson Plan Links

Mission Geography: USA – (3-5) Xpeditions, National Geographic Society. Students research the culture, physical geography and history of states in each region of the U.S. They then develop a “family travel plan” and create an itinerary to highlight interesting destinations and characteristics of selected states, while working within limitations such as time and available resources.
www.marcopolo-education.org/mg/lesson584.aspx
Florida Geographic Alliance – These lesson plans were developed by teachers through workshops of the Florida Geographic Alliance. These plans cover topics such as mapping, hurricanes, Antarctica, country profiles, dinosaurs, Earth structure, regions, population and forces shaping the Earth. Each plan contains the procedure, time needed, objectives and any other information that may be helpful to educators.
fga.freac.fsu.edu/1995/index.html
Introduction to Latitude and Longitude (K-3) – This lesson introduces students to latitude and longitude. They’ll look at lines of latitude and longitude on a United States map and discuss the reasons why these lines are helpful. They’ll also discuss the ways that temperatures vary with latitude and will explain the clothes they might wear at specific latitudes. Need internet access.
www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/01/gk2/longlat.html

Elementary

Mapping & Geography

Additional Resources

Google Earth – An amazing free program that allows you to view satellite imagery all around the globe and to often amazingly small scales. Find your school or house! A must see for classrooms now, see lesson plans for ideas on how to teach with Google Earth.
http://earth.google.com/
Historical Maps– Historical topographic maps of from various states.
http://historical.maptech.com/index.cfm?CFID=13991498&CFTOKEN=15849189
National Geographic – Visit this site for the following features for teachers: Online Adventure, Maps & Geography, Lesson Plans, Teacher Store, and Teacher Community.
www.nationalgeographic.com/education/
Printable Maps – from the USGS, reference and outline maps, satellite maps, time zone maps and more. Pick any state or the country.
www.nationalatlas.gov/printable.html#reference
USA Geography by Sheppard Software – A great site to help kids learn the states, capitols, and landscapes of the USA. 
http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/web_games.htm

Intermediate

Mapping & Geography

Lesson Plans

Creating Google Earth Tours – Help your students discover the wonder of Google Earth and view spectacular geography with this lesson plan using the unique and free program from Google.

Gilligan’s Island Topographic Mapping Lab – Use your plastic island shoebox models to help students visualize and draw topographic maps.

Mapping Temperature Fields Lab – Help students understand isolines by mapping the temperature isotherms in their own classroom.

Lesson Plan Links

Mapping – Models of the Earth, Labs and lesson plans on mapping from Earth to Class.
earth2class.org/curr_units/models%20labs.php
Google Earth With Students: Lesson on how to teach your students to use the free powerful satellite image program, Google Earth.
www.eastchester.k12.ny.us/schools/hs/teachers/fermann/GE.htm
USGS – A Model of Three Faults – Students make block models to demonstrate plate movement.
http://interactive2.usgs.gov/learningweb/teachers/faults.htm#materials
NASA’s Problem of the Week – Motion of the Magnetic Pole. Activity mapping movement of magnetic pole since 300 AD:
image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/weekly/WeekAC.doc
Three Dimensional Geology – Apply geological concepts to a real-life problem-solving situation and give students an appreciation of the three dimensional nature of rock strata using rocks, fossils, and simulated cores
geologyonline.museum.state.il.us/tools/lessons/12.5/lesson.pdf
Mapping activities:
www.wilson.wnyric.org/t/drobison/webshare/index.php?id=page6
Lesson Plans on Maps: Click on the “What do maps show?” link for some lesson plans about maps, including about map scales and legends:
http://interactive2.usgs.gov/learningweb/teachers/lesson_plans.htm
Florida Geographic Alliance – These lesson plans were developed by teachers through workshops of the Florida Geographic Alliance. These plans cover topics such as mapping, hurricanes, Antarctica, country profiles, dinosaurs, Earth structure, regions, population and forces shaping the Earth. Each plan contains the procedure, time needed, objectives and any other information that may be helpful to educators.
fga.freac.fsu.edu/1995/index.html
Latitude, Longitude, and Mapmaking (6-8) – This lesson requires students to review the concepts of latitude and longitude and to use these concepts to create maps of different countries on the computer. They’ll conclude by discussing the reasons why it’s important to understand latitude and longitude and by creating quizzes in which other students can locate “mystery” places that they map on the computer. Need Internet access.
www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/01/g68/mapmaking.html
Contour Maps with DOGSTAILS (6-8) – Have you ever seen a child construct something from a lump of clay? Were you amazed at the results? During this lesson your students will craft miniature mountains from lumps of clay. They will then translate their mountains into topographic maps. These maps will include vital features and information such as date, orientation, grid, scale, title, author, index, legend, and sources-or DOGSTAILS, for short. When students know what goes into creating a representational map, they are more likely to understand how to analyze the geographic information in other maps.
www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/01/g68/dogstails.html
Mapping Mars – This lesson introduces students to some common map projections and representations (e.g. globes or close-ups) and asks them to consider the ways that each representation can be used to show specific features of Mars. Students will draw three different representations of Mars and will illustrate each one with details of research they have conducted on the planet.
www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/01/g68/marsmap.html
Oil and Water in the Middle East Region (6-8)- In this lesson, students will explore the roles of oil and water in the Middle East, especially in Iraq. Students will use maps to look at the distribution of oil in the Middle East and discuss what it means for the different countries in the region. They will also examine how water has influenced the region historically (in the “fertile crescent” region between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers) and politically (for example, how Iraq’s access to water is limited to one small part of its border). Finally, they will study specific aspects of Iraq’s struggles with water, using satellite imagery to understand and illustrate the problem. Need Internet access.
www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/01/g68/iraqoil.html

Intermediate

Mapping & Geography

Additional Resources

Interactive Internet Sites Books
Google Earth – An amazing and free program that allows you to view satellite imagery all around the globe and to often amazingly small scales. Find your school or house! A must see for classrooms now, see lesson plans for ideas on how to teach with Google Earth.
http://earth.google.com/
 
Historical Maps– Historical topographic maps of from various states.
http://historical.maptech.com/index.cfm?CFID=13991498&CFTOKEN=15849189
Landscape Collection – K-16 students in Vermont are creating a web-based archive of historical and modern photograph pairs documenting 150 years of human interaction with the Vermont landscape. K-12 students work with UVM students to learn how to use GPS, a digital camera, and computer imaging equipment as part of ongoing research to document change in the Vermont landscape from the mid-1800s to the present.
www.uvm.edu/perkins/landscape/.
National Geographic – Visit this site for the following features for teachers: Online Adventure, Maps & Geography, Lesson Plans, Teacher Store, and Teacher Community.
www.nationalgeographic.com/education/
Printable Maps – from the USGS, reference and outline maps, satellite maps, time zone maps and more. Pick any state or the country.
www.nationalatlas.gov/printable.html#reference
Resources related to teaching mapping (no lesson plans).
personal.cmich.edu/~franc1m/locamap.htm
The Sourcebook for Teaching Science – Great source for maps, and there is one activity listed.
www.csun.edu/science/ref/maps/maps.html
Tasa Graphic Arts Company – has produced state of the art multimedia products for use in the Earth Science and Environment Science Classrooms. Of particular interest is the interactive CD-ROM on Introduction to Topographic Maps, as well as programs on plate tectonics and rock and mineral identification. They provide online ordering. To receive a 15% discount for teachers who visit the GSA website, contact Tasa Graphic Arts to receive a special web address and discount code.
www.tasagraphicarts.com, e-mail: info@tasagraphicarts.com, phone: (800) 293-2725 or (505) 758-5535.
Topographic Maps – Landforms depicted on topographic maps:
www.csus.edu/indiv/s/slaymaker/Archives/Geol10L/landforms.htm
The University of Texas, Austin – has prepared an Internet library of all kinds of maps, including topos (free!!) as well as links to other map sites. This is well worth a good look.
http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/united_states.html
USA Geography from Sheppard Software –  A great site for tutoring and testing kids about the location of the states, capitols, and landscapes. Highly recommended.
http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/web_games.htm
Worldwind map – download a free program from NASA that allows you to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth. Using imagery from Landsat and other remote sensing sources, you can “see” the changing snow cover in the northern hemisphere, dust storms in the Sahara and droughts in Africa. May be downloaded onto school computers for student use. Expect long download times (171 MB) on slow connections; this application works best on high end, fast machines.
worldwind.arc.nasa.gov/
Interactive Internet Sites Books
Free from the PALEOMAP Project – This project aims to illustrate the plate tectonic development of the ocean basins and continents, as well as the changing distribution of land and sea during the past 1,100 million years. Visit http://www.scotese.com/free_stuff.htm for instructions for making your own Pangea Antenna Ball. The website also offers free Earth System History-GIS Time Slices. Each time slice consists of the reconstructed positions of present-day continental coastlines, shelf margin, major tectonic boundaries, active plate boundaries, and seafloor spreading isochrons. Because the shapefiles are in decimal latitude and longitude (geographic coordinates), they can be easily transformed to other map projections. To request a free time slice, you must have ArcView 3.x installed on your machine. Choose one of the following time slices: Present-Day, Late Cretaceous (K/T Boundary), Pangea (Late Permian), Rodinia (Late Precambrian), or Pangea Ultima (+250 million years in the future).
Call 1-888-288-0160, or e-mail info@scotese.com with your request.

Secondary

Mapping & Geography

Additional Resources

Interactive Internet Sites Books
Google Earth – An amazing free program that allows you to view satellite imagery all around the globe and to often amazingly small scales. Find your school or house! A must see for classrooms now, see lesson plans for ideas on how to teach with Google Earth.
http://earth.google.com/
Printable Maps – from the USGS, reference and outline maps, satellite maps, time zone maps and more. Pick any state or the country.
www.nationalatlas.gov/printable.html#reference
Historical Maps– Historical topographic maps of from various states.
http://historical.maptech.com/index.cfm?CFID=13991498&CFTOKEN=15849189
Worldwind map – download a free program from NASA that allows you to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth. Using imagery from Landsat and other remote sensing sources, you can “see” the changing snow cover in the northern hemisphere, dust storms in the Sahara and droughts in Africa. May be downloaded onto school computers for student use. Expect long download times (171 MB) on slow connections; this application works best on high end, fast machines.
worldwind.arc.nasa.gov/
The University of Texas, Austin – has prepared an Internet library of all kinds of maps, including topos (free!!) as well as links to other map sites. This is well worth a good look.
http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/united_states.html
Topographic Maps – Landforms depicted on topographic maps:
www.csus.edu/indiv/s/slaymaker/Archives/Geol10L/landforms.htm
Landscape Collection – K-16 students in Vermont are creating a web-based archive of historical and modern photograph pairs documenting 150 years of human interaction with the Vermont landscape. K-12 students work with UVM students to learn how to use GPS, a digital camera, and computer imaging equipment as part of ongoing research to document change in the Vermont landscape from the mid-1800s to the present.
www.uvm.edu/perkins/landscape/.
SEA LEVEL: Frequently asked questions and answers – Find answers to such questions as `What is Mean Sea Level?`, `Why is the sea level higher off the coast of Bermuda than New York?
www.pol.ac.uk/psmsl/puscience/index.html#1
Resources related to teaching mapping (no lesson plans).
personal.cmich.edu/~franc1m/locamap.htm
Tasa Graphic Arts Company – has produced state of the art multimedia products for use in the Earth Science and Environment Science Classrooms. Of particular interest is the interactive CD-ROM on Introduction to Topographic Maps, as well as programs on plate tectonics and rock and mineral identification. They provide online ordering. To receive a 15% discount for teachers who visit the GSA website, contact Tasa Graphic Arts to receive a special web address and discount code.
www.tasagraphicarts.com, e-mail: info@tasagraphicarts.com, phone: (800) 293-2725 or (505) 758-5535.
The Sourcebook for Teaching Science – Great source for maps, and there is one activity listed.
www.csun.edu/science/ref/maps/maps.html
National Geographic – Visit this site for the following features for teachers: Online Adventure, Maps & Geography, Lesson Plans, Teacher Store, and Teacher Community.
www.nationalgeographic.com/education/
Interactive Internet Sites Books
Free from the PALEOMAP Project – This project aims to illustrate the plate tectonic development of the ocean basins and continents, as well as the changing distribution of land and sea during the past 1,100 million years. Visit http://www.scotese.com/free_stuff.htm for instructions for making your own Pangea Antenna Ball. The website also offers free Earth System History-GIS Time Slices. Each time slice consists of the reconstructed positions of present-day continental coastlines, shelf margin, major tectonic boundaries, active plate boundaries, and seafloor spreading isochrons. Because the shapefiles are in decimal latitude and longitude (geographic coordinates), they can be easily transformed to other map projections. To request a free time slice, you must have ArcView 3.x installed on your machine. Choose one of the following time slices: Present-Day, Late Cretaceous (K/T Boundary), Pangea (Late Permian), Rodinia (Late Precambrian), or Pangea Ultima (+250 million years in the future).
Call 1-888-288-0160, or e-mail info@scotese.com with your request.

Elementary

Paleontology

Lesson Plan Links

Life Has a History – introduces students to the history of life and how it results in today’s biodiversity.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/intro/index.html
Discovering Dinosaurs – What were dinosaurs like? This is a lesson plan, intended for K-5, teaching about dinosaurs. It includes suggested activities, adaptations, and links to worksheet masters.
www.school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/tlc-dinosaurs/
Paleontology: The Big Dig – Online discovery – See what scientists are learning about dinosaurs and other prehistoric life. There is also a link to activities where you can learn to draw dinosaur bones, dig for buried bones, and identify fossils.
www.ology.amnh.org/paleontology/
Zoom Dinosaurs – is a comprehensive on-line hypertext book about dinosaurs. It is designed for students of all ages and levels of comprehension. It has an easy-to-use structure that allows readers to start at a basic level on each topic, and then to progress to much more advanced information as desired, simply by clicking on links. Contains some activities, lesson plans, quizzes, puzzles and games.
www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/dinosaurs/index.html

Elementary

Paleontology & Evolution

Additional Resources

Understanding Evolution – Written for teachers but accessible to the general public, this site provides “one-stop shopping” for evolution education. The web site is rich in content, with sections on the nature of science, evolution itself, the different lines of evidence supporting evidence, evolution’s relevance to everyday life, widespread misconceptions about evolution, and the history of evolutionary thought.
evolution.berkeley.edu
Dino Productions – This Web Site provides you with an extensive resource for your dinosaur needs. Catalog has over 1500 fascinating products.
www.dsuper.net/~dinoprod/welcome.html
Science Spot – Links to Dinosaur and Fossil Links
www.sciencespot.net/Pages/kdzdino.html
Kid’s Web Dinosaur Links – links to pictures of dinosaurs and dino exhibits.
psych.hanover.edu/kidsweb/dino.html
Dino Russ’ Lair – Tons of cool dinosaur and vertebrate paleontology information.
www.isgs.uiuc.edu/dinos/dinos_home.html
Willo: The Dinosaur With a Heart – The information is fascinating and fifteen minutes on this easy to navigate site will be very rewarding for anyone with an interest in these creatures.
www.dinoheart.org/index.html
Voyage Into Archaeology – The site is organized around interactive story boards, called paths, numbered in the order in which archaeological work proceeds: how to (1) look for sites, (2) decide where to dig, (3) excavate, (4) interpret findings, (5) understand a site in its natural environment, and (6) tell others about what you have learned. Has some flaws, but generally good info.
www.educ.sfu.ca/archaeology/voyage1.htm
Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center
A new 20,000 square foot dinosaur museum in Woodland Park, Colorado. Exhibits include huge marine reptiles, pterosaurs, remarkable dinosaurs, a visible working fossil lab, educational activities, interactive children’s area.
www.rmdrc.com

Intermediate

Paleontology & Evolution

Lesson Plans

Denver’s Prehistoric Journey – Exploring the evidence of prehistoric life in the Prehistoric Journey exhibit at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. The student pages were created to help students on their path through the Prehistoric Journey exhibit at the DMNS, located at 2001 Colorado Boulevard, Denver, CO, 303-322-7009/1-800-925-2250.

Lesson Plan Links

Life Has a History – introduces students to the history of life and how it results in today’s biodiversity.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/intro/index.html
Getting Into the Fossil Record – helps students gain a basic understanding of what a fossil is and how a fossil forms. Need computer access, adaptable to elementary.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/fossil/index.html
Understanding Geologic Time – introduces students to geologic time, the evidence for events in Earth’s history, relative and absolute dating techniques, and the significance of the geologic time scale. Need computer access, adaptable to elementary.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/geotime/index.html
Stories From the Fossil Record – provides students with a basic understanding of how fossils can be used to interpret the past. There are four different pathways to explore: biodiversity, geologic time, paleoecology and past lives. Need computer access, adaptable to elementary.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/stories/index.html
Adventures at Dry Creek – virtually engages students in scientific research. Students join “science mentors” to gather data and interpret direct and indirect evidence to propose multiple hypotheses of what life was like in Montana 60-70 million years ago. Need student computer access.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/reslab/newdc/index.html
Crocs, Then and Now (6-8) – This lesson has students investigate the geographical distributions, habitats, and other features of modern crocodilians and Super Croc (Sarcosuchus imperator). Students will consider the things we can learn about one species by studying the other. They will create Venn diagrams to compare and contrast one modern species with SuperCroc. They will conclude by writing paragraphs describing this comparison and explaining how each species helps us learn about the other. Need Internet connection.
www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/08/g68/crocsthennow.html
Learning From the Fossil Record – A collection of informative papers and activities to assist teachers in using paleontology and related fields to teach major concepts in science. They also help to tell part of the story of the Earth.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fosrec/Learning.html
Who’s On First – A relative dating activity.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fosrec/BarBar.html
Excavating Your Recycling Bin as a Fossil Record – Simulate how scientists study the past. Scientists use layers of rock with fossils to understand the past.
askeric.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Science/Paleontology/PAL0003.html
Dinosaur Dig – To give a classroom experience of how difficult it is to interpret a paleontological discovery while being in a classroom environment. Uses wooden models of selected dinosaurs to demonstrate a procedure a field paleontologist may use.
askeric.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Science/Paleontology/PAL0001.html
Zoom Dinosaurs – is a comprehensive on-line hypertext book about dinosaurs. It is designed for students of all ages and levels of comprehension. It has an easy-to-use structure that allows readers to start at a basic level on each topic, and then to progress to much more advanced information as desired, simply by clicking on links. Contains some activities, lesson plans, quizzes, puzzles and games.
www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/dinosaurs/index.html

Intermediate

Paleontology & Evolution

Additional Resources

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books
Evolution Special Report: from NewScientist.com. Especially note the interactive graphic.
www.newscientist.com/channel/life/evolution
Evolution Resources from the National Academies
www.nationalacademies.org/evolution/
Dinosaurs – helps students answer questions about dinosaurs: What makes a dinosaur “a dinosaur”? Where did they live? What caused their mass extinction? Students can participate in a virtual dinosaur discovery, follow milestones in dinosaur evolution, and see behind-the-scenes slideshows of the lab environment where vertebrate specimens are prepared for exhibits and research. Test is small and higher level than elementary readers. (NMNH,SI)
http://www.nmnh.si.edu/paleo/dinosaurs/
Dinosaurs: Ancient Fossils, New Discoveries – updates what we know about dinosaurs from recent studies of their tracks, how they moved, and their unusual body parts (e.g. spikes, armor). “Extinction” examines the mass extinction 65 million years ago — the possible causes, how many of the plants and animals alive at that time died out, and which dinosaurs survived. Interviews with paleontologists are included. (AMNH,SI)
http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/dinosaurs/
Life of a Vertebrate Fossil – traces the journey of fossils from discovery to display. Find out what paleontologists do in each stage a vertebrate fossil’s life. Learn about digging up fossils, getting them to the laboratory, preparing them for research and exhibition, and understanding what they say about past life. (NMNH,SI)
http://www.nmnh.si.edu/paleo/LVF/#start
Evolution Directory – How does this issue affect your life? Peer-reviewed articles and links from actionbiosciences.org of American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).
www.actionbioscience.org/evolution/
Understanding Evolution – Written for teachers but accessible to the general public, this site provides “one-stop shopping” for evolution education. The web site is rich in content, with sections on the nature of science, evolution itself, the different lines of evidence supporting evidence, evolution’s relevance to everyday life, widespread misconceptions about evolution, and the history of evolutionary thought.
evolution.berkeley.edu
Dino Productions – This Web Site provides you with an extensive resource for your dinosaur needs. Catalog has over 1500 fascinating products.
www.dsuper.net/~dinoprod/welcome.html
Science Spot – Links to Dinosaur and Fossil Links
www.sciencespot.net/Pages/kdzdino.html
Kid’s Web Dinosaur Links – links to pictures of dinosaurs and dino exhibits.
psych.hanover.edu/kidsweb/dino.html
Dino Russ’ Lair – Tons of cool dinosaur and vertebrate paleontology information.
www.isgs.uiuc.edu/dinos/dinos_home.html
Willo: The Dinosaur With a Heart – The information is fascinating and fifteen minutes on this easy to navigate site will be very rewarding for anyone with an interest in these creatures.
www.dinoheart.org/index.html
Voyage Into Archaeology – The site is organized around interactive story boards, called paths, numbered in the order in which archaeological work proceeds: how to (1) look for sites, (2) decide where to dig, (3) excavate, (4) interpret findings, (5) understand a site in its natural environment, and (6) tell others about what you have learned. Has some flaws, but generally good info.
www.educ.sfu.ca/archaeology/voyage1.htm
DINOSAURNEWS – A Webzine that last year delivered 740 dinosaur stories of international interest. This year they’ll bring you 750 more! Site has great links to other dinosaur sites.
Visit the site at www.dinosaurnews.org or get a free subscription to DinosaurNews – Send an email to: subscribe@dinosaurnews.org.
Dinosaur and Paleontology Dictionary: From A to Z – You can find lots of information about dinosaurs, including how to pronounce their names.
www.zoomdinosaurs.com/subjects/dinosaurs/glossary/
Paleontology at Universities – Glen J. Kuban (gkpaleo@yahoo.com). Part of Kuban’s Paleo Place Emporia State University Geology Museum Evolution entrance to the University of California Museum of Paleontology, Berkeley.
members.aol.com/fostrak/paleuniv.htm
University of California Museum of Paleontology – Hadean Time Article describes the time when the solar system was forming, 4.5 to 3.8 billion years ago, before the beginning of Earth’s rock record and the Archaean.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/precambrian/hadean.html
New York Paleontology – State University of New York, Binghamton. Delve into the state’s Devonian stratigraphic column and the fossils preserved within it.
bingwe23 May, 2008b>University of Arizona. Discover a lexicon of terms related to the study of fossils, especially dinosaurs. Definitions explain scientific and common names and fossil features.
www.geo.arizona.edu/geo3xx/308/glossary.html
Fossil Gallery – University of Oslo Paleontology Museum. Gallery of fossils on display, including dinosaurs, and a timeline of geological history.
www.nhm.uio.no/palmus/galleri/index_e.html
Paleontology Links – Illinois State University. Offers a collection of societies, associations, journals, and dinosaur links of interest to those in the field of paleontology.
www.museum.state.il.us/isas/paleo.html
Museum of Paleontology – University of Michigan. Museum housing a collection of fossils features research collections, a collections database, and related links.
www.ummp.lsa.umich.edu
The Paleontological Society –
www.paleosoc.org
National Center for Science Education – will be posting past issues of the publication Creation/Evolution Journal, first started by the American Humanist Association in 1980, and the first to devote itself entirely to the creation/evolution controversy. The first two completed issues are online.
www.ncseweb.org – select Resources from the top navigation bar and then Creation/Evolution Journal from the right side navigation.
The Fossil Record at the Museum of Paleontology – University of California at Berkeley. This contains a set of 19 lessons and activities that teachers can directly download from the web. The site contains a matrix that correlates the activities to grade level and the National Science Standards.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fosrec/fosrec.html
Teaching Evolution in School Science Classes by David L. Haury; a paper from the ERIC Digest – Great information to help teachers explain the importance and the history of evolution.
www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed402148.html
Postglacial Flooding of the Bering Land Bridge – A GEOSPATIAL ANIMATION from the University of Colorado, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) were used to create movies showing how the Bering Land Bridge evolved after the Last Glacial Maximum, about 21,000 years ago. Global sea level at that time was approximately 120 m (400 ft) lower than today. The Land Bridge existed as a vast tundra plain connecting Asia and North America. As the world’s glaciers and ice sheets melted over the following thousands of years, rising sea level flooded the Land Bridge -blocking migration routes for animals and humans.` View the animation through large 3.8 MB, medium 1.6 MB, and small windows 0.5 MB (Audience: all)
instaar.Colorado.EDU/QGISL/bering_land_bridge/
Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center
A new 20,000 square foot dinosaur museum in Woodland Park, Colorado. Exhibits include huge marine reptiles, pterosaurs, remarkable dinosaurs, a visible working fossil lab, educational activities, interactive children’s area.
www.rmdrc.com
Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books
Earth Revealed: Evolution Through Time (program 11). Continuously aired on PBS, this video series is for high school and undergraduate students. The evolution video traces fossil evidence. Annenberg/CPB Resources; site has current broadcast dates and info on how to purchase videos and textbook , study guide, and teacher guide.
www.learner.org/resources/resource.html
A great list of videos about dinosaurs – too many to list here. Go to the DinosaurNews link and then click on Dinomall
http://www.dinosaurnews.org/
Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books

The Teacher-Friendly Guide to the Geology of the Northeastern U.S., by Jane Ansley, 2000. Written as a teacher preparation and information resource, this guide provides teachers with background on the regional geology of the Northeast. Ties in national science education standards and inquiry-based teaching. Contains corresponding student activities for each topic. Designed for middle and high school level science teachers but applicable to any level. Paleontological Research Institution Publications, 1259 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850; (www.priweb.org), $25.

Nest of Dinosaurs: The Story of the OviraptorNest of Dinosaurs: The Story of the Oviraptor, by Norell, Mark A. and Lowell Dingus. Grade 5 (but interesting to anyone with an interest in fossil hunting). The authors chronicle the expeditions into the desolate area of the Gobi Desert in Mongolia where the first dinosaur nests were found. Hardcover: ISBN 0385325584.

Tiniest GiantsTiniest Giants, by Dingus, Lowell and Luis Chiappe. Although this book is meant for 10-year-olds, all ages can appreciate this story. It chronicles the fossil-hunting expedition of a group of Argentinean and American paleontologists who found the first fossilized embryonic dinosaur skin. Hardcover: ISBN 0385326424.

Secondary

Paleontology & Evolution

Lesson Plans

Denver’s Prehistoric Journey – (7-12) – A guide for taking students to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science Prehistoric Journey. For Colorado Front Range teachers able to go on a field trip in Denver.

Lesson Plan Links

Life Has a History – introduces students to the history of life and how it results in today’s biodiversity.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/intro/index.html
Getting Into the Fossil Record – helps students gain a basic understanding of what a fossil is and how a fossil forms. Need computer access, adaptable to elementary.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/fossil/index.html
Understanding Geologic Time – introduces students to geologic time, the evidence for events in Earth’s history, relative and absolute dating techniques, and the significance of the geologic time scale. Need computer access, adaptable to elementary.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/geotime/index.html
Stories From the Fossil Record – provides students with a basic understanding of how fossils can be used to interpret the past. There are four different pathways to explore: biodiversity, geologic time, paleoecology and past lives. Need computer access, adaptable to elementary.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/stories/index.html
Adventures at Dry Creek – virtually engages students in scientific research. Students join “science mentors” to gather data and interpret direct and indirect evidence to propose multiple hypotheses of what life was like in Montana 60-70 million years ago. Need student computer access.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/reslab/newdc/index.html
What Did T.rex Taste Like? – provides an introduction to cladistics (a way of organizing living things by common ancestry and evolutionary relationships) and involves students in posing hypotheses about past life based upon evolutionary history. Need computer access, adaptable for grades 7&8.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/Trex/index.html
The Evolution of Flight – examines evidence from the fossil record, behavior, biomechanics and cladistic analysis to interpret the sequence of events that led to flight in the dinosaur lineage. Students gather, organize and analyze data and then propose hypotheses about the evolution of flight in birds. Need computer access, adaptable to grades 7-8.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/reslab/flight/main.htm
Learning From the Fossil Record – A collection of informative papers and activities to assist teachers in using paleontology and related fields to teach major concepts in science. They also help to tell part of the story of the Earth.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fosrec/Learning.html
Who’s On First – A relative dating activity.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fosrec/BarBar.html
Excavating Your Recycling Bin as a Fossil Record – Simulate how scientists study the past. Scientists use layers of rock with fossils to understand the past.
askeric.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Science/Paleontology/PAL0003.html
Dinosaur Dig – To give a classroom experience of how difficult it is to interpret a paleontological discovery while being in a classroom environment. Uses wooden models of selected dinosaurs to demonstrate a procedure a field paleontologist may use.
askeric.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Science/Paleontology/PAL0001.html
Zoom Dinosaurs – is a comprehensive on-line hypertext book about dinosaurs. It is designed for students of all ages and levels of comprehension. It has an easy-to-use structure that allows readers to start at a basic level on each topic, and then to progress to much more advanced information as desired, simply by clicking on links. Contains some activities, lesson plans, quizzes, puzzles and games.
www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/dinosaurs/index.html

Secondary

Paleontology & Evolution

Additional Resources

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books
Evolution Special Report: from NewScientist.com. Especially note the interactive graphic.
www.newscientist.com/channel/life/evolution
Evolution Resources from the National Academies
www.nationalacademies.org/evolution/
Dinosaurs – helps students answer questions about dinosaurs: What makes a dinosaur “a dinosaur”? Where did they live? What caused their mass extinction? Students can participate in a virtual dinosaur discovery, follow milestones in dinosaur evolution, and see behind-the-scenes slideshows of the lab environment where vertebrate specimens are prepared for exhibits and research. Test is small and higher level than elementary readers. (NMNH,SI)
http://www.nmnh.si.edu/paleo/dinosaurs/
Dinosaurs: Ancient Fossils, New Discoveries – updates what we know about dinosaurs from recent studies of their tracks, how they moved, and their unusual body parts (e.g. spikes, armor). “Extinction” examines the mass extinction 65 million years ago — the possible causes, how many of the plants and animals alive at that time died out, and which dinosaurs survived. Interviews with paleontologists are included. (AMNH,SI)
http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/dinosaurs/
Life of a Vertebrate Fossil – traces the journey of fossils from discovery to display. Find out what paleontologists do in each stage a vertebrate fossil’s life. Learn about digging up fossils, getting them to the laboratory, preparing them for research and exhibition, and understanding what they say about past life. (NMNH,SI)
http://www.nmnh.si.edu/paleo/LVF/#start
Evolution Directory – How does this issue affect your life? Peer-reviewed articles and links from actionbiosciences.org of American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).
www.actionbioscience.org/evolution/
Understanding Evolution – Written for teachers but accessible to the general public, this site provides “one-stop shopping” for evolution education. The web site is rich in content, with sections on the nature of science, evolution itself, the different lines of evidence supporting evidence, evolution’s relevance to everyday life, widespread misconceptions about evolution, and the history of evolutionary thought.
evolution.berkeley.edu
NOVA: Origins – Has the universe always existed? What was the birth of our planet like? Are we alone, or are there alien worlds waiting to be discovered? NOVA presents some startling new answers in “Origins,” a NOVA miniseries hosted by dynamic astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History. This Web site presents many of the facts and ideas in the series as well as interactive programs that delve into these questions and more.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/origins/
Dino Productions – This Web Site provides you with an extensive resource for your dinosaur needs. Catalog has over 1500 fascinating products.
www.dsuper.net/~dinoprod/welcome.html
Science Spot – Links to Dinosaur and Fossil Links
www.sciencespot.net/Pages/kdzdino.html
Kid’s Web Dinosaur Links – links to pictures of dinosaurs and dino exhibits.
psych.hanover.edu/kidsweb/dino.html
Dino Russ’ Lair – Tons of cool dinosaur and vertebrate paleontology information.
www.isgs.uiuc.edu/dinos/dinos_home.html
Willo: The Dinosaur With a Heart – The information is fascinating and fifteen minutes on this easy to navigate site will be very rewarding for anyone with an interest in these creatures.
www.dinoheart.org/index.html
Voyage Into Archaeology – The site is organized around interactive story boards, called paths, numbered in the order in which archaeological work proceeds: how to (1) look for sites, (2) decide where to dig, (3) excavate, (4) interpret findings, (5) understand a site in its natural environment, and (6) tell others about what you have learned. Has some flaws, but generally good info.
www.educ.sfu.ca/archaeology/voyage1.htm
DINOSAURNEWS – A Webzine that last year delivered 740 dinosaur stories of international interest. This year they’ll bring you 750 more! Site has great links to other dinosaur sites.
Visit the site at www.dinosaurnews.org or get a free subscription to DinosaurNews – Send an email to: subscribe@dinosaurnews.org.
The University of California at Berkeley – website does a great job of explaining “What Paleontology is NOT” by describing the different methods and areas of focus of paleontology, anthropology, and archaeology.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/exhibit/paleontology.html
Paleontology at Universities – Glen J. Kuban (gkpaleo@yahoo.com). Part of Kuban’s Paleo Place, Emporia State University Geology Museum. Evolution entrance to the University of California Museum of Paleontology, Berkeley.
members.aol.com/fostrak/paleuniv.htm
University of California Museum of Paleontology – Hadean Time Article describes the time when the solar system was forming, 4.5 to 3.8 billion years ago, before the beginning of Earth’s rock record and the Archaean.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/precambrian/hadean.html
State University of New York, Binghamton – New York Paleontology – Delve into the state’s Devonian stratigraphic column and the fossils preserved within it.
bingweb.binghamton.edu/~kwilson
University of Arizona – Paleontology – Discover a lexicon of terms related to the study of fossils, especially dinosaurs. Definitions explain scientific and common names and fossil features.
www.geo.arizona.edu/geo3xx/308/glossary.html
University of Oslo Paleontology Museum – Fossil Gallery – Gallery of fossils on display, including dinosaurs, and a timeline of geological history.
www.nhm.uio.no/palmus/galleri/index_e.html
Paleontology Links – Illinois State University – Offers a collection of societies, associations, journals, and dinosaur links of interest to those in the field of paleontology.
www.museum.state.il.us/isas/paleo.html
University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology – Museum housing a collection of fossils features research collections, a collections database, and related links.
www.ummp.lsa.umich.edu
NSTA News Stories – Paleontological discoveries are hot news right now! Discover what’s new in old fossils. Use these opportunities to link today’s headlines to your science unit on fossils, dinosaurs, or paleontology. Click here for the latest news stories.
ecommerce.nsta.org/enewsletter/2002-09/news_stories.htm
The Paleontological Society –
www.paleosoc.org
National Center for Science Education – will be posting past issues of the publication Creation/Evolution Journal, first started by the American Humanist Association in 1980, and the first to devote itself entirely to the creation/evolution controversy. The first two completed issues are online.
www.ncseweb.org – select Resources from the top navigation bar and then Creation/Evolution Journal from the right side navigation.
The Paleogeographic Atlas Project – this site offers an extremely well referenced resource for paleogeography, paleoclimatology, and paleobotany. Animations, maps, and slide shows are available 290 Ma to present, with the site specializing in the paleogeography of the Permian and Jurassic. Audience: College (or advanced high school) and up.
pgap.uchicago.edu/PGAPhome.html
Articles on the state of Evolution vs. “Intelligent Design” –
www.ncseweb.org/article.asp
Teaching Evolution in School Science Classes by David L. Haury; a paper from the ERIC Digest – Great information to help teachers explain the importance and the history of evolution.
www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed402148.html
Postglacial Flooding of the Bering Land Bridge – A GEOSPATIAL ANIMATION from the University of Colorado, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) were used to create movies showing how the Bering Land Bridge evolved after the Last Glacial Maximum, about 21,000 years ago. Global sea level at that time was approximately 120 m (400 ft) lower than today. The Land Bridge existed as a vast tundra plain connecting Asia and North America. As the world’s glaciers and ice sheets melted over the following thousands of years, rising sea level flooded the Land Bridge -blocking migration routes for animals and humans.` View the animation through large 3.8 MB, medium 1.6 MB, and small windows 0.5 MB (Audience: all)
instaar.Colorado.EDU/QGISL/bering_land_bridge/
Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center
A new 20,000 square foot dinosaur museum in Woodland Park, Colorado. Exhibits include huge marine reptiles, pterosaurs, remarkable dinosaurs, a visible working fossil lab, educational activities, interactive children’s area.
www.rmdrc.com
Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books
Earth Revealed: Evolution Through Time (program 11). Continuously aired on PBS, this video series is for high school and undergraduate students. The evolution video traces fossil evidence. Annenberg/CPB Resources; site has current broadcast dates and info on how to purchase videos and textbook , study guide, and teacher guide.
www.learner.org/resources/resource.html
A great list of videos about dinosaurs – too many to list here. Go to the DinosaurNews link and then click on Dinomall
http://www.dinosaurnews.org/
Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books

The Teacher-Friendly Guide to the Geology of the Northeastern U.S. by Jane Ansley, 2000. Written as a teacher preparation and information resource, this guide provides teachers with background on the regional geology of the Northeast. Ties in national science education standards and inquiry-based teaching. Contains corresponding student activities for each topic. Designed for middle and high school level science teachers but applicable to any level. Paleontological Research Institution Publications, 1259 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850; (www.priweb.org), $25.

Elementary

Plate Tectonics

Lesson Plans

Towel Geology (K-12) – Demonstrate a wide range of geologic principles and processes using GeoArt, an artistic approach to promote critical thinking about geology and geologic processes.

Lesson Plan Links

Landforms – Students learn how water and erosion affect the landscape, research a specific landform, and create a visual display of landforms.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/landforms/
Volcanoes – Classic plan to make a volcano in the classroom.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/understanding/

Intermediate

Plate Tectonics

Lesson Plans

Mid-ocean Ridge Spreading Demonstration Model – This student activity allows students to create their own model, using foam board and a shoebox, of the mid-ocean ridge in order to help them understand sea-floor spreading.

Sea Floor Spreading Made Easy – (6-12) – During a unit on plate tectonics, use this activity to demonstrate how sea-floor spreading works and the evidence for it, which therefore reinforces the evidence for the plate tectonics theory.

Towel Geology – (K-12) – Demonstrate a wide range of geologic principles and processes using GeoArt, an artistic approach to promote critical thinking about geology and geologic processes.

Real Evidence of a Subducting Plate – (8-12) – Hands-on approach to examining real earthquake evidence of the South American subduction zone where the Nazca Plate and the South American Plate are colliding. With this activity you can see how geologists came up with the idea of a subducting slab.

Lesson Plan Links

Landforms – Students learn how water and erosion affect the landscape, research a specific landform, and create a visual display of landforms.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/landforms/
Volcanoes – Classic plan to make a volcano in the classroom.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/understanding/
Evacuating a Volcano: A Simulation – To explore hazards associated with cataclysmic natural events, and human responses to them.
volcano.und.nodak.edu/vwdocs/vwlessons/Lesson1/lesson1.html
Earthshaking Events – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, Feb. 2001 p. 33. Students create their own version of a seismograph to understand how scientists use this tool to measure earthquake vibrations. National Science Education Standard D: Earth and Space Science-Structure of the earth system.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/mojave/mojave02a.html
The Mountain Blows Its Top – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, May 2000. In this activity students demonstrate some of the geologic processes involved in the eruption of Mount St. Helens in May 1980
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/green_mansions/posterback.html

Intermediate

Plate Tectonics

Additional Resources

Interactive Internet Sites Books
Transforming California is a PowerPoint presentation of digital images exploring the landforms found along the San Andreas Fault. Designed for classroom use, Transforming California has a complementing narrative for each slide.
http://www.priweb.org/ed/earthtrips/transforming_ca_home.htm
NOVA episode “Magnetic Storm” – A great illustration of how the magnetic field works, what its “function” is, and the changes that take place within it. Can be purchased at:
www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/magnetic/. There are also several activities and print resources available at the NOVA website.
All About Plate Tectonics – Interactive and colorful site on plate tectonics
www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/astronomy/planets/earth/Continents.shtml
On-Line TUTORIAL: This site was designed to allow students to interactively learn about Plate Tectonics and related phenomena. There are learning modules and activity modules. Learning modules are mostly text with little interaction. Students who function at different levels may use this site. The Southern California Integrated GPS Network Education Module.
scign.jpl.nasa.gov/learn/index.htm
This Dynamic Earth – Read about plate tectonics and continental drift, the development of the theory, and unanswered questions.
pubs.usgs.gov/publications/text/dynamic.htm
PBS: Mountain Maker, Earth Shaker – Move any of the four tectonic plates to start an earthquake, make land masses collide, spread the seas, or initiate your own continental drift.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/tryit/tectonics/
Tasa Graphic Arts Company – has produced state of the art multimedia products for use in the Earth Science and Environment Science Classrooms. Of particular interest are interactive CD-ROMs on the Theory of Plate Tectonics, Plate Tectonics and How the Earth Works, the Dynamic Earth, Plate Tectonics 3-D Puzzle, as well as Hands-On Mineral Identification and the Wonder of Rocks and Minerals, among others. They provide online ordering. To receive a 15% discount for teachers who visit the GSA website, contact Tasa Graphic Arts to receive a special web address and discount code.
www.tasagraphicarts.com, e-mail: info@tasagraphicarts.com, phone: 1-800-293-2725 or (505) 758-5535.
On-Line TUTORIAL: A tour of volcanoes in the United States. It is an excellent tutorial in volcanism. Teachers will find this site useful as will middle and high school students. This site also includes a great tutorial on Plate Tectonics. United State Geological Survey.
http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/volcus/
On-Line TUTORIAL: This site was designed to allow students to interactively learn about Plate Tectonics and related phenomena. There are learning modules and activity modules. Learning modules are mostly text with little interaction. Students who function at different levels may use this site. The Southern California Integrated GPS Network Education Module.
http://scign.jpl.nasa.gov/learn/index.htm
Volcano World Online –
http://volcano.und.nodak.edu/vwdocs/Online/
EARTH SCIENCE INTERNET CAMPUS: from EOA Scientific Systems (site suggested by Tom McGuire, Earth Science Author & Consultant), Find a series of clever, interactive, shockwave animations, ranging in size from 36 K to 2000 K, that can be used to introduce the following concepts:
1. Earth: Earthquakes, Seismic Waves and Activity, Earthquake Epicenter; Tectonic Plates and Tectonic Mapping; Glaciers; Hydrological Cycle;
2. Ocean: Sea Pressure and Depth; Secchi Disk; Animal Adaptations – Animals Which Camouflage; Fill the Earth with Oceans (sea level change);
3. Atmosphere: Variations of Tropospheric Thickness; Temperature of the Atmosphere; Wind Direction – The Jet Stream / Jet Stream Map; The Coriolis Effect; Sun’s Radiation on Earth – Angle of Incidence/solar altitude; Weather Education, Facts and Trivia; Lightning Game;
4. Space: The Solar System Planets; Satellite Remote Sensing / Taking Satellite Pictures;
5. Science: Periodic Table of Elements; Weight Mass Volume Density Gravity; Characteristics of All Waves.
To access the animations go to http://www.eoascientific.com/prototype/newcampus/campus.html, and then look for “interactive exercises” under the “earth,” “ocean,” “atmosphere,” “space,” and “science” links. Audience: Middle School and Up.
Need a classroom of powerful computers, will have you download Shockwave.
Earthquake tutorial from New Mexico –
http://tremor.nmt.edu/

Interactive Internet Sites Books

Big Bang: The Story of the Universe, by Couper, Heather and others. Grades 6-Adult. From the “Big Bang” to the present, the story of the Universe is told as an unfolding saga. Hardcover: ISBN 0789414848.

The Teacher-Friendly Guide to the Geology of the Northeastern U.S., by Jane Ansley, 2000. Written as a teacher preparation and information resource, this guide provides teachers with background on the regional geology of the Northeast. Ties in national science education standards and inquiry-based teaching. Contains corresponding student activities for each topic. Designed for middle and high school level science teachers but applicable to any level. Paleontological Research Institution Publications, 1259 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850; (www.priweb.org), $25.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

Earthquakes and Volcanoes, by Booth, Basil. New York: New Discovery Books, 1992. Public Juv QE521.3.B66 1992.

Volcanes Y Terremotos/Volcanoes and Earthquakes, by Booth, Basil. Mexico D.F.: Fernandez Editores, 1994. Public Juv QE521.3 .B6618 1994.

Shake, Rattle, and Roll: The World’s Most Amazing Volcanoes, Earthquakes, and Other Forces, Christian, Spencer and Antonia Felix. New York: J. Wiley and Sons, 1997. Public Juv. QE521.3.C47 1997.

Francis, the Earthquake Dog, Judith Ross Enderle. San Francisco, CA: Chronicle Books, 1996. Public Juv PZ7.E6965 Fr 1996.

Planet Earth, Mark Pettigrew. Los Angeles, CA: Price Stren Sloan, 1987. Public Juv QE29 .P47 1987

Earthquakes, Simon, Seymour. New York, NY: Morrow Junior Books, 1991. Public Juv QE521.3 .S54 1991.

Janice VanCleave’s Earthquakes: Mind-Boggling Experiments You Can Turn into Science Fair Projects, Janice Pratt VanCleave. New York, NY: Wiley, 1993. Public Juv QE521.3 .V37 1993.

Eyewitness: Volcano and Earthquake, Susanna Van Rose. New York, NY: Knopf, distributed by Random House, 1992. Public Juv QE521.3 .V36 1992.

Secondary

Plate Tectonics

Lesson Plans

Mid-ocean Ridge Spreading Demonstration Model – This student activity allows students to create their own model, using foam board and a shoebox, of the mid-ocean ridge in order to help them understand sea-floor spreading.

Sea-Floor Spreading Made Easy – (6-12) – During a unit on plate tectonics, use this activity to demonstrate how sea-floor spreading works and the evidence for it, which therefore reinforces the evidence for the plate tectonics theory.

Real Evidence of a Subducting Plate – (9-12) – Hands-on approach to examining real earthquake evidence of the South American subduction zone where the Nazca Plate and the South American Plate are colliding. With this activity you can see how geologists came up with the idea of a subducting slab.

Towel Geology – (K-12) – Demonstrate a wide range of geologic principles and processes using GeoArt, an artistic approach to promote critical thinking about geology and geologic processes.

Lesson Plan Links

A Model of Sea-Floor Spreading – Paper model of sea-floor spreading showing the evolution of oceanic crust through sea-floor spreading and subduction:
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fosrec/Metzger3.html
ArcLesson on Plate Tectonics – Using the This Dynamic Planet interactive web-based GIS, students investigate plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, and impact craters. This lesson provides an introduction to thinking spatially and makes an excellent bridge to further investigations using desktop GIS software. Need a Web browser to use.
http://gis.esri.com/industries/education/arclessons/search_results.cfm?id=301
Plate Tectonic Rates and Fingernail Growth – They say that plates move at about the rate of your fingernail growth. Is that true?  Visit this site to see. 
http://jclahr.com/science/earth_science/thumbnail/index.html

Secondary

Plate Tectonics

Additional Resources

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books & Maps
All About Plate Tectonics – Interactive and colorful site on plate tectonics
www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/astronomy/planets/earth/Continents.shtml
Magnetostratigraphy – Magnetostratigraphy is a chronostratigraphic technique used to date sedimentary and volcanic stratigraphic sections. Learn about it at this site.
http://magstrat.com/Magnetostr.html
On-Line TUTORIAL: This site was designed to allow students to interactively learn about Plate Tectonics and related phenomena. There are learning modules and activity modules. Learning modules are mostly text with little interaction. Students who function at different levels may use this site. The Southern California Integrated GPS Network Education Module.
scign.jpl.nasa.gov/learn/index.htm
On-Line TUTORIAL: A tour of volcanoes in the United States. It is an excellent tutorial in volcanism. Teachers will find this site useful as will middle and high school students. This site also includes a great tutorial on Plate Tectonics. United State Geological Survey.
http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/volcus/
On-Line TUTORIAL: This site was designed to allow students to interactively learn about Plate Tectonics and related phenomena. There are learning modules and activity modules. Learning modules are mostly text with little interaction. Students who function at different levels may use this site. The Southern California Integrated GPS Network Education Module.
http://scign.jpl.nasa.gov/learn/index.htm
PBS: Mountain Maker, Earth Shaker – Move any of the four tectonic plates to start an earthquake, make land masses collide, spread the seas, or initiate your own continental drift.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/tryit/tectonics/
Plate Motion – Daily position estimates are determined from satellite signals which are recorded by GPS receivers on the ground. Data from the IGS, SCIGN, BARD, CORS, BARGEN, and PANGA networks have been analyzed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, CA Institute of Technology.. Horizontal velocities, mostly due to motion of the Earth’s tectonic plates and deformation in plate boundary zones, are represented on the maps by arrows extending from each site.
http://sideshow.jpl.nasa.gov/mbh/series.html
Plate Motion Calculator – online plate velocity calculator from UNAVCO.
http://sps.unavco.org/cru
Tasa Graphic Arts Company – has produced state of the art multimedia products for use in the Earth Science and Environment Science Classrooms. Of particular interest are interactive CD-ROMs on the Theory of Plate Tectonics, Plate Tectonics and How the Earth Works, the Dynamic Earth, Plate Tectonics 3-D Puzzle, as well as Hands-On Mineral Identification and the Wonder of Rocks and Minerals, among others. They provide online ordering. To receive a 15% discount for teachers who visit the GSA website, contact Tasa Graphic Arts to receive a special web address and discount code.
www.tasagraphicarts.com, e-mail: info@tasagraphicarts.com, phone: 1-800-293-2725 or (505) 758-5535.
This Dynamic Earth – Read about plate tectonics and continental drift, the development of the theory, and unanswered questions.
pubs.usgs.gov/publications/text/dynamic.htm
Transforming California is a PowerPoint presentation of digital images exploring the landforms found along the San Andreas Fault. Designed for classroom use, Transforming California has a complementing narrative for each slide.
http://www.priweb.org/ed/earthtrips/transforming_ca_home.htm

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books & Maps
Earth Revealed – Continuously aired on PBS, this video series is for high school and undergraduate students. 5. The Birth of a Theory – In the 1960s, earth scientists developed the theory of plate tectonics. This program traces the development of plate tectonics, beginning with the contributions and methods of geologist Alfred Wegener. Sea-floor spreading, continental drift, paleomagnetism, and the primordial supercontinent Pangaea are some of the topics covered. 6. Plate Dynamics – This program examines the movement and interaction of tectonic plates, which account for a vast array of geologic formations and phenomena – from California’s San Andreas Fault to the Rift Valley of eastern Africa. The program covers convergent boundaries, subduction, hotspots, and the debate over what drives plate motion. 10. Geologic Time – To illustrate the immensity of geologic time, the entire span of Earth’s existence is compressed down to a year. The timeline of major geologic events is superimposed onto the year for a condensed view of Earth’s evolution. A relationship between this timeline and that of life on Earth is established, with fossils and radiocarbon dating playing a major role in the discovery. Annenberg/CPB Resources. Site has current broadcast dates and info on how to purchase videos, textbook, study guide, and teacher guide.
http://www.learner.org/resources/resource.html
The Living Planet – from the series Planet Earth, narrated by Richard Kiley ($13.29 for CD; 403 minutes). This entire series of videos sets out to explore our world in a different way. Examine such diverse topics as the effect of termites on global warming and the search for Nemesis, the hypothesized mystery planetoid that may be responsible for the demise of the dinosaurs. Includes seven parts narrated by Richard Kiley: “The Living Machine,” “The Blue Planet,” “The Climate Puzzle,” “Tales From Other Worlds,” “The Solar Sea,” “Gifts From the Earth,” and “The Fate of the Earth.”
Available from most science video catalogs, or order from www.cduniverse.com for only $13.29 for the CD at press time ($78.49 for the VHS box set).
NOVA episode “Magnetic Storm” – A great illustration of how the magnetic field works, what its “function” is, and the changes that take place within it. Can be purchased at:
www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/magnetic/. There are also several activities and print resources available at the NOVA website.
The Southern Appalachians: A Changing World – by Anne Tubiolo and Sandra Clark in cooperation with the National Park Service. 25-minute VHS. The video describes the Southern Appalachian Mountains and how the geologic events that took place millions of years ago influence the landscape, climate, soils and living things there today. The kit includes a teacher’s guide, also available at: http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/so_app/. The educational kit is $15 plus $5 shipping and handling per order, and may be ordered from: USGS Informational Services, Box 25286, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225, Tel: 888-ASK-USGS; Fax: 303-202-4693. A companion brochure, Birth of the Mountains, by Sandra Clark, is available free of charge at the above address, or online.
http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/birth/
Treasures of Neptune: Klondike on the Ocean Floor – ($149.00; 26 min). Looks at the relationship between plate tectonics and marine mineral deposits; shows how the ocean floor is being mapped and looks at recovery systems for marine resources including underwater scoops and shovels and giant “vacuum cleaners”.
Order from Films for the Humanities & Sciences, P.O. Box 2053; Princeton, N. J. 08543-2053; phone 1-800-257-5126.

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books & Maps

This Dynamic Planet  –  The USGS – Smithsonian map includes vectors indicating the rate of plate movement around the world.  It is a printed map for sale by the USGS (1 888 ASK USGS) and also an online web-GIS mapping application, on: http://mineralsciences.si.edu/tdpmap/

The Teacher-Friendly Guide to the Geology of the Northeastern U.S. by Jane Ansley, 2000. Written as a teacher preparation and information resource, this guide provides teachers with background on the regional geology of the Northeast. Ties in national science education standards and inquiry-based teaching. Contains corresponding student activities for each topic. Designed for middle and high school level science teachers but applicable to any level. Paleontological Research Institution Publications, 1259 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850; (www.priweb.org), $25.

Elementary

Rocks & Minerals

Lesson Plans

Sugar Cube Karst – Here’s a very simple (and fairly simplistic) model of karst formations for younger kids. The purpose of this activity is to explore the way water moves through a porous, soluble substance and to observe the development of pits and channels as the substance dissolves in water.

Rock Cycle Lab – A fun, hand-on rock cycle lab using very basic materials to help students understand the processes that form rocks.

Lesson Plan Links

A Paste with a Taste – Mining-oriented activity, kids make their own toothpaste!
minerals.state.nv.us/forms/educ/apastewithataste.pdf
Rock Hounds Lesson Plan – By using the resources on this web-based activity, students will gain an understanding of the rock cycle including how sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks form. Need Internet access, a web browser such as Netscape or Internet Explorer, e-mail access and materials that are listed under the activity collections.
www.fi.edu/fellows/payton/rocks/lesson.htm
Women in Mining – This Web site contains mineral resources for teachers, activities, games, and other links.
www.womeninmining.org

Elementary

Rocks & Minerals

Additional Resources

Rocks and Images – is an introduction to rock collecting. Read about the 3 kinds of rocks — igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic — and the Earth processes that formed them. Find out how to start a rock collection, where to find rocks, and the equipment you’ll need. (USGS)
pubs.usgs.gov/gip/collect1/collectgip.html
Exploring Earth – Interactive rock cycle:
www.classzone.com
A Teacher’s links and lesson plans on rocks:
www.suelebeau.com/rocks.htm
Mineralogical Society of America’s kids page:
www.minsocam.org/MSA/K12/K_12.html
Spaceman – Higher level, the specimens are listed alphabetically and by class. They also list the most distinguishing trait and the uses of each mineral plus some online quizes (adults).
www.spaceman.ca/mineral/
Fossweb: Earth Materials – Fun site with great rock and mineral data and a game using Mohs Drill and the Castle of Doom
www.fossweb.com/modules3-6/EarthMaterials/
Minerals In Sports, USGS – fire up athletes with the relevance of minerals to their craft. Find how minerals play a part in baseball, golf, weightlifting, tennis, pogo sticks and more.
http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/general_interest/
Coal–A Complex Natural Resource, USGS – discusses the origin, composition, and production of coal in the U.S. as well as the Public Health aspects of coal.
http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/c1143/
Science Spot – Links to Rocks and Mineral Links
www.sciencespot.net/Pages/kdzethsci3.html
ThinkQuest site on rocks and minerals – Excellent, just pull down the index and “go”. Grades 3-12.
library.thinkquest.org/J002289/
Visit the Dragon’s Cave and search for minerals – Educational fun for children.
www.minersoc.org/pages/education/dragons_cave/entercave.html
Rock Hounds (sponsored by the Franklin Institute) – This teacher-produced site is an excellent combination of learning through the net and in your own community. There are interactive learning experiences and suggested outdoor learning activities. This site is recommended for teachers of grades K-6.
www.fi.edu/fellows/payton/rocks/index2.html
Become a Rock Detective – Teaching collections of rock, fossil and mineral samples with hands-on activities called “Mysteries for Detectives” (K-adult) to solve. Buy or rent.
www.rockdetective.org

Intermediate

Rocks, Minerals, & Mining

Lesson Plans

Edible Rocks – MeteoritesThis lesson has been designed as a comfortable introduction to describing meteorites. It helps students become better observers by making a connection between the familiar (candy bars) and the unfamiliar (meteorites). Edible “rocks” are used in a scientific context, showing students the importance of observation, teamwork and communication skills. (Similar to “IF YOU BIT A ROCK.” but with meteorites, not earth rocks.)

Fast CrystallizationA fun and simple activity in which your students will watch four different salt crystals form. They will observe, record, and answer questions about the crystallization.

If You Bit a Rock (2.5MB PDF) – To observe and describe physical characteristics of a familiar model (candy bars) and apply to the unfamiliar (rocks). This is also an excellent activity to introduce geological terminology used in describing rocks.

Real Fake RocksParticipants quickly become engaged in trying to make a rock look real, and the work of creating an eye-fooling rock leads almost seamlessly to an interest in understanding the geologic significance of rock attributes such as color, pattern, texture and form. The rock-building process sharpens participant’s powers of observation and nudges them to compare their observations against a range of interpretations.

Rock Cycle Lab – A fun, hands-on rock cycle lab using everyday materials to help students understand the processes that form rocks.

Sugar Cube KarstHere’s a very simple (and fairly simplistic) model of karst formations for younger kids. The purpose of this activity is to explore the way water moves through a porous, soluble substance and to observe the development of pits and channels as the substance dissolves in water.

Towel GeologyTo demonstrate a wide range of geologic principles and processes using GeoArt, which uses artistic approaches to promote critical thinking about geology and geologic processes.

Toothpaste with a TwistAllows students to produce a “marketable product” used by most people every day that is made with minerals.

What Materials Are In My Car?Fun activity to help students realize how much we depend on mining to build a car.

Lesson Plan Links

Study of the Earth – Everything is made of something. From the MII, this unit provides fun activities and information in a printable PDF file.
www.mii.org/pdfs/study/StudyoftheEarth.pdf
Rocks & Minerals Activities – Selected labs and activities.
http://earth2class.org/curr_units/
Rock and Mineral Vocab Review – Rock and Mineral Hangman.
www.eram.k12.ny.us/education/components/docmgr/default.php?sectiondetailid=30712
Landforms – Students learn how water and erosion affect the landscape, research a specific landform, and create a visual display of landforms.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/landforms/
Volcanoes – Classic plan to make a volcano in the classroom.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/understanding/
Women in Mining – This Web site contains mineral resources for teachers, activities, games, and other links.
www.womeninmining.org
Cookie Mining – Always a fun activity that promotes knowledge of mining.
minerals.state.nv.us/forms/educ/ConstructMatsUsedforKitchen.pdf
Cupcake Mining – Cooking prep time for teacher, but shows nice model of cross section.
minerals.state.nv.us/forms/educ/Cupcake.pdf
Edible Geology – Fun demonstration of how layers of rocks form and erode.
minerals.state.nv.us/forms/educ/EdibleGeology.pdf
Rock Hounds Lesson Plan – By using the resources on this web-based activity, students will gain an understanding of the rock cycle including how sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks form. Need Internet access, a web browser such as Netscape or Internet Explorer, e-mail access and materials that are listed under the activity collections.
www.fi.edu/fellows/payton/rocks/lesson.htm
Rock Cycle – NY Regents study guide has great info on the rock cycle, with quizzes.
regentsprep.org/Regents/earthsci/rockcycle.htm
Mixing it Up – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, Feb 2001 poster back. In this activity students examine the composition of soil and make their own soil mixtures to understand the process of soil formation and how soils contribute to plant growth.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/mojave/mojaveposterback2.html
A Golden Opportunity for Science – Science & Children, Feb. 1993, 25 – 32. Gold mining and gold’s history, allure, and unique physical and chemical qualities explored, includes classroom activities and poster.
www.blm.gov/education/going_4_the_gold/gold_poster.html

Intermediate

Rocks & Minerals

Additional Resources

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books
Sand – This web site is a place where you can learn about sand, see a variety of different kinds of sand, and look at sands from different places around the world.
www.paccd.cc.ca.us/SAND/SANDHP.htm
Rocks and Images – is an introduction to rock collecting. Read about the 3 kinds of rocks — igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic — and the Earth processes that formed them. Find out how to start a rock collection, where to find rocks, and the equipment you’ll need. (USGS)
pubs.usgs.gov/gip/collect1/collectgip.html
Exploring Earth – Interactive rock cycle:
www.classzone.com
A Teacher’s links and lesson plans on rocks:
www.suelebeau.com/rocks.htm
Mineralogical Society of America’s kids page:
www.minsocam.org/MSA/K12/K_12.html
Spaceman – Higher level, the specimens are listed alphabetically and by class. They also list the most distinguishing trait and the uses of each mineral plus some online quizes (adults).
www.spaceman.ca/mineral/
Fossweb: Earth Materials – Fun site with great rock and mineral data and a game using Mohs Drill and the Castle of Doom
www.fossweb.com/modules3-6/EarthMaterials/
Minerals In Sports, USGS – fire up athletes with the relevance of minerals to their craft. Find how minerals play a part in baseball, golf, weightlifting, tennis, pogo sticks and more.
http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/general_interest/
Coal–A Complex Natural Resource, USGS – discusses the origin, composition, and production of coal in the U.S. as well as the Public Health aspects of coal.
http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/c1143/
Science Spot – Links to Rocks and Mineral Links
www.sciencespot.net/Pages/kdzethsci3.html
Tasa Graphic Arts Company – has produced state of the art multimedia products for use in the Earth Science and Environment Science Classrooms. Of particular interest are interactive CD-ROMs on Hands-On Mineral Identification, the Wonder of Rocks and Minerals, and the Study of Minerals. They provide online ordering. To receive a 15% discount for teachers who visit the GSA website, contact Tasa Graphic Arts to receive a special web address and discount code.
www.tasagraphicarts.com, e-mail: info@tasagraphicarts.com, phone: 1-800-293-2725 or (505) 758-5535.
How Rocks and Minerals are Formed –
http://www.fi.edu/fellows/fellow4/nov98/projects/formed.html
Mineral Information Institute – This website has information for teachers to teach students about our natural resources, where they come from, and their everyday use.
www.mii.org
Awesome ThinkQuest site on rocks and minerals – Just pull down the index and “go”
library.thinkquest.org/J002289/
Another ThinkQuest Junior site – this time on “A Wonderful World of Minerals”
library.thinkquest.org/J002744/adlm.html
All about quartz –
rockhoundingar.com/quartz.html
Mineralogy 4 Kids Rockin’ Internet Site – “The BEST Place to Learn about Rocks and Minerals”.
www.minsocam.org/MSA/K12/K_12.html
“Rocks and Minerals” slide show –
volcano.und.nodak.edu/vwdocs/vwlessons/lessons/Slideshow/Slideindex.html
Some other rock cycle sites:
www.moorlandschool.co.uk/earth/
www.minsocam.org/MSA/K12/rkcycle/rkcycleindex.html
www.science.ubc.ca/~geol202/rock_cycle/rockcycle.html
www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/msese/earthsysflr/rock.html
www.bbc.co.uk/education/rocks/rockcycle.shtml
pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/office/ganderson/es10/lectures/lecture09/lecture09.html
Learn about mine safety –
www.msha.gov/KIDS/KIDSHP.HTM
How to Identify Meteorites –
www.meteoritebroker.com/identify.htm
About Rocks and Minerals from a large home schooling site:
www.gomilpitas.com/homeschooling/explore/rocks.htm
Canadian Rockhound Geologic Magazine – Junior Rock Hound site has good rock and mineral info.
www.canadianrockhound.com/junior/minerals.html
Become a Rock Detective – Teaching collections of rock, fossil and mineral samples with hands-on activities called “Mysteries for Detectives” (K-adult) to solve. Buy or rent.
www.rockdetective.org

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books
Rockfinders: Learn About Rocks and Minerals – Learn all about rocks and minerals – from what they are to how they are formed. Max Orbit introduces kids to the fascinating world of rocks, minerals and fossils and offers helpful tips about where and how to hunt for rocks and fossils. Learn how to make paint form ground-up rocks, soap and water, or create a modern day fossil to discover how ancient fossils were formed and preserved. 30 minutes. Ages 8 and up. $14.95.
www.thinkeroo.com

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books

The Teacher-Friendly Guide to the Geology of the Northeastern U.S., by Jane Ansley, 2000. Written as a teacher preparation and information resource, this guide provides teachers with background on the regional geology of the Northeast. Ties in national science education standards and inquiry-based teaching. Contains corresponding student activities for each topic. Designed for middle and high school level science teachers but applicable to any level. Paleontological Research Institution Publications, 1259 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850; (www.priweb.org), $25.

The Big Rock, by Hiscock, Bruce. Grades 4-7. Looks at how a granite rock near the author’s house reveals information about Earth history. Paperback: ISBN 0689829582, Hardcover: ISBN 0689314027.

Caves, by Morris, Neil. Grades 4-7. All about the creation of caves and the animals (including humans) and plants that live(d) in them. Paperback: ISBN 0865058423, Hardcover: ISBN 0817243461.

Crystal & Gem, by Symes, R.F. and others. Grades 4-7. Terrific photos and information on formation and uses of crystals and gem stones. Hardcover: ISBN 0679807810.

Earth, by Grimshaw, Caroline. Grades 4-7. Deals with basic geoscience questions such as the origin of Earth and geological/biological changes through time. Paperback: ISBN 0716613050, Hardcover: ISBN 1568474539.

Geology Crafts for Kids: 50 Nifty Projects to Explore the Marvels of Planet Earth, by Anderson, Alan and others. Grades 4-7. General earth science activities explore subjects such as volcanoes, fossils, rocks & minerals, and erosion. Paperback: ISBN 0806981571, Hardcover: ISBN 0806981563.

A Look at Rocks: From Coal to Kimberlite, by Kittinger, Jo S. Grades 4-7. Describes the formation, appearance, and types of rocks. Also discusses the changes rocks undergo, and how to start a rock collection. Paperback: ISBN 053115887X, Hardcopy: ISBN 0531203107.

Rocks and Minerals, by Symes, R.F. and Colin Keates. Grades 4-7. Full color pictures and interesting text about the formation and uses of rocks and minerals. Hardcover: ISBN 0394896211.

Stone Wall Secrets, by Thorson, Kristine, Robert Thorson, and Gustav Moore. Grades 4-7. A farmer shares the geological history of the stones in a stone wall around the family’s property with his grandson. Hardcover: ISBN 0884481956.

Volcano & Earthquake, by Van Rose, Susanna. Grades 4-7. Discusses where and how earthquakes and volcanoes occur, prediction, and human interaction with these natural phenomena. Hardcover: ISBN 0679816852.

Volcano: The Eruption & Healing of Mount St. Helens, by Lauber, Patricia. Grades 4-7. Beautiful photographs and information about the eruption and aftermath of Mount St. Helens. Paperback: ISBN 0689716796.

Secondary

Rocks, Minerals, & Mining

Lesson Plans

Building Stones of the U.S.By examining the NIST Stone wall via the Internet, students will determine the weathering rate of various rocks in the mid-Atlantic region. They will then pick a rock to use in building their “dream house” and justify their choice.

If You Bit a Rock (2.5MB PDF) – To observe and describe physical characteristics of a familiar model (candy bars) and apply to the unfamiliar (rocks). This is also an excellent activity to introduce geological terminology used in describing rocks.

What Materials are in My Car?Fun activity to help students realize how much we depend on mining to build a car.

Edible Rocks – MeteoritesThis lesson has been designed as a comfortable introduction to describing meteorites. It helps students become better observers by making a connection between the familiar (candy bars) and the unfamiliar (meteorites). Edible “rocks” are used in a scientific context, showing students the importance of observation, teamwork and communication skills. (Same as “IF YOU BIT A ROCK.” but with meteorites, not earth rocks.)

Toothpaste with a TwistAllows students to produce a “marketable product used by most people ever day that is made with minerals.

Fast CrystallizationA fun and simple activity in which your students will watch four different salt crystals form. They will observe, record, and answer questions about the crystallization.

Lesson Plan Links

Rocks & Minerals Activities – Selected labs and activities.
http://earth2class.org/curr_units/
Rock and Mineral Vocab Review – Rock and Mineral Hangman.
www.eram.k12.ny.us/education/components/docmgr/default.php?sectiondetailid=30712
Three Dimensional Geology – Apply geological concepts to a real-life problem-solving situation and give students an appreciation of the three dimensional nature of rock strata using rocks, fossils, and simulated cores
geologyonline.museum.state.il.us/tools/lessons/12.5/lesson.pdf
Bird Seed Mining Activity – Students mine ‘valuable’ beads from birdseed tailings and calculate their costs, earnings, and reclamation. Fun!
minerals.state.nv.us/forms/educ/BirdSeedMining.pdf
Cookie Mining – Always a fun activity to use to promote knowledge of mining.
minerals.state.nv.us/forms/educ/ConstructMatsUsedforKitchen.pdf
Rock Hounds Lesson Plan – By using the resources on this web-based activity, students will gain an understanding of the rock cycle including how sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks form. Need Internet access, a web browser such as Netscape or Internet Explorer, e-mail access and materials that are listed under the activity collections.
www.fi.edu/fellows/payton/rocks/lesson.htm
Women in Mining – This Web site contains mineral resources for teachers, activities, games, and other links.
www.womeninmining.org

Secondary

Rocks & Minerals

Additional Resources

Internet Sites EducationalResources Videos Books
Sand – This web site is a place where you can learn about sand, see a variety of different kinds of sand, and look at sands from different places around the world.
www.paccd.cc.ca.us/SAND/SANDHP.htm
Rocks and Images – is an introduction to rock collecting. Read about the 3 kinds of rocks — igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic — and the Earth processes that formed them. Find out how to start a rock collection, where to find rocks, and the equipment you’ll need. (USGS)
pubs.usgs.gov/gip/collect1/collectgip.html
A Tapestry of Time & Terrain: Geology of the United States: Excellent Web site with the geologic map of the U.S. and highlights about certain features. You can also purchase the Tapestry of Time puzzle from the GSA Bookstore.
tapestry.usgs.gov/
Exploring Earth – Interactive rock cycle:
www.classzone.com
A Teacher’s links and lesson plans on rocks:
www.suelebeau.com/rocks.htm
Mineralogical Society of America’s kids page:
www.minsocam.org/MSA/K12/K_12.html
Spaceman – Higher level, the specimens are listed alphabetically and by class. They also list the most distinguishing trait and the uses of each mineral plus some online quizes (adults).
www.spaceman.ca/mineral/
Fossweb: Earth Materials – Fun site with great rock and mineral data and a game using Mohs Drill and the Castle of Doom
www.fossweb.com/modules3-6/EarthMaterials/
Minerals In Sports, USGS – fire up athletes with the relevance of minerals to their craft. Find how minerals play a part in baseball, golf, weightlifting, tennis, pogo sticks and more.
http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/general_interest/
Coal–A Complex Natural Resource, USGS – discusses the origin, composition, and production of coal in the U.S. as well as the Public Health aspects of coal.
http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/c1143/
Science Spot – Links to Rocks and Mineral Links
www.sciencespot.net/Pages/kdzethsci3.html
How Rocks and Minerals are Formed –
http://www.fi.edu/fellows/fellow4/nov98/projects/formed.html
Mineral Information Institute – This website has information for teachers to teach students about our natural resources, where they come from, and their everyday use.
www.mii.org
Awesome ThinkQuest site on rocks and minerals – Just pull down the index and “go”.
library.thinkquest.org/J002289/
Another ThinkQuest Junior site, this time on “A Wonderful World of Minerals”
library.thinkquest.org/J002744/adlm.html
All about quartz –
rockhoundingar.com/quartz.html
Mineralogy 4 Kids Rockin’ Internet Site – “The BEST Place to Learn about Rocks and Minerals”.
www.minsocam.org/MSA/K12/K_12.html
“Rocks and Minerals” slide show at –
volcano.und.nodak.edu/vwdocs/vwlessons/lessons/Slideshow/Slideindex.html
Some other rock cycle sites:
www.moorlandschool.co.uk/earth/
www.minsocam.org/MSA/K12/rkcycle/rkcycleindex.html
www.science.ubc.ca/~geol202/rock_cycle/rockcycle.html
www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/msese/earthsysflr/rock.html
www.bbc.co.uk/education/rocks/rockcycle.shtml
pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/office/ganderson/es10/lectures/lecture09/lecture09.html
Learn about mine safety –
www.msha.gov/KIDS/KIDSHP.HTM
How to Identify Meteorites –
www.meteoritebroker.com/identify.htm
About Rocks and Minerals from a large home schooling site:
www.gomilpitas.com/homeschooling/explore/rocks.htm
Canadian Rockhound Geologic Magazine – Junior Rock Hound site has good rock and mineral info.
www.canadianrockhound.com/junior/minerals.html
Become a Rock Detective – Teaching collections of rock, fossil and mineral samples with hands-on activities called “Mysteries for Detectives” (K-adult) to solve. Buy or rent.
www.rockdetective.org
Earthquake Shakes Kilauea Volcano – Article for grades 6 and up. Investigate Kilauea, one of Hawaii’s younger hotspot volcanoes; find out how hotspots form; and find out how Kilauea has been behaving-and misbehaving-lately. EarthBulletins include articles, images, photos, and video.
www.amnh.org/education/resources/rfl.php
Make a Quake Earthquake Simulator – Students and teachers can engineer a skyscraper to survive quakes or varying levels of intensity. From the Learning Channel.
tlc.discovery.com/convergence/quakes/interactives/makeaquake.html
The California Geotour – is an interactive index of Web page links to online California geologic field trip guides and geology related Web sites. The Web pages listed in the index are grouped by the California Geologic Provinces. Developed by the Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.
www.conservation.ca.gov/cgs/geotour

Internet Sites Educational Resources Videos Books
Tasa Graphic Arts Company – has produced state of the art multimedia products for use in the Earth Science and Environment Science Classrooms. Of particular interest are interactive CD-ROMs on Hands-On Mineral Identification, the Wonder of Rocks and Minerals, and the Study of Minerals. They provide online ordering. To receive a 15% discount for teachers who visit the GSA website, contact Tasa Graphic Arts to receive a special web address and discount code.
www.tasagraphicarts.com, e-mail: info@tasagraphicarts.com, phone: 1-800-293-2725 or (505) 758-5535

Internet Sites Educational Resources Videos Books
Poison in the Rockies – Amazing video about the threats to water quality in the Colorado Rockies (mining, acid precipitation and recreational development). Here is PBS’s updated “Nova” version of the award-winning DOWNWIND/DOWNSTREAM, documenting the serious threat to water quality, sub-alpine ecosystems and public health in the Colorado Rockies from mining operations, acid rain and urbanization. 56 minutes. Grade Level: Grades 9-12, College, Adult. US Release Date: 1990. ISBN: 1-56029-065-X.
http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/poison.html
Contact GSA’s Subaru Distinguished Earth Science Educator for a video worksheet.

Internet Sites Educational Resources Videos Books

The Teacher-Friendly Guide to the Geology of the Northeastern U.S., by Jane Ansley, 2000. Written as a teacher preparation and information resource, this guide provides teachers with background on the regional geology of the Northeast. Ties in national science education standards and inquiry-based teaching. Contains corresponding student activities for each topic. Designed for middle and high school level science teachers but applicable to any level. Paleontological Research Institution Publications, 1259 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850; (www.priweb.org), $25.

No Stone Unturned and under Earth, by Frank Press, Raymond Siever, and E.K. Peters. Grades 9-Adult. An unbeatable introductory text written by masters of both education and earth science. Paperback: ISBN 0716731339.

Glossary of Geology, by Julia A. Jackson. Grades 9-Adult. Is concrete a rock? What exactly is mineral hardness? Is quartzite a rock name, or a mineral? These are questions that can be easily answered with the Glossary of Geology. Hardcover: ISBN 0922152349.

Elementary

Space Science

Lesson Plan Links

Asteroid Watch: Fireball in the Sky – This CIESE collaborative project which asks students to determine the consequences of objects from space striking the earth by studying impact craters. The culmination of the project is to find actual asteroids and determine whether they are a threat or not. (Recommended Grade Levels 5-12 but all are invited to participate).
www.k12science.org/nasa2/
Auroras – Paintings in the Sky by Mish Denlinger. For middle school students. An introduction to auroras and the processes that create these mysterious lights.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/SegwayEd/abtauror.html
Best of the Solar System – by Maureen Kerr and Priscilla Strain. For elementary and middle school students. A student introduction to planetary research through images of solar system objects.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/SegwayEd/abtbest.html
Earth and Mars Modules for 2 – 6 grades. Interactive student activities geared towards planet exploration.
www-k12.atmos.washington.edu/k12/modules/
How Satellites See – by Chris Wilder. Intended for use by elementary school students and their teachers. This project compares and contrasts three NASA satellites: The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) . Students can compare physical parts and orbits of each satellite, will compare images about how each satellite “sees” the Universe. Students can also participate in hands-on experiments to begin to understand visible, infrared, and u.v. wavelengths.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/lessons/indiv/wilder/summary.html
Live from the Aurora (K-12) – This educator guide includes activities and lesson plans designed to challenge students into further investigating the dynamic nature of the Sun and its connection to the Earth.
sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/sunearthday/2003/educators_guide2003/index.html
NSTA – Astronomy with a Stick – Hands-on activities for upper elementary. Students explore daytime observations using a gnomon. They also model the Earth’s orientation to the Sun and how this affects seasonal activity.
www.nsta.org/awsday
NASA – “Drawing a Scale Model of the Universe” from NASA’s Space Place:
spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/educators/comet_orbits_cnsr.pdf#xml=http
NASA’s Deep Impact Mission has a module called Designing Craters in which students model impact cratering. The Deep Impact spacecraft which launched last month is scheduled to impact comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005.
deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/designing_craters/
Mars Mobiles (K-2) – This activity introduces students to the basic features of the Mars landscape. Students will compare the landscapes of Mars and Earth and create mobiles showcasing some of the features of the Martian landscape.
www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/01/gk2/marsmobiles.html
Martian Real Estate: A Good Investment? (3-5) – This lesson has students compare the landscapes of Mars and Earth and explore why the two planets are so different. They will conclude by writing letters convincing fictitious family friends that it is probably not a good idea to invest in Martian real estate.
www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/01/g35/marsreal.html
MESSENGER Program – Modules contain lessons on the Solar System and our place in space. All of the modules have lessons specifically geared to K-2, 3-4, 5-8, and 9-12 levels. They work well in cooperative groups.
btc.montana.edu/ceres/MESSENGER/teachers/Modules/MessEducat.htm#Exploring
Objects in the Sky – To observe and describe what the sky looks like at different times; to identify objects in the sky and recognize changes over time; to look for objects that are common to the daytime and nighttime sky.
www.sciencenetlinks.com/lessons.cfm?BenchmarkID=4&DocID=155
Oreo Moon Phases (K-4) – Use Oreo® cookies to illustrate moon phases.
http://analyzer.depaul.edu/paperplate/Oreo%20Moon%20Phases.htm
Our Very Own Star the Sun (K-4) – Downloadable Book (Adobe) – This easy-to-read coloring book is designed for students to learn about solar flares and sunspots and why scientists study the sun. Text is higher level, pictures very (too?) simple.Phases of the Moon – This site has loads of information about moon phases along with a way to retrieve information about what phase the moon was in over 100 years ago. A local teacher used this to have her students look up what phase the moon was in on the day of their birth. They loved it!
http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2005/materials/OurVeryOwnStarEng.pdf
Powers of Ten – Not really a lesson plan per se, but so powerful it has been included under lesson plans. Project to your class and students will be in awe of this exercise.
http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/
The Space Place – Lots of fun things to make and do from NASA, some teacher activities.
spaceplace.nasa.gov/
The Sun and the Earth (3-5) – The National Geography Standards recommend that students in grades three to five understand the relationship between the Earth and the Sun and how this relationship affects observable phenomena on Earth, such as the seasons. This activity will help students learn about these concepts and will reinforce their understanding by having them diagram the Earth and Sun during different seasons. Need internet access.
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/07/g35/seasons.html
The Sun Times – Global Temperature Project – Join schools from around the world as they try to figure out how their geographic location (i.e. where they live) affects their average daily temperature and hours of sunlight. Specifically, students will: * Measure the temperature and record the number of minutes of sunlight per day over a common week. Compare and contrast the results with classes from all over the world. Determine how proximity to the equator affects average daily temperature and hours of sunlight.
www.k12science.org/curriculum/tempproj2/
Third from the Sun – by Ronna Voorsanger. For elementary school students. Learn about observing earth from space and guess the locations pictured in Landsat images.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/SegwayEd/abthird.html
University of Hawai’i at Manoa – The Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology offers more than 25 hands-on science activities are provided in classroom-ready pages for both teachers and students for exploring Earth, the planets, geology, and space sciences.
www.spacegrant.hawaii.edu/class_acts/SolarSystemDoc.html
What Makes Day and Night – Eye on the Sky – Communicate astronomical reasons for day and night; establish the concept of the earth spinning on its axis; discover that the earth spins at a rate of once per day.
http://eyeonthesky.org/lessonplans/05sun_daynight.html

Elementary

Space Science

Additional Resources

The Moon – The Nine Planets – This site has very useful and comprehensive information about the planets. Here you will find information and links to other planet sites as well.
seds.lpl.arizona.edu/nineplanets/nineplanets/luna.html
The Inconstant Moon – This extremely useful site contains a calendar to see the phase of each day and to get information about the moon. Scroll down to the menu at the bottom of the main page and click on Atlas to be able to see pictures of the moon’s surface.
www.inconstantmoon.com/inconstant.htm
Lunar Eclipses for Beginners – This site has an explanation of why an eclipse occurs. Scroll down for information about when other eclipses will be happening. Scroll down to find pictures of lunar eclipses.
www.mreclipse.com/Special/LEprimer.html
Earth and Moon Viewer – This site allows you to explore the earth and moon, viewing each from different perspectives. Additional links to other sites.
www.fourmilab.ch/earthview/vplanet.html
Apollo 11 – 30th Anniversary – This is a Web site for the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. It has links to other NASA and non-NASA sites. Be sure to check out the galleries for great pictures. The timelines of Manned Apollo Missions and Lunar Exploration Chronology are really fascinating.
www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/ap11ann/timelines.htm
Moon Phases – This site has an interesting way of viewing the Moon. Change the POINT OF VIEW to BOTH and see the position of the Moon in its orbit around the Earth and the phase at the same time.
www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/java/MoonPhase.html
Moon Phase Claendar – This is a great calendar showing the current and future months with moon phases and the current phase of the moon. Be sure to click on the moon to see an animated progression of the phases. Neat!
www.shetline.com/java/moonphase/moonphase.html
NASA – Lunar Eclipse Page – This site has information about recent and upcoming eclipses. Be sure to check out the resources at the bottom of the page for information about solar eclipses.
sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/lunar.html
Keith’s Moon Page – Facts, Phases, Photos, and Folklore – There is quite a bit of information about the moon here. Enjoy!
home.hiwaay.net/~krcool/Astro/moon/
Virtual Reality Moon Phase Pictures – You can use this site to view the phase of the moon for any time and date from 1800 to 2199.
tycho.usno.navy.mil/vphase.html
Astronomy Picture of the Moon – This site shows you the moon contiunually cycling through its phases. Be sure to click on “Discover the Cosmos”. Each day a different image or photograph of the universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap010218.html
Bad Astronomy Misconceptions – Phil Plait, find a series of refutations of commonly held beliefs regarding astronomy, for example: “Appalled at Apollo: Uncovering the Moon-Landing Hoax” the infamous “You can only balance an egg on end during an Equinox” urban legend, and even “Flushed with Pride: the Coriolis Effect in Your Potty.”
www.badastronomy.com/bad/misc/
Classroom Planetarium – Stellarium is a free open source planetarium for your computer. It shows a realistic sky in 3D, just like what you see with the naked eye, binoculars or a telescope. It is being used in planetarium projectors. Just set your coordinates and go.
stellarium.sourceforge.net/
Size of Your World – Uses images to allow size comparisons of our solar system to distant stars. A real eye opener.
newsizeofourworld.ytmnd.com/
Star Count – A new project from NASA: Investigation: Do people everywhere see the same number of stars in the night sky? Why or why not?
www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/starcount/home/
The Moon – The Nine Planets: Excellent site with comprehensive information about the planets. Here you will find great information and links to other wonderful sites.
seds.lpl.arizona.edu/nineplanets/nineplanets/luna.html
Lunar Eclipses for Beginners – This site has a wealth of information. Great explanation of why an eclipse occurs. Scroll down for information about when other eclipses will be happening and for pictures of lunar eclipses.
www.mreclipse.com/Special/LEprimer.html
The Planetary Society – Earth Dial Project – Links to activities and useful tools In teaching about the sun and time:
www.planetary.org/mars/earthdial/references.html
Celesta – An extensive free download which students can use to research the planets, stars and other space topics. Also includes lesson plans.
www.celestiamotherlode.net/educational.html
Apollo 11 – 30th Anniversary – This is a Web site for the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Picture galleries, timelines of Manned Apollo Missions and Lunar Exploration Chronology and links to other NASA and non-NASA sites
www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/ap11ann/timelines.htm
Moon Phases – This site contains: 2 complete photographic maps of the moon, pictures of the moon and quizzes about the phases of the moon.
www.moon-phases.com/
Space Day – Learn about space day and what teachers and students can do for space day.
www.spaceday.com
Mars: The Red Planet – This globe of Mars is a mosaic of images from the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. It is centered on Valles Marineris, the “Grand Canyon” of Mars.
planetary.org/mars/mars.html
The Nine Planets – an overview of the history, mythology, and current scientific knowledge of each of the planets and moons in our solar system. Each page has text and images, some have sounds and movies, most provide references to additional related information.
seds.lpl.arizona.edu/nineplanets/nineplanets/nineplanets.html
Thursday’s Classroom – The aim of Thursday’s Classroom is to provide a lasting connection between NASA’s latest research and the classroom environment.
www.thursdaysclassroom.com/index_24aug00.htm
Mars Exploration Rover Mission Fun Zone – All the latest images and data, updated daily, from Spirit, which landed on Mars 1/4/04. Other Mars resources, games, activities, etc. From NASA.
marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/funzone_flash.html
The Exploratorium – A museum with space resources for teachers and students. This site also has updates on the Mars landing of the Spirit exploration rover.
www.exploratorium.edu
The Center for Mars Exploration – A Web page outlining NASA’s strategy for Mars exploration, including video clips from past missions.
cmex-www.arc.nasa.gov/CMEX/index.html
Mars City Alpha – Mars City Alpha is a site based simulation for grades 6-12. The year is 2043 and an international venture to Mars is in the initial planning stages, an exciting mission–to design and build the first Mars habitat. This science and mathematics based simulation emphasizes experiential learning with a focus on teamwork, de2 August, 2010rs City Alpha kit contains: Teacher’s Guide Mission Manuals for 5 student design teams, Mission Log tablet and additional resources, including the full color poster, “An Explorer’s Guide to Mars.” The kit can be ordered from Challenger Center, 1029 North Royal Street, Suite 300, Alexandria, VA 22314. (703) 683-9740. Cost is $85/kit plus $5.50 shipping. Mars City Alpha is copyrighted program produced by Challenger Center for Space Science Education.
One example can be found at: www.challenger.org/UtopiaMCA/Overview.html
Terraforming Mars – What would it take for humans to live on Mars? This article explores the possible use of greenhouse gases to create a warm, breathable environment on the red planet. Includes links to a NASA conference on Martian habitability.
www.firstscience.com/site/articles/terraform.asp
Colonizing Mars – Will Earthlings ever try to inhabit Mars? What would a human colony look like? This site imagines a Mars where humans are landing at a rate of 2,000 a week. Take a look at what some people think is the fate of Mars and then imagine one of your own.
www.marsproject.com/index.htm
Searchable Image Collections for space science that teacher can use:
1. Astronomical Image Library: www.syz.com/images/
2. Multiwavelength Milky Way: adc.gsfc.nasa.gov/mw/
3. Astronomy Picture of the Day: antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/
4. Skyview Virtual Observatory: skyview.gsfc.nasa.gov/
5. Solar Data Archive Center: umbra.nascom.nasa.gov/
6. Constellation photos. This site has a few bugs, but the photos make up for it: www.allthesky.com/
7. NCSA Astronomy Digital Image Library (this one is tough – more for research) imagelib.ncsa.uiuc.edu/imagelib
8. Astronomy Today www.astronomytoday.com/
Storms from the Sun (K-12) – This educational poster contains information about the Sun, coronal mass ejections and how they affect Earth. Very informative.
http://spacelink.nasa.gov/products/Storms.from.the.Sun.Poster/
Living with a Star (K-12) – This educator guide is designed to provide educators with a quick reference to an impressive amount of materials and resources that are useful for understanding the connections between the Sun and Earth.
spacelink.nasa.gov/products/Living.with.a.Star/
NASA Science News – All the latest space science news in an easy to read format. Great reading for a class studying science.
science.nasa.gov
NASA Educator Resource Center – Space Foundation – Order form for available teacher resources, including curriculum booklets, videos and posters. All materials are FREE and Public Domain. Items are available for a shipping and handling fee to cover costs, either fax or send in the request.
www.spacefoundation.org/education/erc/index.html
Windows to the Universe – A fun and different Web site about the Earth and Space sciences. Windows to the Universe is graphics intensive! Tons of space information, teacher resources, and kid stuff including quizzes and educational ‘games’. A great site to visit.
windows2universe.org
Adventures of Amelia the Pigeon (K-4) – a new interactive Web site from NASA. Has supporting lesson plans and hands-on activities to illustrate science concepts such as remote sensing, helping student to understand how scientists use satellite imagery to study Earth’s environmental changes. Also on this site is Echo the Bat, which helps students learn about light and the electromagnetic spectrum (grades 5-8).
imagers.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Intermediate

Space Science

Lesson Plans

Edible Rocks – NASA – Using candy bars, get students to observe and compare textures to those of meteorites. Introduces meteorite terminology and the importance of observational skills.

Space-Time DiscussionTeacher-led discussion that will help students understand starlight, how old it is, and how we learn things about the origins of the universe from it.

Lesson Plan Links

Astronomy – Selected Labs and Activities from Earth to Class.
http://earth2class.org/curr_units/astro%20labs.php
Earth’s Magnetic Field – is the focus of the POETRY website, which explores solar storms & how they affect us, space weather, & the Northern Lights. A 64-page workbook of hands-on activities examines Earth’s magnetosphere. Create a classroom magnetometer. Solve the space science problem of the week. (NASA)
image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/
Seeing the Invisible – offers a guide & workbook to help students discover that the sun emits light in wavelengths outside the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Activities allow students to view unique features of the Sun that are revealed only by certain spectral wavelengths of light. (NASA)
http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/class6-8.htm
Solar Storms & You – is a series of 6 workbooks on solar activity & sunspots, solar wind, magnetic storms, aurora, & satellite design (Grades 7-9). (NASA)
http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry//higley.html
Imagine the Universe – includes lesson plans on wavelengths & frequencies, sizes of stars, gamma-ray bursts, the binary number system, the probability of life elsewhere in the universe, analyzing images from digital satellite data, measuring periodic behavior, logarithmic plotting & classification of objects by their mathematical behavior, the origin of the elements & their identification in supernova remnants, & identifying elements using spectroscopy. (NASA)
http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/teachers/lesson_plans.html
Solar System Exploration – features lesson plans on electro-magnetism, energy, exploration, gravity, pioneers, landforms, life, light, math ratios, matter, measurement, modeling, origin, planet surfaces, rocks & minerals, the scientific method, & triangulation. Classroom & informal learning activities focus on meteorites, comets, the sun, planet change & constancy, the search for life in the solar system, & missions to outer planets. (NASA)
http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/educ/lessons.cfm
Sky Server – Index of teacher guides for SkyServer’s science projects.
http://skyserver.sdss.org/edr/en/proj/teachers/
Powers of Ten – Not really a lesson plan per se, but so powerful it has been included under lesson plans. Project to your class and students will be in awe of this exercise.
http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/
NASA – “Drawing a Scale Model of the Universe” from NASA’s Space Place:
spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/educators/comet_orbits_cnsr.pdf#xml=http
NASA’s Deep Impact Mission has a module called Designing Craters in which students model impact cratering. The Deep Impact spacecraft which launched last month is scheduled to impact comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005.
deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/designing_craters/
MESSENGER Program – Modules contain lessons on the Solar System and our place in space. All of the modules have lessons specifically geared to K-2, 3-4, 5-8, and 9-12 levels. They work well in cooperative groups.
btc.montana.edu/ceres/MESSENGER/teachers/Modules/MessEducat.htm#Exploring
University of Hawai’i at Manoa – The Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology offers more than 25 hands-on science activities are provided in classroom-ready pages for both teachers and students for exploring Earth, the planets, geology, and space sciences.
www.spacegrant.hawaii.edu/class_acts/SolarSystemDoc.html
Destination: Mars – Have you ever thought what it would be like if we lived in outer space? Think about what types of things you will need to survive in space. Will they be similar to what you need to survive here on earth or different?
Lesson plan: www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM392
Travel in the Solar System – This lesson affords students the opportunity to think about two aspects of the time required to complete space travel within the solar system.
illuminations.nctm.org/lessonplans/6-8/travel/index.html
Martian Microbes? – If there was life on Mars in the past, what would confirm that? How could ancient organisms have come into being? This page includes an activity that demonstrates how cell membranes might have formed, as well as links to other lesson plans and Webcasts about the search for life on Mars, articles about the search for water, and more.
www.exploratorium.edu/mars/teachers/microbes.html
Imagine Yourself on Mars – Exploring the Martian Environment. If you could stand on the surface of Mars, what would you experience? This activity demonstrates the effect of lower atmospheric pressure on water that might exist on Mars. There are also links to instructions on how to make a Martian calendar, how to figure your age and weight on Mars, a Webcast about the Martian environment, and more.
www.exploratorium.edu/mars/teachers/onmars.html
Rambling Red Rover – What tools are aboard the Mars Exploration Rover and what are they searching for? In this activity you can use photos taken by the Rover to make the same 3-D images scientists will use to study the planet’s surface. There are also links to information about the Rover’s other tools, instructions for making your own 3-D glasses, and more.
www.exploratorium.edu/mars/teachers/rover.html
Mars Millennium Project Home Page – a national education program in which students design a colony on Mars in the year 2030.
www.planetary.org/html/mmp/
Phases of the Moon – This site has loads of information about moon phases along with a way to retrieve information about what phase the moon was in over 100 years ago. A local teacher used this to have her students look up what phase the moon was in on the day of their birth. They loved it!
aa.usno.navy.mil/faq/docs/moon_phases.html
Is There Water on Mars? (9-12) – This educator guide has seven activities that can be done in the classroom that will help students deduce whether there is water on Mars.
spacelink.nasa.gov/products/Is.There.Water.on.Mars
Live from the Aurora (K-12) – This educator guide includes activities and lesson plans designed to challenge students into further investigating the dynamic nature of the Sun and its connection to the Earth.
sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/sunearthday/2003/educators_guide2003/index.html
Path to Mars – A simple plan from the Discovery School comparing Earth and Mars.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/thepathtomars/
The Martian Sun-Times – by Florence Vaughan and Jeff Benson. Intended for junior high school students and their teachers. Student weather reporters investigate seasons, temperatures and clouds on Mars and compare them to Earth.
www.ucls.uchicago.edu/MartianSunTimes/
Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) Satellite Data Flow Demonstration – by Marlene Wilson and Dennis Biroscak. Intended for use by 4th-12th grade students who have ball-throwing and ball-catching skills. This is a hands-on demonstration of the communication path between the EUVE satellite and a scientist on Earth.
www.exploratorium.edu/learning_studio/auroras/
Auroras: Paintings in the Sky – by Mish Denlinger. Intended for 6th-12th graders An introduction to auroras and the processes that create these mysterious lights.
www.exploratorium.edu/learning_studio/auroras/
Take a Spin Through the Solar System – Original concept and authoring by Kevin McCarron and Ginger Privat with additional authoring by Nellie Levine (aka N. Levandovsky.) Intended for middle and high school students and their teachers. Have you noticed how many things around you rotate? In this unit we are going to measure and investigate rotation rates of different planets, and even the Sun. We will base our research on the images and textual information found on the Internet.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/lessons/indiv/spin/summary.html
Find That Planet! – by Alan Gould. For middle and high school students. Make a horizon planetarium to find the locations of planets in the sky. High School students can use position data to make a sky map.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/SegwayEd/abtfindp.html
Eyes in the Sky – by Bryan Yager. Intended for 6-8 graders. This lesson plan shows how middle school students who are taking industrial technology classes use technology to learn about orbiting spacecraft designed to study astronomical objects.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/lessons/indiv/bryan/summary.html
Space Explorers – This is a private firm that provides authentic experiences for students at a cost. The site does offer a free lesson on the scale of the solar system that would be an excellent activity for grades 6-9.
www.space-explorers.com
Exploring Planets in the Classroom – More than 25 hands-on activities from the Hawaii Space Grant Consortium are provided in classroom-ready pages for both teachers and students for exploring Earth, the planets, geology, and space sciences.
www.spacegrant.hawaii.edu/class_acts/index.html
Space Science Activities, Hawaiian Style – mostly demonstrations, some lesson plans.
www.spacegrant.hawaii.edu/hi-nsta2001.html
Measuring Stellar Temperatures: How Hot Is That Star? – by Jim Meunier and Jim Lehman. For middle school students. This multi-part module uses the Sun as a first example to illustrate how astronomers measure temperature using a star’s spectrum.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/SegwayEd/abtstellar.html
Classifying Galaxies – by George and Jane Hastings. For middle school students. Learn to identify and classify galaxies the way astronomers do. Then go to the Hubble Space Telescope Institute for more advanced study. Need internet access for all.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/SegwayEd/abtgalaxy.html
Life on Mars: Science Fact or Science Fiction? (Grades to 6-8, 9-12) – Investigating and Evaluating the Possibility of Life on Other Planets. In this lesson, students investigate the basic requirements needed for human survival and contemplate the possibility of sustaining life on other planets, as is being researched by the recently-launch20 April, 2010 activity, students work in small groups to create a chart and a graph comparing statistics of the nine planets in the solar system and evaluating the elements that prevent life from flourishing on other planets.
www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/19990105tuesday.html
A Whole New World (Grades to 6-8, 9-12) – Investigating Direct Evidence of an Extrasolar Planet and the Sustenance of Life on Different Worlds. In this lesson, students explore the significance of direct scientific evidence of an extrasolar planet, focusing on the relationship of this new discovery to the notion of survival of living things on other planets. S tudents work in small groups to investigate statistics regarding the nine planets in the solar system and participate in a ‘scientific conference’ to examine the elements that allow or prevent life from flourishing on other planets. Students then explor e the available information about the extrasolar planet and assess the importance of this astronomical find.
www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/19991116tuesday.html
Look on the Bright Side! (Grades to 6-8, 9-12) – Making Models of Solar Eclipses and Building Pinhole Projectors. In this lesson, students learn about solar eclipses by participating in a number of hands-on activities. In class, students work in teams using tennis balls, grapes and flashlights to model partial and total solar ecli pses. At home, students build pinhole projectors and experiment with how they work.
www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/19990810tuesday.html
The Space Place – Lots of fun things to make and do from NASA, some teacher activities.
spaceplace.nasa.gov/
Graphing Sunspot Cycles – The student will be able to determine existing patterns in sunspot numbers. The student will be able to plot sunspot numbers to determine these relationships. The student will be able to use these relationships to determine the approximate number of sunspots for a year in the near future.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/suncycle_edu.html
Lunar Lollipops – After completing this activity students should understand that the observed phase of the Moon is determined by the Moon’s position relative to the Earth and Sun.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/lunar_edu.html
Please Ex-Planet! – This activity lets students research a particular planet and then share their findings with the rest of the students in their class. Need internet access.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/explanet_edu.html
The Magnetometer – Students will build an instrument capable of detecting a magnetic field and magnetic polarity.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/magnetometer_edu.html
Plotting Sunspot Activity – Students will learn how to graph sunspots, also called active regions (AR’s), on the Sun using a solar graph. They then can make generalizations about where sunspots usually occur on the Sun.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/sunspotplot_edu.html
Charting the Planets – NASA Educational Brief – Learning to use a chart of data can be helpful in several ways. First, a chart can provide an orderly list of individual facts. A second way to use a chart is to look for trends and patterns in the data. Learn about these in this lesson.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/charting_the_planets.html
Galileo Curriculum Module – The Galileo spacecraft, after a 6-year journey, arrived at Jupiter in December, 1995, and began a tour of the planet and its system of moons. “Let us help you and your students understand and appreciate WHY we’re going and WHAT we hope to learn there.”
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/galileo/1.html
Solar System Puzzle Kit – Comprehensive activity in which students make an eight cube version of the solar system.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/puzzle_kit/pk_cover.html
Space Based Astronomy Teacher’s Guide – Activities, experiments, and readings dealing with NASA’s space based astronomy.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/space_astronomy/cover.html
The Sun Times – Global Temperature Project – Join schools from around the world as they try to figure out how their geographic location (i.e. where they live) affects their average daily temperature and hours of sunlight. Specifically, students will: * Measure the temperature and record the number of minutes of sunlight per day over a common week. Compare and contrast the results with classes from all over the world. Determine how proximity to the equator affects average daily temperature and hours of sunlight.
www.k12science.org/curriculum/tempproj2/
Asteroid Watch: Fireball in the Sky – This CIESE collaborative project which asks students to determine the consequences of objects from space striking the earth by studying impact craters. The culmination of the project is to find actual asteroids and determine whether they are a threat or not. (Recommended Grade Levels 5-12 but all are invited to participate).
www.k12science.org/nasa2/

Intermediate

Space Science

Additional Resources

Interactive Internet Sites Books
Adventures of Amelia the Pigeon (K-4) – a new interactive Web site from NASA. Has supporting lesson plans and hands-on activities to illustrate science concepts such as remote sensing, helping student to understand how scientists use satellite imagery to study Earth’s environmental changes. Also on this site is Echo the Bat, which helps students learn about light and the electromagnetic spectrum (grades 5-8).
imagers.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Apollo 11 – 30th Anniversary – This is a Web site for the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. It has links to other NASA and non-NASA sites. Be sure to check out the galleries for great pictures. The timelines of Manned Apollo Missions and Lunar Exploration Chronology are really fascinating.
www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/ap11ann/timelines.htm
Astronomy Picture of the Moon – This site shows you the moon contiunually cycling through its phases. Be sure to click on “Discover the Cosmos”. Each day a different image or photograph of the universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap010218.html
Astronomy Diagrams – For introductory astronomy classes.
astro.wsu.edu/worthey/astro/html/lec-celestial-sph.html
Bad Astronomy Misconceptions – Phil Plait, find a series of refutations of commonly held beliefs regarding astronomy, for example: “Appalled at Apollo: Uncovering the Moon-Landing Hoax” the infamous “You can only balance an egg on end during an Equinox” urban legend, and even “Flushed with Pride: the Coriolis Effect in Your Potty.”
www.badastronomy.com/bad/misc/
Celesta – An extensive free download which students can use to research the planets, stars and other space topics. Also includes lesson plans.
www.celestiamotherlode.net/educational.html
The Center for Mars Exploration – A Web page outlining NASA’s strategy for Mars exploration, including video clips from past missions.
cmex-www.arc.nasa.gov/CMEX/index.html
Classroom Planetarium – Stellarium is a free open source planetarium for your computer. It shows a realistic sky in 3D, just like what you see with the naked eye, binoculars or a telescope. It is being used in planetarium projectors. Just set your coordinates and go.
stellarium.sourceforge.net/
Colonizing Mars – Will Earthlings ever try to inhabit Mars? What would a human colony look like? This site imagines a Mars where humans are landing at a rate of 2,000 a week. Take a look at what some people think is the fate of Mars and then imagine one of your own.
www.marsproject.com/index.htm
Earth and Moon Viewer – This site allows you to explore the earth and moon, viewing each from different perspectives. Additional links to other sites.
www.fourmilab.ch/earthview/vplanet.html
Earth Science Internet Campus – from EOA Scientific Systems. Find a series of clever, interactive, shockwave animations, ranging in size from 36 K to 2000 K, that can be used to introduce the following concepts:
1. Earth: Earthquakes, Seismic Waves and Activity, Earthquake Epicenter; Tectonic Plates and Tectonic Mapping; Glaciers; Hydrological Cycle;
2. Ocean: Sea Pressure and Depth; Secchi Disk; Animal Adaptations – Animals Which Camouflage; Fill the Earth with Oceans (sea level change);
3. Atmosphere: Variations of Tropospheric Thickness; Temperature of the Atmosphere; Wind Direction – The Jet Stream / Jet Stream Map; The Coriolis Effect; Sun’s Radiation on Earth – Angle of Incidence/solar altitude; Weather Education, Facts and Trivia; Lightning Game;
4. Space: The Solar System Planets; Satellite Remote Sensing / Taking Satellite Pictures;
5. Science: Periodic Table of Elements; Weight Mass Volume Density Gravity; Characteristics of All Waves.
www.eoascientific.com/prototype/newcampus/campus.html and then look for “interactive exercises” under the “earth,” “ocean,” “atmosphere,” “space,” and “science” links. Audience: Middle School and Up. Need a classroom of powerful computers, will have you download Shockwave.
Earth-Sun Relationships – Lots of interesting information, no real lesson plans:
personal.cmich.edu/~franc1m/earthsun.htm
Earth vs. Mars: The Two Planets Weigh In – from Space.com find a concise comparison of the two planets on almost two dozen variables including weather, caves, gravity, cosmic radiation.
www.space.com/scienceastronomy/mars_tape_030819.html
The Exploratorium – A museum with space resources for teachers and students. This site also has updates on the Mars landing of the Spirit exploration rover.
www.exploratorium.edu
Free Astronomy Lessons – Dr. Jamie Love – Principles of Astronomy. This course is a healthy mix of observational and academic (scientific) astronomy so you will learn identification and a great deal about stars and the universe. This is a low math (no math?) astronomy course but it covers a great deal of astronomy.
www.synapses.co.uk/astro/index.html
Genesis Education and Public Outreach –
genesismission.jpl.nasa.gov
How to Identify Meteorites –
www.meteoritebroker.com/identify.htm
The Inconstant Moon – This extremely useful site contains a calendar to see the phase of each day and to get information about the moon. Scroll down to the menu at the bottom of the main page and click on Atlas to be able to see pictures of the moon’s surface.
www.inconstantmoon.com/inconstant.htm
Interplanetary Distances – Information on how to get a lesson plan on planetary distances.
ofcn.org/cyber.serv/academy/ace/sci/cecsci/cecsci007.html
Keith’s Moon Page – Facts, Phases, Photos, and Folklore – There is quite a bit of information about the moon here. Enjoy!
home.hiwaay.net/~krcool/Astro/moon/
Living with a Star (K-12) – This educator guide is designed to provide educators with a quick reference to an impressive amount of materials and resources that are useful for understanding the connections between the Sun and Earth.
spacelink.nasa.gov/products/Living.with.a.Star/
Lunar Eclipses for Beginners – This site has an explanation of why an eclipse occurs. Scroll down for information about when other eclipses will be happening. Scroll down to find pictures of lunar eclipses.
www.mreclipse.com/Special/LEprimer.html
Mars City Alpha – Mars City Alpha is a site based simulation for grades 6-12. The year is 2043 and an international venture to Mars is in the initial planning stages, an exciting mission–to design and build the first Mars habitat. This science and mathematics based simulation emphasizes experiential learning with a focus on teamwork, decision-making and creative and critical problem solving. The Mars City Alpha kit contains: Teacher’s Guide Mission Manuals for 5 student design teams, Mission Log tablet and additional resources, including the full color poster, “An Explorer’s Guide to Mars.” The kit can be ordered from Challenger Center, 1029 North Royal Street, Suite 300, Alexandria, VA 22314. (703) 683-9740. Cost is $85/kit plus $5.50 shipping. Mars City Alpha is copyrighted program produced by Challenger Center for Space Science Education.
One example can be found at: www.challenger.org/UtopiaMCA/Overview.html
Mars Exploration Rover Mission Fun Zone – All the latest images and data, updated daily, from Spirit, which landed on Mars 1/4/04. Other Mars resources, games, activities, etc. From NASA.
marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/funzone_flash.html
Mars: The Red Planet – This globe of Mars is a mosaic of images from the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. It is centered on Valles Marineris, the “Grand Canyon” of Mars.
planetary.org/mars/mars.html
Moon Phases – This site has an interesting way of viewing the Moon. Change the POINT OF VIEW to BOTH and see the position of the Moon in its orbit around the Earth and the phase at the same time.
www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/java/MoonPhase.html
Moon Phases – This site contains: 2 complete photographic maps of the moon, pictures of the moon and quizzes about the phases of the moon.
www.moon-phases.com/
Moon Phase Claendar – This is a great calendar showing the current and future months with moon phases and the current phase of the moon. Be sure to click on the moon to see an animated progression of the phases. Neat!
www.shetline.com/java/moonphase/moonphase.html
The Moon – The Nine Planets – This site has very useful and comprehensive information about the planets. Here you will find information and links to other planet sites as well.
seds.lpl.arizona.edu/nineplanets/nineplanets/luna.html
NASA – For upcoming NASA Quest Events, please visit the NASA Quest
Calendar at: quest.nasa.gov/calendar
NASA’s Astrobiology Institute – search for life on other planets.
nai.arc.nasa.gov
NASA Educator Resource Center – Space Foundation – Order form for available teacher resources, including curriculum booklets, videos and posters. All materials are FREE and Public Domain. Items are available for a shipping and handling fee to cover costs, either fax or send in the request.
www.spacefoundation.org/education/erc/index.html
NASA – Lunar Eclipse Page – This site has information about recent and upcoming eclipses. Be sure to check out the resources at the bottom of the page for information about solar eclipses.
sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/lunar.html
NASA Science News – All the latest space science news in an easy to read format. Great reading for a class studying science.
science.nasa.gov
New Observatory in Southern Utah – The opening of the new Musk Mars Desert Observatory marks a major new addition to the MDRS (Mars Desert Research Station). It will be used to support both the operations research program of the station itself, and to provide a means for greater direct public involvement in science and space exploration. Starting in late January, the observatory will be made available to school and other groups to control through interaction with the crew several nights each week. Schools, individuals or groups who wish to participate should send an email to: astronomy@marssociety.org.
To find out more about the Mars Society, visit the website at www.marssociety.org
NOAA Space Environment Center –
www.sec.noaa.gov
NOVA: Origins – Has the universe always existed? What was the birth of our planet like? Are we alone, or are there alien worlds waiting to be discovered? NOVA presents some startling new answers in “Origins,” a NOVA miniseries hosted by dynamic astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History. This Web site presents many of the facts and ideas in the series as well as interactive programs that delve into these questions and more.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/origins/
Pictures Of Our Universe – Stefan Seip is a German astrophotographer and has written illustrated articles for many magazines as well as the Astronomy Pictures of the Day. Find photos of star trails around Polaris, atmospheric phenomena such as auroras, the “green flash” of the sun, comets, constellations, galaxies, and more.
www.photomeeting.de/astromeeting/
Planetary Geology – And you use to think that the USGS was concerned only with earthly pursuits. Find a comprehensive site with planetary images, wallpaper and screen savers, a map-a-planet interactive that allows you to create a map at your preferred level of customization, a current research section, a kids’ section, and even GIS for the planets: U.S.G.S. Planetary GIS Web Server. Audience: middle school and up.
astrogeology.usgs.gov/
Planetary Science Research Discoveries – PSRD is an educational site sharing the latest research on planets, meteorites, and other solar system bodies being made by NASA-sponsored scientists. PSRD is a vital link for education, planetary and space science, and for learning how science works.
www.psrd.hawaii.edu/
The Planetary Society – Earth Dial Project – Links to activities and useful tools In teaching about the sun and time:
www.planetary.org/mars/earthdial/references.html
Searchable Image Collections for space science that teacher can use:
1. Astronomical Image Library: www.syz.com/images/
2. Multiwavelength Milky Way: adc.gsfc.nasa.gov/mw/
3. Astronomy Picture of the Day: antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/
4. Skyview Virtual Observatory: skyview.gsfc.nasa.gov/
5. Solar Data Archive Center: umbra.nascom.nasa.gov/
6. Constellation photos. This site has a few bugs, but the photos make up for it: www.allthesky.com/
7. NCSA Astronomy Digital Image Library (this one is tough – more for research) imagelib.ncsa.uiuc.edu/imagelib
8. Astronomy Today www.astronomytoday.com/
Size of Your World – Uses images to allow size comparisons of our solar system to distant stars. A real eye opener.
newsizeofourworld.ytmnd.com/
Solar Terrestrial Probes Program –
stp.gsfc.nasa.gov
Space Day – Learn about space day and what teachers and students can do for space day.
www.spaceday.com
Star Count – A new project from NASA: Investigation: Do people everywhere see the same number of stars in the night sky? Why or why not?
www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/starcount/home/
Storms from the Sun (K-12) – This educational poster contains information about the Sun, coronal mass ejections and how they affect Earth. Very informative.
http://spacelink.nasa.gov/products/Storms.from.the.Sun.Poster/
Sun-Earth Connection
sec.gsfc.nasa.gov
Thursday’s Classroom – The aim of Thursday’s Classroom is to provide a lasting connection between NASA’s latest research and the classroom environment.
www.thursdaysclassroom.com/index_24aug00.htm
USGS Astrogeology Research Program – The mission of the USGS Astrogeology Research Program is to establish and maintain geoscientific and technical expertise in planetary science and remote sensing to perform the following tasks: scientifically study and map extraterrestrial bodies, plan and conduct planetary exploration missions, and explore and develop new technologies in data processing and analysis, archiving, and distribution. One of the best resources included in this site is a complete catalog of the hundreds of USGS maps of the moons of the solar system, including Earth’s Moon, Io, Ganymede, Titan, and more, and all of the planets. This site also includes a maps and globes gallery for the planets and moons, and Lunar, Venus, and Mars online interactive maps, animations, and GIS data downloads.
astrogeology.usgs.gov/
Virtual Reality Moon Phase Pictures – You can use this site to view the phase of the moon for any time and date from 1800 to 2199.
tycho.usno.navy.mil/vphase.html
Windows to the Universe – A fun and different Web site about the Earth and Space sciences. Windows to the Universe is graphics intensive! Tons of space information, teacher resources, and kid stuff including quizzes and educational ‘games’. A great site to visit.
windows2universe.org

Interactive Internet Sites Books

Mystery of Mars by Ride, Sally and Tam O’Shaughnessy. Grade 3-6. Intelligent, comprehensive, and colorful introduction of Mars aimed at young readers. The book is presented as if you were on your way to solve the mystery of Mars yourself–flying over or stepping onto the surface. Hardcover: ISBN 0517709716.

Secondary

Space Science

Lesson Plans

Edible RocksDeveloped by NASA to encourage observation skills and to expose students to the terminology when describing meteorites.

Space Time DiscussionTo help students comprehend the vast distances between stars, and starlight we see may be millions of years old. The teacher will help students understand how astronomers find out about the origins of the universe.

Lesson Plan Links

Astronomy – Selected Labs and Activities from Earth to Class.
http://earth2class.org/curr_units/astro%20labs.php
Earth’s Magnetic Field – is the focus of the POETRY website, which explores solar storms & how they affect us, space weather, & the Northern Lights. A 64-page workbook of hands-on activities examines Earth’s magnetosphere. Create a classroom magnetometer. Solve the space science problem of the week. (NASA)
image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/
Seeing the Invisible – offers a guide & workbook to help students discover that the sun emits light in wavelengths outside the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Activities allow students to view unique features of the Sun that are revealed only by certain spectral wavelengths of light. (NASA)
http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/class6-8.htm
Solar Storms & You – is a series of 6 workbooks on solar activity & sunspots, solar wind, magnetic storms, aurora, & satellite design (Grades 7-9). (NASA)
http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry//higley.html
Imagine the Universe – includes lesson plans on wavelengths & frequencies, sizes of stars, gamma-ray bursts, the binary number system, the probability of life elsewhere in the universe, analyzing images from digital satellite data, measuring periodic behavior, logarithmic plotting & classification of objects by their mathematical behavior, the origin of the elements & their identification in supernova remnants, & identifying elements using spectroscopy. (NASA)
http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/teachers/lesson_plans.html
Solar System Exploration – features lesson plans on electro-magnetism, energy, exploration, gravity, pioneers, landforms, life, light, math ratios, matter, measurement, modeling, origin, planet surfaces, rocks & minerals, the scientific method, & triangulation. Classroom & informal learning activities focus on meteorites, comets, the sun, planet change & constancy, the search for life in the solar system, & missions to outer planets. (NASA)
http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/educ/lessons.cfm
Sky Server – Index of teacher guides for SkyServer’s science projects.
http://skyserver.sdss.org/edr/en/proj/teachers/
Powers of Ten – Not really a lesson plan per se, but so powerful it has been included under lesson plans. Project to your class and students will be in awe of this exercise.
http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/
NASA – “Drawing a Scale Model of the Universe” from NASA’s Space Place:
spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/educators/comet_orbits_cnsr.pdf#xml=http
NASA’s Deep Impact Mission has a module called Designing Craters in which students model impact cratering. The Deep Impact spacecraft which launched last month is scheduled to impact comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005.
deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/designing_craters/
MESSENGER Program – Modules contain lessons on the Solar System and our place in space. All of the modules have lessons specifically geared to K-2, 3-4, 5-8, and 9-12 levels. They work well in cooperative groups.
btc.montana.edu/ceres/MESSENGER/teachers/Modules/MessEducat.htm#Exploring
University of Hawai’i at Manoa – The Hawai’i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology offers more than 25 hands-on science activities are provided in classroom-ready pages for both teachers and students for exploring Earth, the planets, geology, and space sciences.
www.spacegrant.hawaii.edu/class_acts/SolarSystemDoc.html
Destination: Mars – Have you ever thought what it would be like if we lived in outer space? Think about what types of things you will need to survive in space. Will they be similar to what you need to survive here on earth or different?
Lesson plan: www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM392
Travel in the Solar System – This lesson affords students the opportunity to think about two aspects of the time required to complete space travel within the solar system.
illuminations.nctm.org/lessonplans/6-8/travel/index.html
Martian Microbes? – If there was life on Mars in the past, what would confirm that? How could ancient organisms have come into being? This page includes an activity that demonstrates how cell membranes might have formed, as well as links to other lesson plans and Webcasts about the search for life on Mars, articles about the search for water, and more.
www.exploratorium.edu/mars/teachers/microbes.html
Imagine Yourself on Mars – Exploring the Martian Environment. If you could stand on the surface of Mars, what would you experience? This activity demonstrates the effect of lower atmospheric pressure on water that might exist on Mars. There are also links to instructions on how to make a Martian calendar, how to figure your age and weight on Mars, a Webcast about the Martian environment, and more.
www.exploratorium.edu/mars/teachers/onmars.html
Rambling Red Rover – What tools are aboard the Mars Exploration Rover and what are they searching for? In this activity you can use photos taken by the Rover to make the same 3-D images scientists will use to study the planet’s surface. There are also links to information about the Rover’s other tools, instructions for making your own 3-D glasses, and more.
www.exploratorium.edu/mars/teachers/rover.html
Mars Millennium Project Home Page – a national education program in which students design a colony on Mars in the year 2030.
www.planetary.org/html/mmp/
Phases of the Moon – This site has loads of information about moon phases along with a way to retrieve information about what phase the moon was in over 100 years ago. A local teacher used this to have her students look up what phase the moon was in on the day of their birth. They loved it!
aa.usno.navy.mil/faq/docs/moon_phases.html
Live from the Aurora (K-12) – This educator guide includes activities and lesson plans designed to challenge students into further investigating the dynamic nature of the Sun and its connection to the Earth.
sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/sunearthday/2003/educators_guide2003/index.html
Exploring Meteorite Mysteries From NASA
spacelink.nasa.gov/Instructional.Materials/
NASA.Educational.Products/Exploring.Meteorite.Mysteries/
Destination Mars from NASA – Lessons designed to increase students’ knowledge, awareness, and curiosity about the process of scientific exploration of Mars.
www-curator.jsc.nasa.gov/outreach1/EdProducts.htm
The NEAR mission – Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous – created by teachers in the Lockheed Martin Graduate Fellows Program has 11 space science-related lesson plans.
near.jhuapl.edu/Education/index.html
Teacher developed Earth and Space science lessons – most of which require the student to be online to use the lesson. Includes doing Astrophysics Research with an Artificial Earth Orbiting Satellite, Sine Waves, The Electromagnetic Spectrum, Images of the Universe in Different Wavelengths, Satellite Communications, Satellite Dishes, Constellations and the Zodiac, Solar System Objects, Earthquakes, and More! Some are quite complex.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/lessons/lessons_teacherdeveloped.html
Exploring Planets in the Classroom – More than 25 hands-on activities from the Hawaii Space Grant Consortium are provided in classroom-ready pages for both teachers and students for exploring Earth, the planets, geology, and space sciences.
www.spacegrant.hawaii.edu/class_acts/index.html
Space Science Activities, Hawaiian Style – mostly demonstrations, some lesson plans.
www.spacegrant.hawaii.edu/hi-nsta2001.html
Find That Planet! – by Alan Gould. For middle and high school students. Make a horizon planetarium to find the locations of planets in the sky. High School students can use position data to make a sky map.
cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/SegwayEd/abtfindp.html
Life on Mars: Science Fact or Science Fiction? (Grades to 6-8, 9-12) – Investigating and Evaluating the Possibility of Life on Other Planets. In this lesson, students investigate the basic requirements needed for human survival and contemplate the possibility of sustaining life on other planets, as is being researched by the recently-launched Mars Polar Lande r and the Mars Climate Orbiter. As the main activity, students work in small groups to create a chart and a graph comparing statistics of the nine planets in the solar system and evaluating the elements that prevent life from flourishing on other planets.
www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/19990105tuesday.html
A Whole New World (Grades to 6-8, 9-12) – Investigating Direct Evidence of an Extrasolar Planet and the Sustenance of Life on Different Worlds. In this lesson, students explore the significance of direct scientific evidence of an extrasolar planet, focusing on the relationship of this new discovery to the notion of survival of living things on other planets. S tudents work in small groups to investigate statistics regarding the nine planets in the solar system and participate in a ‘scientific conference’ to examine the elements that allow or prevent life from flourishing on other planets. Students then explor e the available information about the extrasolar planet and assess the importance of this astronomical find.
www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/19991116tuesday.html
Look on the Bright Side! (Grades to 6-8, 9-12) – Making Models of Solar Eclipses and Building Pinhole Projectors. In this lesson, students learn about solar eclipses by participating in a number of hands-on activities. In class, students work in teams using tennis balls, grapes and flashlights to model partial and total solar ecli pses. At home, students build pinhole projectors and experiment with how they work.
www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/19990810tuesday.html
Space Place “Activities” – Activity plans, some are a bit too wordy and not enough activity.
spaceplace.nasa.gov/teachers_page2.htm
The Magnetometer – Students will build an instrument capable of detecting a magnetic field and magnetic polarity.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/magnetometer_edu.html
Plotting Sunspot Activity – Students will learn how to graph sunspots, also called active regions (AR’s), on the Sun using a solar graph. They then can make generalizations about where sunspots usually occur on the Sun.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/sunspotplot_edu.html
Charting the Planets – NASA Educational Brief – Learning to use a chart of data can be helpful in several ways. First, a chart can provide an orderly list of individual facts. A second way to use a chart is to look for trends and patterns in the data. Learn about these in this lesson.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/charting_the_planets.html
Galileo Curriculum Module – The Galileo spacecraft, after a 6-year journey, arrived at Jupiter in December, 1995, and began a tour of the planet and its system of moons. “Let us help you and your students understand and appreciate WHY we’re going and WHAT we hope to learn there.”
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/galileo/1.html
Solar System Puzzle Kit – Comprehensive activity in which students make an eight cube version of the solar system.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/puzzle_kit/pk_cover.html
Space Based Astronomy Teacher’s Guide – Activities, experiments, and readings dealing with NASA’s space based astronomy.
www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/teacher_resources/space_astronomy/cover.html
The Sun Times – Global Temperature Project – Join schools from around the world as they try to figure out how their geographic location (i.e. where they live) affects their average daily temperature and hours of sunlight. Specifically, students will: * Measure the temperature and record the number of minutes of sunlight per day over a common week. Compare and contrast the results with classes from all over the world. Determine how proximity to the equator affects average daily temperature and hours of sunlight.
www.k12science.org/curriculum/tempproj2/
Asteroid Watch: Fireball in the Sky – This CIESE collaborative project which asks students to determine the consequences of objects from space striking the earth by studying impact craters. The culmination of the project is to find actual asteroids and determine whether they are a threat or not. (Recommended Grade Levels 5-12 but all are invited to participate).
www.k12science.org/nasa2/

Secondary

Space Science

Additional Resources

Interactive Internet Sites Books
USGS Astrogeology Research Program – The mission of the USGS Astrogeology Research Program is to establish and maintain geoscientific and technical expertise in planetary science and remote sensing to perform the following tasks: scientifically study and map extraterrestrial bodies, plan and conduct planetary exploration missions, and explore and develop new technologies in data processing and analysis, archiving, and distribution. One of the best resources included in this site is a complete catalog of the hundreds of USGS maps of the moons of the solar system, including Earth’s Moon, Io, Ganymede, Titan, and more, and all of the planets. This site also includes a maps and globes gallery for the planets and moons, and Lunar, Venus, and Mars online interactive maps, animations, and GIS data downloads.
astrogeology.usgs.gov/
Pictures of Our Universe – Stefan Seip is a German astrophotographer and has written illustrated articles for many magazines as well as the Astronomy Pictures of the Day. Find photos of star trails around Polaris, atmospheric phenomena such as auroras, the “green flash” of the sun, comets, constellations, galaxies, and more.
www.photomeeting.de/astromeeting/
The Moon – The Nine (8) Planets – This site has very useful and comprehensive information about the planets. Here you will find information and links to other planet sites as well.
http://www.nineplanets.org/
The Inconstant Moon – This extremely useful site contains a calendar to see the phase of each day and to get information about the moon. Scroll down to the menu at the bottom of the main page and click on Atlas to be able to see pictures of the moon’s surface.
www.inconstantmoon.com
Lunar Eclipses for Beginners – This site has an explanation of why an eclipse occurs. Scroll down for information about when other eclipses will be happening. Scroll down to find pictures of lunar eclipses.
www.mreclipse.com/Special/LEprimer.html
Earth and Moon Viewer – This site allows you to explore the earth and moon, viewing each from different perspectives. Additional links to other sites.
www.fourmilab.ch/earthview/vplanet.html
Apollo 11 – 30th Anniversary – This is a Web site for the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. It has links to other NASA and non-NASA sites. Be sure to check out the galleries for great pictures. The timelines of Manned Apollo Missions and Lunar Exploration Chronology are really fascinating.
www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/ap11ann/timelines.htm
Moon Phases – This site has an interesting way of viewing the Moon. Change the POINT OF VIEW to BOTH and see the position of the Moon in its orbit around the Earth and the phase at the same time.
www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/java/MoonPhase.html
Moon Phase Calendar – This is a great calendar showing the current and future months with moon phases and the current phase of the moon. Be sure to click on the moon to see an animated progression of the phases. Neat!
www.shetline.com/java/moonphase/moonphase.html
NASA – Lunar Eclipse Page – This site has information about recent and upcoming eclipses. Be sure to check out the resources at the bottom of the page for information about solar eclipses.
sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/lunar.html
Keith’s Moon Page – Facts, Phases, Photos, and Folklore – There is quite a bit of information about the moon here. Enjoy!
home.hiwaay.net/~krcool/Astro/moon/
Virtual Reality Moon Phase Pictures – You can use this site to view the phase of the moon for any time and date from 1800 to 2199.
tycho.usno.navy.mil/vphase.html
Astronomy Picture of the Moon – This site shows you the moon contiunually cycling through its phases. Be sure to click on “Discover the Cosmos.” Each day a different image or photograph of the universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap010218.html
Astronomy Diagrams – For introductory astronomy classes.
astro.wsu.edu/worthey/astro/html/lec-celestial-sph.html
Classroom Planetarium – Stellarium is a free open source planetarium for your computer. It shows a realistic sky in 3D, just like what you see with the naked eye, binoculars or a telescope. It is being used in planetarium projectors. Just set your coordinates and go.
stellarium.sourceforge.net/
Gravity Probe B – is a “relativity gyroscope” experiment designed to test two unverified predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity (1916): that the presence of a mass in space, such as the Earth, would warp local spacetime, creating a dip or curve in spacetime, & that the rotation of a mass in space would twist or drag the local spacetime frame around it. An educator’s guide & space science activities are included. (NASA)
http://einstein.stanford.edu/
Infrared Astronomy Tutorial – [this is an awesome site] infrared light, how it was discovered, infrared astronomy, atmospheric windows, & more. An infrared astronomy timeline is included, along with links to news & discoveries, images, & classroom activities. (NASA)
http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/cosmic_classroom/ir_tutorial/
Magnetic Field Activities for the High School Classroom – helps students understand the vector nature of fields, the ubiquity of fields in the environment, & the 3-dimensionality of fields. Activities include mapping the magnetic field of a room, making a magnetometer, & studying plasma. (NASA)
http://istp.gsfc.nasa.gov/istp/outreach/ed
Radio JOVE: Planetary Radio Astronomy for Schools – helps students & amateur scientists observe & analyze natural radio emissions of Jupiter & the Sun. Through the study of their magnetic fields & their plasma (charged particle) environments, we are better able to understand the Earth. (NASA)
http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Size of Your World – Uses images to allow size comparisons of our solar system to distant stars. A real eye opener. Site opens with music.
newsizeofourworld.ytmnd.com/
Star Count – Student Observation Network — A new project from NASA: Investigation: Do people everywhere see the same number of stars in the night sky? Why or why not?
www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/starcount/home/
The Planetary Society – Earth Dial Project – Links to activities and useful tools In teaching about the sun and time:
www.planetary.org/mars/earthdial/references.html
Celesta – An extensive free download which students can use to research the planets, stars and other space topics. Also includes lesson plans.
www.celestiamotherlode.net/educational.html
Keplar’s Law Interactives – McGraw-Hill provides an assortment of very good, upper level animated Interactives. These Interactives offer a fresh and dynamic method to teach the astronomy basics. Each Interactive will allow students to manipulate parameters and gain a better understanding of topics such as Blackbody Radiation, The Bohr Model, Retrograde Motion, and the H-R Diagram by watching the effect of these manipulations.
http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072482621/student_view0/interactives.html
Solar System Collaboratory – Modules on space topics such as space weather, Keplar’s Laws, and more:
http://solarsystem.colorado.edu/home/lowRes.html
Includes the following interactives on Keplar’s Laws: More interactives on Keplar’s three laws:
• http://solarsystem.colorado.edu/applets/KeplersThird/
• http://solarsystem.colorado.edu/applets/KeplersSecond/
• http://solarsystem.colorado.edu/applets/KeplersFirst/
NOVA: Origins – Has the universe always existed? What was the birth of our planet like? Are we alone, or are there alien worlds waiting to be discovered? NOVA presents some startling new answers in “Origins,” a NOVA miniseries hosted by dynamic astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History. This Web site presents many of the facts and ideas in the series as well as interactive programs that delve into these questions and more.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/origins/
Earth vs. Mars: The Two Planets Weigh In – from Space.com find a concise comparison of the two planets on almost two dozen variables including weather, caves, gravity, cosmic radiation.
www.space.com/scienceastronomy/mars_tape_030819.html
Space Day – Learn about space day and what teachers and students can do for space day.
www.spaceday.com
Mars: The Red Planet – This globe of Mars is a mosaic of images from the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. It is centered on Valles Marineris, the “Grand Canyon” of Mars.
planetary.org/mars/mars.html
The Nine Planets – an overview of the history, mythology, and current scientific knowledge of each of the planets and moons in our solar system. Each page has text and images, some have sounds and movies, most provide references to additional related information.
seds.lpl.arizona.edu/nineplanets/nineplanets/nineplanets.html
Thursday’s Classroom – The aim of Thursday’s Classroom is to provide a lasting connection between NASA’s latest research and the classroom environment.
www.thursdaysclassroom.com/index_24aug00.htm
Mars Exploration Rover Mission Fun Zone – All the latest images and data, updated daily, from Spirit, which landed on Mars 1/4/04. Other Mars resources, games, activities, etc. From NASA.
marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/funzone_flash.html
The Exploratorium – A museum with space resources for teachers and students. This site also has updates on the Mars landing of the Spirit exploration rover.
www.exploratorium.edu
The Center for Mars Exploration – A Web page outlining NASA’s strategy for Mars exploration, including video clips from past missions.
cmex-www.arc.nasa.gov/CMEX/index.html
Terraforming Mars – What would it take for humans to live on Mars? This article explores the possible use of greenhouse gases to create a warm, breathable environment on the red planet. Includes links to a NASA conference on Martian habitability.
www.firstscience.com/site/articles/terraform.asp
Colonizing Mars – Will Earthlings ever try to inhabit Mars? What would a human colony look like? This site imagines a Mars where humans are landing at a rate of 2,000 a week. Take a look at what some people think is the fate of Mars and then imagine one of your own.
www.marsproject.com/index.htm
Searchable Image Collections for space science that teacher can use:
1. Astronomical Image Library: www.syz.com/images/
2. Multiwavelength Milky Way: adc.gsfc.nasa.gov/mw/
3. Astronomy Picture of the Day: antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/
4. Skyview Virtual Observatory: skyview.gsfc.nasa.gov/
5. Solar Data Archive Center: umbra.nascom.nasa.gov/
6. Constellation photos. This site has a few bugs, but the photos make up for it: www.allthesky.com/
7. NCSA Astronomy Digital Image Library (this one is tough – more for research) imagelib.ncsa.uiuc.edu/imagelib
8. Astronomy Today www.astronomytoday.com/
Voyages Through Time – the SETI Institute’s new integrated high school science curriculum, is now published and available! Introduction: The universe, the totality of all things that exist, is thought to have begun with an explosion of space and time and the expansion of a hot, dense mass of elementary particles and photons, that has evolved over billions of years into the stars and galaxies we observe today. This grand epic is the story told in the Cosmic Evolution module of Voyages Through Time.
To learn more about VTT visit the VTT website voyagesthroughtime.org
TEACHERS, GENESIS WANTS YOU! – Educators around the country are invited to field test education modules or Genesis Kids materials this school year. (The Genesis spacecraft continues its mission collecting solar wind material expelled from the Sun.) They will send you a print copy of the module that you have selected and an evaluation packet to help you provide them with your feedback.
Interested educators can learn more by visiting www.mcrel.org/epo/dev_field.asp
Questions? Contact John Ristvey at 303-632-5620 or jristvey@mcrel.org
Storms from the Sun (K-12) – This educational poster contains information about the Sun, coronal mass ejections and how they affect Earth. Very informative.
spacelink.nasa.gov/products/Storms.from.the.Sun.Poster/
Living with a Star (K-12) – This educator guide is designed to provide educators with a quick reference to an impressive amount of materials and resources that are useful for understanding the connections between the Sun and Earth.
spacelink.nasa.gov/products/Living.with.a.Star/
NASA Science News – All the latest space science news in an easy to read format. Great reading for a class studying science.
science.nasa.gov
Planetary Science Research Discoveries – PSRD is an educational site sharing the latest research on planets, meteorites, and other solar system bodies being made by NASA-sponsored scientists. PSRD is a vital link for education, planetary and space science, and for learning how science works.
www.psrd.hawaii.edu/
Tasa Graphic Arts Company – has produced state of the art multimedia products for use in the Earth Science and Environment Science Classrooms. Of particular interest is an interactive CD-ROM on Explore the Planets, as well as others on rocks, minerals and plate tectonics. They provide online ordering. To receive a 15% discount for teachers who visit the GSA website, contact Tasa Graphic Arts to receive a special web address and discount code.
www.tasagraphicarts.com
e-mail: info@tasagraphicarts.com, phone: 1-800-293-2725 or (505) 758-5535
Earth Science Internet Campus – from EOA Scientific Systems (site suggested by Tom McGuire, Earth Science Author & Consultant), Find a series of clever, interactive, shockwave animations, ranging in size from 36 K to 2000 K, that can be used to introduce the following concepts:
1. Earth: Earthquakes, Seismic Waves and Activity, Earthquake Epicenter; Tectonic Plates and Tectonic Mapping; Glaciers; Hydrological Cycle;
2. Ocean: Sea Pressure and Depth; Secchi Disk; Animal Adaptations – Animals Which Camouflage; Fill the Earth with Oceans (sea level change);
3. Atmosphere: Variations of Tropospheric Thickness; Temperature of the Atmosphere; Wind Direction – The Jet Stream / Jet Stream Map; The Coriolis Effect; Sun’s Radiation on Earth – Angle of Incidence/solar altitude; Weather Education, Facts and Trivia; Lightning Game;
4. Space: The Solar System Planets; Satellite Remote Sensing / Taking Satellite Pictures;
5. Science: Periodic Table of Elements; Weight Mass Volume Density Gravity; Characteristics of All Waves.
www.eoascientific.com/prototype/newcampus/campus.html and then look for “interactive exercises” under the “earth,” “ocean,” “atmosphere,” “space,” and “science” links. Audience: Middle School and Up. Need a classroom of powerful computers, will have you download Shockwave.
Earth-Sun Relationships – Lots of interesting information, no real lesson plans:
personal.cmich.edu/~franc1m/earthsun.htm
Planetary Geology – And you use to think that the USGS was concerned only with earthly pursuits. Find a comprehensive site with planetary images, wallpaper and screen savers, a map-a-planet interactive that allows you to create a map at your preferred level of customization, a current research section, a kids’ section, and even GIS for the planets: U.S.G.S. Planetary GIS Web Server. Audience: middle school and up.
astrogeology.usgs.gov/
How to Identify Meteorites –
www.meteoritebroker.com/identify.htm
Living With a Star –
lws.gsfc.nasa.gov
Sun-Earth Connection
sec.gsfc.nasa.gov
Solar Terrestrial Probes Program –
stp.gsfc.nasa.gov
NOAA Space Environment Center –
www.sec.noaa.gov
Genesis Education and Public Outreach
genesismission.jpl.nasa.gov
NASA’s Astrobiology Institute – search for life on other planets.
nai.arc.nasa.gov
Free Astronomy Lessons – Make the year 2003 your space odyssey by learning astronomy! Dr. Jamie Love will be presenting 4 lessons each month throughout the year – totaling 48 lessons. This course is a healthy mix of observational and academic (scientific) astronomy so you will learn identification and a great deal about stars and the universe. This is a low math (no math?) astronomy course but it covers a great deal of astronomy. Each month Dr. Love will rotate in and out another 4 more lessons, so don’t miss a month! The January lessons will be constantly posted (because they present very important, fundamental materials) but the February lessons will be replaced by the March lessons as you move into the next month. And so it goes. Also, every “quarter” of the year, Dr. Love will post two self-grading astronomy exams (one to test your identification skills and the other to access your scientific understanding) covering the material in the previous four months. By the end of 2003 you will have studied 48 lessons, taken eight exams, and be well educated in astronomy!
Visit and bookmark: www.synapses.co.uk/astro/index.html
NASA – For upcoming NASA Quest Events, please visit the NASA Quest
Calendar at: quest.nasa.gov/calendar
New Observatory in Southern Utah – The opening of the new Musk Mars Desert Observatory marks a major new addition to the MDRS (Mars Desert Research Station). It will be used to support both the operations research program of the station itself, and to provide a means for greater direct public involvement in science and space exploration. Starting in late January, the observatory will be made available to school and other groups to control through interaction with the crew several nights each week. Schools, individuals or groups who wish to participate should send an email to: astronomy@marssociety.org.
To find out more about the Mars Society, visit the website at www.marssociety.org
NASA Educator Resource Center – Space Foundation – Order form for available teacher resources, including curriculum booklets, videos and posters. All materials are FREE and Public Domain. Items are available for a shipping and handling fee to cover costs, either fax or send in the request.
www.spacefoundation.org/education/erc/index.html
Windows to the Universe – A fun and different Web site about the Earth and Space sciences. Windows to the Universe is graphics intensive! Tons of space information, teacher resources, and kid stuff including quizzes and educational ‘games’. A great site to visit.
windows2universe.org
Students, Fly a Spacecraft – High school and college students who want to learn how to fly a spacecraft can access the homepage of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s The Basics of Space Flight. It is a self-teaching guide created originally to help JPL spacecraft operators understand the concepts of and relationships among various specialized elements of a space mission. Interactive quizzes on the site can give users a measurement of their progress.
www.jpl.nasa.gov/basics

Interactive Internet Sites Books
Meteorites and their Parent Planets, by Harry Y. McSween, Jr.
This book is jargon-free yet manages to gently lead the reader through tough topics like mineralogy, isotope geology, the origins of the elements, or reflectance spectroscopy. This book is for anyone who wants to know about meteorites. Paperback: ISBN 0521587514, Hardcover: ISBN 0521583039.

Elementary

Water

Lesson Plan Links

NOAA Ocean Explorer – provides 165 lesson plans developed to bring entire classrooms “on board” for exploration and discovery. Topics include deep-sea hydrothermal vents and their spectacular animal communities, benthic creatures of the Northern Gulf of Mexico (one of Earth’s most geologically complex regions), seafloor methane, unexplored deep reef habitats off the Carolinas, the Titanic, and the mystery of the Steamship Portland (lost in a 1898 storm off New England). (NOAA)
http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/edu/welcome.html
TREASURES @ SEA: Exploring the ocean through literature – A K-8 site with many activities about the ocean focusing on reading. Some lesson plans on the site, some are links to other Web sites.
www.fi.edu/fellows/fellow8/dec98/main.html
Freddy the Fish – A nice activity for lower grades that helps students identify ways man pollutes our water supply; determine the harmful effects of our careless habits; and state the effects water pollution has on plant and animal life.
www2.tltc.ttu.edu/Thomas/conference paper/tes1998/Freddy the Fish.htm
Disappearing Water – Students will observe the amount of water in an open container over time, and they will observe the amount of water in a closed container over time. Students will compare and contrast the sets of observations over time.
www.sciencenetlinks.com/lessons.cfm?BenchmarkID=4&DocID=168
Landforms – Students learn how water and erosion affect the landscape, research a specific landform, and create a visual display of landform.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/landforms/
Tidal Wave or Tsunami lesson plan –
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/dynamicearth/
The Water Cycle – Prepare terrariums for initial observations; Use terrariums to connect concepts of precipitation, condensation, and evaporation into a unified water cycle concept. Springboard for other lessons on condensation and evaporation.
www.luc.edu/schools/education/science/zframe.htm
The U.S. Geological Survey’s Water Education Poster series – Offers 6 colorful, educational, and fun posters on the following topics: Wetlands, Water Use, Wastewater, Navigation, Ground Water, Water Quality.
Each poster is available in two versions, one for elementary students and one for middle-school students. Information is available at this web site: water.usgs.gov/outreach/OutReach.html
This outreach activity is part of the larger USGS Learning Web, which can be found at this web site: www.usgs.gov/education/
Florida’s Springs: Protecting Nature’s Gems – is an in-depth photo-documentary exploration of Florida’s springs and aquifers. It includes lesson plans for all grade levels, a great interactive on the hydrologic cycle, and an online photographic expedition exploring deep into the aquifer in order to follow the journey of water (along with some Florida tourism plugs).
Use this address to go directly to the lesson plans: www.floridasprings.org/resources/ or drop the “/resources” to go to the home page. K-6 lesson plans are: “Water, Water Everywhere” and “Build Your Own Aquifer”.
Down the Drain – This Internet-based collaborative project will allow students to share information about water usage with other students from around the country and the world. Based on data collected by their household members and their classmates, students will determine the average amount of water used by one person in a day. They will compare this to the average amount of water used per person per day in other parts of the world. Grades 4-8.
www.k12science.org/curriculum/drainproj/

Elementary

Water

Additional Resources

Processes of River Erosion, Transport, and Deposition – Animations and visualizations from Carleton College.
http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/visualization/collections/erosion_deposition.html
River Processes – Site with animated river processes posted by Wycombe High School.
www.school-portal.co.uk/GroupRenderCustomPage.asp?GroupID=12426&ResourceId=60796
World Water Monitoring Day – To help facilitate your planning, WWMD has expanded the “Resources” section of this Web site to contain a variety of materials designed to make your event a success. – from the UN, this comprehensive, well organized site about oceans is divided into four main sections.
http://www.worldwatermonitoringday.org/

Intermediate

Water

Lesson Plans

Groundwater Contamination Lesson Plan – (7-12) Uses a concept diagram to aid with comprehension of two articles concerning contamination of underground drinking water supplies.

Groundwater – Water we doing to our planet? – Students will calculate yearly runoff created by a parking lot, and calculate the loss of water that would have entered the groundwater system.

Land vs. Water Temperature Lab – (6-12) – To illustrate how dark land surfaces, light land surfaces and water all heat at different rates. Illustrates that water heats more slowly than land and therefore the surface of the Earth must heat at different rates, causing our weather.

Lesson Plan Links

Acid Rain – 5 lessons from the National Park Service
www.aqd.nps.gov/ard/lessons.html
Coral Reef Connections – This resource explores Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, the largest structure on Earth built by living organisms. It demonstrates the types of relationships among living things that have contributed to this incredible biodiversity and elaborates on some of the adaptations that have enabled species to survive and reproduce in this unique habitat. Younger students may need help with links.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/survival/coral/index.html
Demands on the Land – Posterback activity from Science & Children. In this role-playing activity students research and debate viewpoints of different groups regarding removal of wild horses from the range. National Science Education Standard F: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives-Populations, resources, and environments.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/wild_bunch/wildbunch7a.html
Down the Drain – This Internet-based collaborative project will allow students to share information about water usage with other students from around the country and the world. Based on data collected by their household members and their classmates, students will determine the average amount of water used by one person in a day. They will compare this to the average amount of water used per person per day in other parts of the world. Grades 4-8.
www.k12science.org/curriculum/drainproj/
Earth’s Hydrologic Cycle – A new twist on an old standby. Demonstration of the hydrologic cycle using an upside down aquarium and a bowl of water. Contains links to images, CD activities and vocabulary words.
topex-www.jpl.nasa.gov/education/activities/ts1ssac2.pdf
El Nino – To understand that El Nino is caused by changes in the atmospheric and ocean content.
www.sciencenetlinks.com/lessons.cfm?BenchmarkID=4&DocID=157
EnvironSci – The following site has lots of detailed background information and some activities and lesson plans for 4-8 and 9-12 water studies.
www.leo.lehigh.edu/envirosci/guide/index.html
Ever Wonder What Causes a Pot of Water to Boil? – If you have, this project’s for you! We have people all over the world boiling water! In the past we’ve had climbers on Mt. Everest, school children in La Paz, Bolivia and college professors in Cheyenne, Wyoming all participating in the project. The purpose of this project is to discover which factor in the experiment (room temperature, elevation, volume of water, or heating device) has the greatest influence on boiling point. Anyone can participate in this year’s project. All you have to do is boil a bit of water, record a bit of information, and send it along to us to include in the database of results. Then, students can analyze all of the data to reach an answer to the question: What causes a pot of water to boil? It’s that simple!
www.k12science.org/curriculum/boilproj/index.html
Florida’s Springs: Protecting Nature’s Gems – is an in-depth photo-documentary exploration of Florida’s springs and aquifers. It includes lesson plans for all grade levels, a great interactive on the hydrologic cycle, and an online photographic expedition exploring deep into the aquifer in order to follow the journey of water (along with some Florida tourism plugs).
Use this address to go directly to the lesson plans: www.floridasprings.org/resources/ or drop the “/resources” to go to the home page. The 6-8 lesson plan is: “Water’s Journey Expedition” – First activity challenges students’ writing skills by requiring them to write about the Water’s Journey Expedition. Second activity requires students to explore the Florida Springs website to identify and write about human impact on springs and the aquifer.
The Global Water Sampling Project: An Investigation of Water Quality – From April 1 until June 6, 2003, students will team up around the globe to test fresh water. Join us in this collaborative project, comparing the water quality of your local river, stream, lake or pond with other fresh water sources around the world. The focus of the project is: 1. To assess the quality of water based on physical characteristics and chemical substances. 2. To look for relationships and trends among the data collected by all project participants. All students are welcome to participate, however, it is recommended for high school students (ages 14-18) due to the nature of the tests required for the project.
www.k12science.org/curriculum/waterproj/index.shtml
Groundwater Movement – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, September 1996 p. 47. In this activity, students predict how water will move through rock materials such as sand, gravel and clay and then they test their hypotheses.
www.blm.gov/education/high_plains/groundwater.html
Landforms – Students learn how water and erosion affect the landscape, research a specific landform, and create a visual display of landform.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/landforms/
Mapping Deserts – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, Feb. 2001, p. 33. In this activity, students research, map and report on the world’s deserts, including subtropical, coastal, interior, and rain shadow deserts. National Geography Standard 8: The characteristics and spatial distribution of ecosystems on earth’s surface.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/mojave/mojave02a.html
NOAA Ocean Explorer – provides 165 lesson plans developed to bring entire classrooms “on board” for exploration and discovery. Topics include deep-sea hydrothermal vents and their spectacular animal communities, benthic creatures of the Northern Gulf of Mexico (one of Earth’s most geologically complex regions), seafloor methane, unexplored deep reef habitats off the Carolinas, the Titanic, and the mystery of the Steamship Portland (lost in a 1898 storm off New England). (NOAA)
http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/edu/welcome.html
pHresh Air: Hits you in the Pocketbook – An integrated unit of study focusing on the local effects of global air pollution. Students will study the causes and effects of acid rain, sources and locations of polluters in Wisconsin, and the effects of weather events on the movement of polluted emissions. Students will also study the Clean Air Act of 1994 and governmental programs to enforce and encourage compliance. Students will further study the proposed creation of the Chicago Energy Exchange as a vehicle for encouraging compliance.
nesen.unl.edu/lessons/envirchange/mkphreshhp.html
The Power of Water – Classroom Activity from Science & Children, March 1998, p. 40. Students use a pinwheel to illustrate hydroelectric power in this activity.
www.blm.gov/education/00_resources/articles/Columbia_river_basin/classroom.html
Project WET – The goal of Project WET is to facilitate and promote awareness, appreciation, knowledge, and stewardship of water resources through the development and dissemination of classroom-ready teaching aids and through the establishment of state and internationally sponsored Project WET programs. Go to the Incredible Journey for a lesson plan.
www.montana.edu/wwwwet/
Take A Dip! – Students are teaming up around the globe to test fresh water. Join us in this collaborative project, comparing the water quality of your local river, stream, lake or pond with other fresh water sources around the world. From April 1 – June 6, 2003, students will team up around the globe to test fresh water. The focus of the project is: * To assess the quality of water based on physical characteristics and chemical substances. * To assess the quality of water based on macroinvertebrates found in the water. * To look for relationships and trends among the data collected by all project participants. Recommended Grade Levels 6-8 but all are invited to participate.
www.k12science.org/curriculum/dipproj/index.shtml
TREASURES @ SEA: Exploring the ocean through literature – A K-8 site with many activities about the ocean focusing on reading. Some lesson plans on the site, some are links to other Web sites.
www.fi.edu/fellows/fellow8/dec98/main.html
Water: A Never-Ending Story – A module in which students will first carry out a number of activities that demonstrate the concepts of evaporation, condensation, precipitation, and soil moisture and runoff. The students will then construct a terrarium as a way to observe the water cycle as a whole. Immediately following this, students will use the Internet to acquire Real Time Data from the Olympic Peninsula which they can then use to describe how the phases of the water cycle look on the Olympic Peninsula.
www-k12.atmos.washington.edu/k12/pilot/water_cycle/teacherpage.html
Water Filtration – Students design their own water filtration system and then test it with soapy water.
nesen.unl.edu/lessons/water/waterfilt.asp
“What’s In Your Water?” Program – Earth Day Network Education Program’s new lesson plans on water quality and water testing.
www.earthday.net/goals/clean_water.stm

Intermediate

Water

Additional Resources

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books
Florida’s Springs: Protecting Nature’s Gems – is an in-depth photo-documentary exploration of Florida’s springs and aquifers. It includes lesson plans for all grade levels, a great interactive on the hydrologic cycle, and an online photographic expedition exploring deep into the aquifer in order to follow the journey of water (along with some Florida tourism plugs). Presented by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection with the input of the Florida Geological Survey.
www.floridasprings.org
GM K-12 Education Initiatives – has a collection of environmental Web sites
gm.com/company/gmability/environment/gm_and_the_env/env_edu/index.html
Multihazard Mapping Initiative – from the Federal emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Opens with a clickable map of U.S. states, where you can zoom in to the county level to view hazard maps relating to earthquakes, floods, tornadoes, and more. Audience: Middle School and Up.
www.hazardmaps.gov/
New USGS Publication on North America Glaciers – Glaciers of North America (USGS Professional Paper 1386-J) is the newest of the 11-volume Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World series. It is a review of historical and ongoing changes in the glaciers of Canada, United States, and Mexico, with reference to the Landsat image baseline years. Long-term monitoring of fluctuations of glaciers provides an important indicator of changes in regional and global climates. Additional information about the USGS Glacier Project and other volumes in the series is available. You might look at the other glacier atlases available.
www.glaciers.er.usgs.gov
Processes of River Erosion, Transport, and Deposition – Animations and visualizations from Carleton College.
http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/visualization/collections/erosion_deposition.html
River Processes – Site with animated river processes posted by Wycombe High School.
www.school-portal.co.uk/
U.N. Atlas of the Oceans – from the UN, this comprehensive, well organized site about oceans is divided into four main sections.
www.oceansatlas.org/index.jsp
United States Geological Survey –
USGS water resources site – Here you can monitor every drop of water in our nation! Lots of information, maybe too much, but check out the ‘real time’ map of water in the U.S. – show where there is drought and where there is plenty.
The education link under “Publications and Products” gets you to additional USGS water links for kids, K-12, including lesson plans for teachers (click on “USGS Learning Web”). water.usgs.gov
Water Education Poster series – offers 6 colorful, educational, and fun posters on the following topics: Wetlands, Water Use, Wastewater, Navigation, Ground Water, Water Quality Each poster is available in two versions, one for elementary students and one for middle-school students. Information is available at this web site: /water.usgs.gov/outreach/OutReach.html.
This outreach activity is part of the larger USGS Learning Web, which can be found at this web site: www.usgs.gov/education/
Water Cycle – USGS has just updated its water cycle website. Contains text and a diagram that comes in many languages and without the key words so students can fill in the blanks. http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle.html
World Water Monitoring Day – To help facilitate your planning, WWMD has expanded the “Resources” section of this Web site to contain a variety of materials designed to make your event a success. – from the UN, this comprehensive, well organized site about oceans is divided into four main sections.
http://www.worldwatermonitoringday.org/

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books
Poison in the Rockies – Amazing video about the threats to water quality in the Colorado Rockies (mining, acid precipitation and recreational development). Here is PBS’s updated “Nova” version of the award-winning DOWNWIND/DOWNSTREAM, documenting the serious threat to water quality, sub-alpine ecosystems and public health in the Colorado Rockies from mining operations, acid rain and urbanization. 56 minutes. Grade Level: Grades 9-12, College, Adult. US Release Date: 1990. ISBN: 1-56029-065-X.
www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/poison.html
Contact GSA’s Subaru Distinguished Earth Science Educator for a video worksheet.

Interactive Internet Sites Videos Books

Janice VanCleave’s Oceans for Every Kid: Easy Activities That Make Learning Science Fun, by Janice VanCleave. Grades 4-7. Hands-on activities as well as good information on oceanographic techniques, topography of the ocean floor, ocean movements, and sea water properties. Paperback: ISBN 0471124532.

Planet Ocean: A Story of Life, the Sea, and Dancing to the Fossil Record, by Matsen, Brad and Ray Troll. Wide age range. A great look at the third planet out from the sun. Paperback: ISBN 0898157781, Hardcover: ISBN 0898156181.

Secondary

Water

Lesson Plans

Groundwater Contamination Lesson PlanUses a concept diagram to aid with comprehension of two short articles concerning contamination of underground drinking water supplies.

Groundwater – Water we doing to our planet? – Students will calculate yearly runoff created by a parking lot, and calculate the loss of water that would have entered the groundwater system.

Land vs. Water Temperature LabActivity that studies how land and water have different heat capacities, effecting the temperature and weather of the Earth. Students take their own temperature measurements to see how land heats and cools faster.

Lesson Plan Links

NOAA Ocean Explorer – provides 165 lesson plans developed to bring entire classrooms “on board” for exploration and discovery. Topics include deep-sea hydrothermal vents and their spectacular animal communities, benthic creatures of the Northern Gulf of Mexico (one of Earth’s most geologically complex regions), seafloor methane, unexplored deep reef habitats off the Carolinas, the Titanic, and the mystery of the Steamship Portland (lost in a 1898 storm off New England). (NOAA)
http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/edu/welcome.html
Ocean Currents – An activity in which students will map the patterns of the major ocean currents, and learn about the influences of wind, water temperature, landmasses, and water density on currents.
http://www.teachervision.com/lesson-plans/lesson-2916.html
Water Quality for Freshwater Organisms – Appropriate for grades 8-12.
http://ofcn.org/cyber.serv/academy/ace/sci/cecsci/cecsci028.html
How Clean is the Water that You are Drinking? – The objective of this lesson is to have the student practice the techniques that are used by water quality examiners in their area. The students will do this by testing their own water at home as well as water from bodies of water for possible contamination. Need to purchase testing kits to complete.
http://www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/admin/topdoc/gi/235/chapter3.html#1
The LEO EnviroSci Inquiry Web site – has good background information on water quality and testing instruments as well as lesson plans.
http://www.leo.lehigh.edu/envirosci/guide/index.html
“What’s In Your Water?” Program – Earth Day Network Education Program’s new lesson plans on water quality and water testing.
http://www.earthday.net/goals/clean_water.stm
Florida’s Springs: Protecting Nature’s Gems – is an in-depth photo-documentary exploration of Florida’s springs and aquifers. It includes lesson plans for all grade levels, a great interactive on the hydrologic cycle, and an online photographic expedition exploring deep into the aquifer in order to follow the journey of water (along with some Florida tourism plugs).
Use this address to go directly to the lesson plans: www.floridasprings.org/resources/ or drop the “/resources” to go to the home page. 9-12 lesson plan is: “Quenching the Thirst of Florida’s Yards” – Requires students to evaluate water irrigation practices at their schools including calculating water usage, total area of school grounds irrigated, and recommending changes in landscaping to reduce or minimize water usage.
The Global Water Sampling Project: An Investigation of Water Quality – From April 1 until June 6, 2003, students will team up around the globe to test fresh water. Join us in this collaborative project, comparing the water quality of your local river, stream, lake or pond with other fresh water sources around the world. The focus of the project is: 1. To assess the quality of water based on physical characteristics and chemical substances. 2. To look for relationships and trends among the data collected by all project participants. All students are welcome to participate, however, it is recommended for high school students (ages 14-18) due to the nature of the tests required for the project.
www.k12science.org/curriculum/waterproj/index.shtml
Take A Dip! – Students are teaming up around the globe to test fresh water. Join us in this collaborative project, comparing the water quality of your local river, stream, lake or pond with other fresh water sources around the world. From April 1 – June 6, 2003, students will team up around the globe to test fresh water. The focus of the project is: * To assess the quality of water based on physical characteristics and chemical substances. * To assess the quality of water based on macroinvertebrates found in the water. * To look for relationships and trends among the data collected by all project participants. Recommended Grade Levels 6-8 but all are invited to participate.
www.k12science.org/curriculum/dipproj/index.shtml
Ever Wonder What Causes a Pot of Water to Boil? – If you have, this project’s for you! We have people all over the world boiling water! In the past we’ve had climbers on Mt. Everest, school children in La Paz, Bolivia and college professors in Cheyenne, Wyoming all participating in the project. The purpose of this project is to discover which factor in the experiment (room temperature, elevation, volume of water, or heating device) has the greatest influence on boiling point. Anyone can participate in this year’s project. All you have to do is boil a bit of water, record a bit of information, and send it along to us to include in the database of results. Then, students can analyze all of the data to reach an answer to the question: What causes a pot of water to boil? It’s that simple!
www.k12science.org/curriculum/boilproj/index.html

Secondary

Water

Additional Resources

Florida’s Springs: Protecting Nature’s Gems – is an in-depth photo-documentary exploration of Florida’s springs and aquifers. It includes lesson plans for all grade levels, a great interactive on the hydrologic cycle, and an online photographic expedition exploring deep into the aquifer in order to follow the journey of water (along with some Florida tourism plugs). Presented by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection with the input of the Florida Geological Survey.
www.floridasprings.org
GM K-12 Education Initiatives – has a collection of environmental Web sites
gm.com/company/gmability/environment/gm_and_the_env/env_edu/index.html
Multihazard Mapping Initiative – from the Federal emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Opens with a clickable map of U.S. states, where you can zoom in to the county level to view hazard maps relating to earthquakes, floods, tornadoes, and more. Audience: Middle School and Up.
www.hazardmaps.gov/
New USGS Publication on North America Glaciers – Glaciers of North America (USGS Professional Paper 1386-J) is the newest of the 11-volume Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World series. It is a review of historical and ongoing changes in the glaciers of Canada, United States, and Mexico, with reference to the Landsat image baseline years. Long-term monitoring of fluctuations of glaciers provides an important indicator of changes in regional and global climates. Additional information about the USGS Glacier Project and other volumes in the series is available. You might look at the other glacier atlases available.
www.glaciers.er.usgs.gov
OCEAN EXPLORER, NOAA Great lessons with labs and activities on ocean science available at this NOAA site. They also offer workshops around the country. Also videos, gallery of pictures.
http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/
Processes of River Erosion, Transport, and Deposition – Animations and visualizations from Carleton College.
http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/visualization/collections/erosion_deposition.html
River Processes – Site with animated river processes posted by Wycombe High School.
www.school-portal.co.uk/GroupRenderCustomPage.asp?GroupID=12426&ResourceId=60796
SEA LEVEL: Frequently asked questions and answers – Find answers to such questions as `What is Mean Sea Level?`, `Why is the sea level higher off the coast of Bermuda than New York?
www.pol.ac.uk/psmsl/puscience/index.html#1
U.N. Atlas of the Oceans – from the UN, this comprehensive, well organized site about oceans is divided into four main sections.
www.oceansatlas.org/index.jsp
United States Geological Survey –
USGS water resources site – Here you can monitor every drop of water in our nation! Lots of information, maybe too much, but check out the ‘real time’ map of water in the U.S. – show where there is drought and where there is plenty.
The education link under “Publications and Products” gets you to additional USGS water links for kids, K-12, including lesson plans for teachers (click on “USGS Learning Web”). water.usgs.gov
Water Education Poster series – offers 6 colorful, educational, and fun posters on the following topics: Wetlands, Water Use, Wastewater, Navigation, Ground Water, Water Quality Each poster is available in two versions, one for elementary students and one for middle-school students. Information is available at this web site: /water.usgs.gov/outreach/OutReach.html.
This outreach activity is part of the larger USGS Learning Web, which can be found at this web site: www.usgs.gov/education/
Water Cycle – USGS has just updated its water cycle website. Contains text and a diagram that comes in many languages and without the key words so students can fill in the blanks. http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle.html
World Water Monitoring Day – To help facilitate your planning, WWMD has expanded the “Resources” section of this Web site to contain a variety of materials designed to make your event a success. – from the UN, this comprehensive, well organized site about oceans is divided into four main sections.
http://www.worldwatermonitoringday.org/

Elementary

Weather & Atmosphere

Lesson Plan Links

Investigating the Climate System: Weather: The Global Awareness – This is a problem-based classroom module for students in grades 5-8. It is designed to be used at the end of a unit on weather to help students apply their knowledge to real-world problems. Students become the Events Manager for a music group that is planning a world tour. They have to use their knowledge of weather to decide which cities the group will visit on a tour that focuses attention on natural environmental weather hazards.
www.strategies.org/TRMM/Weather_04.pdf
Learn: Atmospheric Science Explores Cycles of the Earth and Atmosphere, UCAR – This on-line teaching module is for middle school science teachers. While some students may find portions of this site useful, the primary audience is classroom teachers and it has been developed with that target audience in mind. The site provides background information and supporting classroom teaching materials. The content focus is climate change and issues related to both stratospheric and tropospheric ozone.
www.ucar.edu/learn/index.htm
Modeling the Reasons for Seasonal Change, Globe – This activity looks at what causes the Earth’s seasons, with a focus on the Earth’s tilt and spherical shape. Students learn how sunlight spreads over the Earth by modeling different tilts using a three-dimensional polyhedron which they construct from paper, and calculate the relative sunlight intensity received by the Northern and Southern Hemispheres to understand seasonal differences between the hemispheres.
www.globe.gov/tctg/earth_la_seaphen_s4.pdf?sectionId=259
Weather & Climate – Selected Labs and Activities from Earth to Class.
earth2class.org/curr_units/
Wisconsin Weather Stories – Site with lesson plans, stories, weather sayings, and more.
http://weatherstories.ssec.wisc.edu/
Recipe for a Core Lab: students will learn how to take field notes as scientists do, using a simulated sediment core, constructed with edible items. Students will use metric notations to mark changes in the sediments, objects such as fossils and glacial pebbles in the core sample, and to select a spot to sample. They will use a small round cookie cutter to obtain a cylindrical sample of the core.
tea.rice.edu/Archive/activity/tea_trummelcoreactivity.html
Program download: Global Warming: WorldWatcher, a supportive scientific visualization environment for geospatial data, is available for both Macintosh and Windows. The software provides an accessible and supportive environment for students to explore, interpret, and analyze scientific data in a manner which allows them to emulate the work of actual scientists.
www.worldwatcher.northwestern.edu/download.htm
Weather Unit from Scholastic – The Weather Maker is part of this page. Interactive Activities and Lesson Plans.
teacher.scholastic.com/activities/wwatch/
The Weather Eye – has lesson plans on weather for all ages. Has a ‘Teacher’s Lounge” for activities too.
weathereye.kgan.com/

Elementary

Weather

Additional Resources

World Climate: A site where you can get just about any climate data for any city in the world.
www.worldclimate.com/
Weather: Graphics and photo scrapbooks from USA Today to help students understand weather:
www.usatoday.com/weather/wgraph0.htm
How does Doppler radar work? NOAA Weather site.
weather.noaa.gov/radar/radinfo/radinfo.html
Meteograms for selected cities –
dstreme.comet.ucar.edu/metgram.html
DataStreme Atmosphere is a major teacher enhancement initiative of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). Its main goal is the training of Weather Education Resource Teachers who will promote the teaching of science, mathematics and technology using weather as a vehicle, across the K-12 curriculum in their home school districts.
dstreme.comet.ucar.edu
National Weather Service – a resource for national, regional, and local weather updates, forecasts, warnings, satellite, and Doppler radar imagery.
www.nws.noaa.gov
Atmosphere – definitions for atmosphere terms, including teacher and student version:
www.ace.mmu.ac.uk/eae/Atmosphere/atmosphere.html
Weather Unit from Scholastic – The Weather Maker is part of this page. Interactive Activities and Lesson Plans.
teacher.scholastic.com/activities/wwatch/
POSTER: Snowflake Thermometer Poster: A marvelous collage by Dorothy Wallace-Senft. This poster shows the type of snowflake formation relative to the temperature. Over 400 of Bentley’s snowflake images are cleverly used to illustrate the thermometer.
vermontsnowflakes.com/tshirts.htm

Intermediate

Weather & Atmosphere

Lesson Plans

Layers of the Atmosphere – (6-12) – To discover how the atmosphere can be divided into layers based on temperature changes at different heights by making a graph.

Land vs. Water Temperature Lab – (6-12) – To illustrate how dark land surfaces, light land surfaces and water all heat at different rates, effecting Earth’s temperature and weather. Illustrates that water heats more slowly than land and therefore the surface of the Earth must heat at different rates, causing our weather.

Lesson Plan Links

Investigating the Climate System: Weather: The Global Awareness – This is a problem-based classroom module for students in grades 5-8. It is designed to be used at the end of a unit on weather to help students apply their knowledge to real-world problems. Students become the Events Manager for a music group that is planning a world tour. They have to use their knowledge of weather to decide which cities the group will visit on a tour that focuses attention on natural environmental weather hazards.
www.strategies.org/TRMM/Weather_04.pdf
Learn: Atmospheric Science Explores Cycles of the Earth and Atmosphere, UCAR – This on-line teaching module is for middle school science teachers. While some students may find portions of this site useful, the primary audience is classroom teachers and it has been developed with that target audience in mind. The site provides background information and supporting classroom teaching materials. The content focus is climate change and issues related to both stratospheric and tropospheric ozone.
www.ucar.edu/learn/index.htm
Modeling the Reasons for Seasonal Change, Globe – This activity looks at what causes the Earth’s seasons, with a focus on the Earth’s tilt and spherical shape. Students learn how sunlight spreads over the Earth by modeling different tilts using a three-dimensional polyhedron which they construct from paper, and calculate the relative sunlight intensity received by the Northern and Southern Hemispheres to understand seasonal differences between the hemispheres.
www.globe.gov/tctg/earth_la_seaphen_s4.pdf?sectionId=259
Weather & Climate – Selected Labs and Activities from Earth to Class.
earth2class.org/curr_units/
Wisconsin Weather Stories – Site with lesson plans, stories, weather sayings, and more.
http://weatherstories.ssec.wisc.edu/
CIMSS – Satellite Meteorology course for grades 7-12. Combines striking satellite imagery with interactive learning activities such as teaching applets, discovery images, discovery quizzes, animations, faders, and clear explanatory text, even the most casual visit to this material translates to a learning experience.
http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/satmet/
Introductory Hurricane Lesson Plan – Steve Kluge, NY: Hurricane lesson using real data and online resources.
www.bedford.k12.ny.us/flhs/science/geoscience/regentses/tropicalseason.html
Recipe for a Core Lab: students will learn how to take field notes as scientists do, using a simulated sediment core, constructed with edible items. Students will use metric notations to mark changes in the sediments, objects such as fossils and glacial pebbles in the core sample, and to select a spot to sample. They will use a small round cookie cutter to obtain a cylindrical sample of the core.
tea.rice.edu/Archive/activity/tea_trummelcoreactivity.html
Program download: Global Warming: WorldWatcher, a supportive scientific visualization environment for geospatial data, is available for both Macintosh and Windows. The software provides an accessible and supportive environment for students to explore, interpret, and analyze scientific data in a manner which allows them to emulate the work of actual scientists.
www.worldwatcher.northwestern.edu/download.htm
Dewpoint and Relative Humidity Lab – New York Regents: includes making a sling psychrometer:
www.bedford.k12.ny.us/flhs/science/labs/esrdewpointrh.pdf
Weather Unit from Scholastic – The Weather Maker is part of this page. Interactive Activities and Lesson Plans.
teacher.scholastic.com/activities/wwatch/
Cloud in a Bottle Demonstration – Directions for a classic.
9news.com/storyfull-search.asp?id=6818
Weather – A whole list of 4 – 8 weather lesson plans from the Discovery Channel site.
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/weather.html
Wire Antarctica – Learn about glaciers and the science that is taking place in Antarctica.
www.geophys.washington.edu/People/Students/ginny/antarctica/
The Weather Eye – has lesson plans on weather for all ages. Has a ‘Teacher’s Lounge” for activities too.
weathereye.kgan.com/

Intermediate

Weather & Atmosphere

Additional Resources

Internet Sites Books Curriculum Projects Videos
Hurricane Tracker – Interested in the history making 2005 hurricane season? This site is a quick way to visualize storm development and history based on NOAA data. Visualize these meteorological oceanographic events as they unfold via animated hurricane tracks! There is an interactive Hurricane Guide where students can review basic facts and FAQ’s. The 2004 season is also available. The Hurricane Tracker is an easy to use visualization tool appropriate for all age groups.
www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7845030/
Hurricane Strike! Hurricane Science & Safety for Students – This site provides a multimedia interactive simulation that teaches students about emergency preparedness, disaster safety, and weather and storm science. Students can track the storm on a map, watch weather updates, prepare emergency supplies, and develop a disaster emergency plan. Additional materials for teachers to use with students in the classroom are available.
http://meted.ucar.edu/hurrican/strike/
Coriolis Effect (UCSB) – This is a set of four animations, with text explanations, that illustrate what the Coriolis Effect is, how it behaves, and what causes it.
http://earthedonline.org/EED_Online/Content/
NOWCAST, NOAA – This is “NOAA’s web mapping portal to real time coastal information and NOAA forecasts.” (Actually, all U.S. inland sites are also available.) This highly interactive site is yet another example of how GIS-like interfaces are becoming increasingly more common for data retrieval. Choose an area of interest, zoom in or out, and choose from a variety of data layers. For instance, you can access GOES images, Doppler radar, wave height, sea surface temperature, stream discharge as well as standard weather station data such as temperature, pressure, and wind direction. By selecting an individual data point you can query station data. There is a “how to” lesson plan (in yellow) located on the upper right hand portion of the main page.
www.nowcoast.noaa.gov
World Climate: A site where you can get just about any climate data for any city in the world.
www.worldclimate.com/
Weather: Graphics and photo scrapbooks from USA Today to help students understand weather:
www.usatoday.com/weather/wgraph0.htm
How does Doppler radar work? NOAA Weather site.
weather.noaa.gov/radar/radinfo/radinfo.html
Meteograms for selected cities –
dstreme.comet.ucar.edu/metgram.html
DataStreme Atmosphere is a major teacher enhancement initiative of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). Its main goal is the training of Weather Education Resource Teachers who will promote the teaching of science, mathematics and technology using weather as a vehicle, across the K-12 curriculum in their home school districts.
dstreme.comet.ucar.edu
National Weather Service – a resource for national, regional, and local weather updates, forecasts, warnings, satellite, and Doppler radar imagery.
www.nws.noaa.gov
Atmosphere – definitions for atmosphere terms, including teacher and student version:
www.ace.mmu.ac.uk/eae/Atmosphere/atmosphere.html
Weather Unit from Scholastic – The Weather Maker is part of this page. Interactive Activities and Lesson Plans.
teacher.scholastic.com/activities/wwatch/
On-Line Tutorial – About Rainbows: The site provides adequate information for a student, as well as a teacher, who needs research or information on the subject of rainbows.
www.unidata.ucar.edu/staff/blynds/rnbw.html
HISTORIC WEATHER – from Weather Underground, check daily historic weather conditions from 1994 through 2003 for most U.S. locations. Go to any city’s forecast page and then click on “Historic Weather” toward the bottom of the page. Some records are incomplete but the following conditions are usually reported: mean temperature, max. temperature, min. temperature, growing degree days, dew point precipitation, snow depth, standard pressure, sea level pressure, visibility, wind speed, max wind speed, gust speed, events. Enter the city of interest at the top of the following page: (Audience: middle school and up)
www.wunderground.com/forecasts/
The American Meteorological Society – This site has a wonderful list of resources on weather. There is a list of educational initiatives for pre-college teachers, books, videos and more.
www.ametsoc.org/AMS/
Welcome to Tsunami! – This site covers the mechanisms of tsunami generation and propagation, the impact of tsunamis on humankind, and the Tsunami Warning System.
www.enviroliteracy.org/subcategory.php/166.html
Hurricanes and Typhoons – Defense Meteorologic23 May, 2008s of hurricanes and typhoons? This site has them.
www.ngdc.noaa.gov/dmsp/dmsp.html
Tornado Paths – Web site for exploring tornado paths of all tornadoes from 1950-2004. Clicking on tornado icon allows one to add information (and, soon, personal images and stories) and “Fly the Path”, which opens a Google Earth® 3D tour of the tornado’s path (must have Google Earth installed and must download .kml file).
climate.engin.umich.edu/tornadopaths/
The Tornado Project Online – This site contains information about tornado myths, tornado oddities, personal experiences, tornado chasing, tornado safety, and tornadoes in the past as well as more recent tornadoes.
www.tornadoproject.com/
Electricity Misconceptions – This thought-provoking site takes a look at some of our fundamental notions about electricity. It even has a few things to say about Ben Franklin’s famous lightning experiment.
www.eskimo.com/~billb/miscon/franklins
Weather EYE – KGAN News 2 has weather resources and lesson plans.
weathereye.kgan.com/
Background Information on Weather Instruments and Scales –
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/weather.htm
Information and some lesson plans on Weather –
www.proteacher.com/110022.shtml
Environmental Literacy Project Weather page –
www.enviroliteracy.org/subcategory.php/166.html

Internet Sites Books Curriculum Projects Videos

POSTER: Snowflake Thermometer Poster, A marvelous collage by Dorothy Wallace-Senft. This poster shows the type of snowflake formation relative to the temperature. Over 400 of Bentley’s snowflake images are cleverly used to illustrate the thermometer.

Project Earth Science: Meteorology, P. Sean Smith and Brent A. Ford. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association. 1994. Excellent weather book with many lesson plans including student pages. (233 pages) Middle – High

The Weather Book, Jack Williams. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association. 1992. A new approach to understanding the weather and how it occurs. (212 pages) Middle – High

Internet Sites Books Curriculum Projects Videos
Acid Rain – Part of the Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) series. Lots of activities to investigate acid rain. 1990.
GEMS, Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.
Weatherschool – Complete weather curriculum that includes a teacher resource guide and 20 independent lessons with student worksheets and hands-on activities, and software. 1990.
Weatherschool, Yaros Communications, Inc., 7536 Forsyth Boulevard, Suite 110, St. Louis, MO 63105, (314) 851-6750. Elem-Middle

Internet Sites Books Curriculum Projects Videos
Wind, Wet, Heat & Cold; 2 disc set with 4 titles: Teacher recommended: “It’s a great set with very cool visualizations … condensation nuclei segment one of the best visuals I’ve seen; also planetary wind belts.” $29
www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/
The Climate Puzzle – (video, 1986, 60 min) Part of the Planet Earth series. Looks at modern changes in climate.
Available from NSTA and most educational video retailers.
Weather Radar VHS Videotape – An introduction to the latest Doppler weather radar deployed by the U.S. National Weather Service. Discussion of its capability to detect precipitation and atmospheric motions. Examples of its capability to detect fronts, hurricanes, thunderstorms, tornadoes and winter storms are shown. Length 10 min. (approx.).
Available from AMS at www.ametsoc.org/AMS/
Water Vapor: The Unseen Weather – VHS Videotape. Explains the use and meaning of satellite water vapor imagery. This new weather forecasting tool is compared with the more familiar images seen daily on television weathercasts. Water vapor imagery of hurricane, summer thunderstorm complexes and winter storms (The Blizzard of ’93) are shown. Length 15:40).
Available from AMS at www.ametsoc.org/AMS/

Secondary

Weather & Atmosphere

Lesson Plans

Layers of the Atmosphere – (6-12) – To discover how the atmosphere can be divided into layers based on temperature changes at different heights by making a graph.

Land vs. Water Temperature Lab – (6-12) – To illustrate how dark land surfaces, light land surfaces and water all heat at different rates. Illustrates that water heats more slowly than land and therefore the surface of the Earth must heat at different rates, causing our weather.

Lesson Plan Links

Wisconsin Weather Stories – Site with lesson plans, stories, weather sayings, and more.
http://weatherstories.ssec.wisc.edu/
CIMSS – Satellite Meteorology course for grades 7-12. Combines striking satellite imagery with interactive learning activities such as teaching applets, discovery images, discovery quizzes, animations, faders, and clear explanatory text, even the most casual visit to this material translates to a learning experience.
http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/satmet/
Introductory Hurricane Lesson Plan – Steve Kluge, NY: Hurricane lesson using real data and online resources.
www.bedford.k12.ny.us/flhs/science/geoscience/regentses/tropicalseason.html
Recipe for a Core Lab: students will learn how to take field notes as scientists do, using a simulated sediment core, constructed with edible items. Students will use metric notations to mark changes in the sediments, objects such as fossils and glacial pebbles in the core sample, and to select a spot to sample. They will use a small round cookie cutter to obtain a cylindrical sample of the core.
tea.rice.edu/Archive/activity/tea_trummelcoreactivity.html
Program download: Global Warming: WorldWatcher, a supportive scientific visualization environment for geospatial data, is available for both Macintosh and Windows. The software provides an accessible and supportive environment for students to explore, interpret, and analyze scientific data in a manner which allows them to emulate the work of actual scientists.
www.worldwatcher.northwestern.edu/download.htm
Dewpoint and Relative Humidity Lab – New York Regents: includes making a sling psychrometer:
www.bedford.k12.ny.us/flhs/science/labs/esrdewpointrh.pdf
Weather Unit from Scholastic – The Weather Maker is part of this page. Interactive Activities and Lesson Plans.
teacher.scholastic.com/activities/wwatch/
University of Illinois: The Weather Unit – Recommends resources and outlines lessons for teachers preparing a comprehensive unit on weather and meteorology.
faldo.atmos.uiuc.edu/WEATHER/weather.html
Build Your Own Weather Station!
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/weather.html
Wired Antarctica – Learn more about Antarctica; why is it important and what you can learn there. Researchers from prestigious institutions in Canada and the U.S. put together this site with lessons, worksheets, activities, and loads of information about this frozen continent.
www.geophys.washington.edu/People/Students/ginny/antarctica/
The Weather Eye – has lesson plans on weather for all ages. Has a ‘Teacher’s Lounge” for activities too.
weathereye.kgan.com/

Secondary

Weather & Atmosphere

Additional Resources

Internet Sites Books Curriculum Projects Videos
The American Meteorological Society – This site has a wonderful list of resources on weather. There is a list of educational initiatives for pre-college teachers, books, videos and more.
www.ametsoc.org/AMS/
Atmosphere – definitions for atmosphere terms, including teacher and student version:
www.ace.mmu.ac.uk/eae/Atmosphere/atmosphere.html
Background Information on Weather Instruments and Scales –
www.sd5.k12.mt.us/glaciereft/weather.htm
Coriolis Effect (UCSB) – This is a set of four animations, with text explanations, that illustrate what the Coriolis Effect is, how it behaves, and what causes it.
http://earthedonline.org/EED_Online/Content/
DataStreme Atmosphere is a major teacher enhancement initiative of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). Its main goal is the training of Weather Education Resource Teachers who will promote the teaching of science, mathematics and technology using weather as a vehicle, across the K-12 curriculum in their home school districts.
dstreme.comet.ucar.edu
Electricity Misconceptions – This thought-provoking site takes a look at some of our fundamental notions about electricity. It even has a few things to say about Ben Franklin’s famous lightning experiment.
www.eskimo.com/~billb/miscon/franklins
Environmental Literacy Project Weather page –
www.enviroliteracy.org/subcategory.php/166.html
Historic Weather – from Weather Underground, check daily historic weather conditions from 1994 through 2003 for most U.S. locations. Go to any city’s forecast page and then click on `Historic Weather.` toward the bottom of the page. Some records are incomplete but the following conditions are usually reported: mean temperature, max. temperature, min. temperature, growing degree days, dew point precipitation, snow depth, standard pressure, sea level pressure, visibility, wind speed, max wind speed, gust speed, events. Enter the city of interest at the top of the following page: (Audience: middle school and up)
www.wunderground.com/forecasts/
How does Doppler radar work? NOAA Weather site.
weather.noaa.gov/radar/radinfo/radinfo.html
Hurricanes and Typhoons – Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. Want to see some great satellite images of hurricanes and typhoons? This site has them.
www.ngdc.noaa.gov/dmsp/dmsp.html
Hurricane Mapping – This site provides real-time tracking of hurricanes, tropical storms, and typhoon data to incorporate into Google Earth, or your own GIS, mapping programs and datasets.  Currently the program is in Beta format and FREE through the end of the year (2007).  The data feeds are live and update directly in Google Earth.
http://hurricanemapping.com/index.cfm
Hurricane Tracker – Interested in the history making 2005 hurricane season? This site is a quick way to visualize storm development and history based on NOAA data. Visualize these meteorological oceanographic events as they unfold via animated hurricane tracks! There is an interactive Hurricane Guide where students can review basic facts and FAQ’s. The 2004 season is also available. The Hurricane Tracker is an easy to use visualization tool appropriate for all age groups.
www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7845030/
Hurricane Strike! Hurricane Science & Safety for Students – This site provides a multimedia interactive simulation that teaches students about emergency preparedness, disaster safety, and weather and storm science. Students can track the storm on a map, watch weather updates, prepare emergency supplies, and develop a disaster emergency plan. Additional materials for teachers to use with students in the classroom are available.
http://meted.ucar.edu/hurrican/strike/
Information and some lesson plans on Weather –
www.proteacher.com/110022.shtml
Meteograms for selected cities –
dstreme.comet.ucar.edu/metgram.html
National Weather Service – a resource for national, regional, and local weather updates, forecasts, warnings, satellite, and Doppler radar imagery.
www.nws.noaa.gov
NOWCAST, NOAA – This is “NOAA’s web mapping portal to real time coastal information and NOAA forecasts.” (Actually, all U.S. inland sites are also available.) This highly interactive site is yet another example of how GIS-like interfaces are becoming increasingly more common for data retrieval. Choose an area of interest, zoom in or out, and choose from a variety of data layers. For instance, you can access GOES images, Doppler radar, wave height, sea surface temperature, stream discharge as well as standard weather station data such as temperature, pressure, and wind direction. By selecting an individual data point you can query station data. There is a “how to” lesson plan (in yellow) located on the upper right hand portion of the main page.
www.nowcoast.noaa.gov
The Tornado Project Online – This site contains information about tornado myths, tornado oddities, personal experiences, tornado chasing, tornado safety, and tornadoes in the past as well as more recent tornadoes.
www.tornadoproject.com/
Weather: Graphics and photo scrapbooks from USA Today to help students understand weather:
www.usatoday.com/weather/wgraph0.htm
Weather EYE – KGAN News 2 has weather resources and lesson plans.
weathereye.kgan.com/
Weather Unit from Scholastic – The Weather Maker is part of this page. Interactive Activities and Lesson Plans.
teacher.scholastic.com/activities/wwatch/
Welcome to Tsunami! – This site covers the mechanisms of tsunami generation and propagation, the impact of tsunamis on humankind, and the Tsunami Warning System.
www.enviroliteracy.org/subcategory.php/166.html
World Climate: A site where you can get just about any climate data for any city in the world.
www.worldclimate.com/

Internet Sites Books Curriculum Projects Videos

POSTER: Snowflake Thermometer Poster, A marvelous collage by Dorothy Wallace-Senft. This poster shows the type of snowflake formation relative to the temperature. Over 400 of Bentley’s snowflake images are cleverly used to illustrate the thermometer.

Project Earth Science: Meteorology, P. Sean Smith and Brent A. Ford. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association. 1994. Excellent weather book with many lesson plans including student pages. (233 pages) Middle – High

The Weather Book, Jack Williams. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association. 1992. A new approach to understanding the weather and how it occurs. (212 pages) Middle – High

Internet Sites Books Curriculum Projects Videos
Acid Rain – Part of the Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) series. Lots of activities to investigate acid rain. 1990.
GEMS, Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.
Weatherschool – Complete weather curriculum that includes a teacher resource guide and 20 independent lessons with student worksheets and hands-on activities, and software. 1990.
Weatherschool, Yaros Communications, Inc., 7536 Forsyth Boulevard, Suite 110, St. Louis, MO 63105, (314) 851-6750. Elem-Middle

Internet Sites Books Curriculum Projects Videos
The Climate Puzzle – (video, 1986, 60 min) Part of the Planet Earth series. Looks at modern changes in climate.
Available from www.nsta.org and most educational video retailers.
Water Vapor: The Unseen Weather – VHS Videotape. Explains the use and meaning of satellite water vapor imagery. This new weather forecasting tool is compared with the more familiar images seen daily on television weathercasts. Water vapor imagery of hurricane, summer thunderstorm complexes and winter storms (The Blizzard of ’93) are shown. Length 15:40).
Available from AMS at www.ametsoc.org/AMS/
Weather Radar VHS Videotape – An introduction to the latest Doppler weather radar deployed by the U.S. National Weather Service. Discussion of its capability to detect precipitation and atmospheric motions. Examples of its capability to detect fronts, hurricanes, thunderstorms, tornadoes and winter storms are shown. Length 10 min. (approx.).
Available from AMS at www.ametsoc.org/AMS/
Wind, Wet, Heat & Cold; 2 disc set with 4 titles: Teacher recommended: “It’s a great set with very cool visualizations … condensation nuclei segment one of the best visuals I’ve seen; also planetary wind belts.” $29
www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/

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